Indiana State University Sycamore Scholars

Sycamore Scholars at Indiana State University >
ISU - Electronic Theses and Dissertations (by Department) >
Biology >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10484/3734

Title: Effects of Ectoparasites and Reproductive Class on Roost-Switching and Foraging Behavior of Indiana Bats (Myotis sodalis)
Issue Date: 19-Jan-2012
Abstract: Ectoparasites of bats have been known to cause harm to their hosts and to affect roost-switching. Little research exists on effects ectoparasites may have on roosting and foraging behavior of the federally endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). From 2008 through 2010, I collected ectoparasite data and documented roost-switching and foraging behavior of Indiana bats on habitat restoration lands owned by the Indianapolis International Airport (IND) in central Indiana. I tested for differences in roosting and foraging behavior between bats with varying ectoparasite loads, and for differences in ectoparasite load, roost-switching frequency, and foraging behavior between different reproductive classes of Indiana bats. I used the volume of ectoparasites of each Indiana bat when analyzing data. I found a significant difference in roost-switching frequency and ectoparasite volume between reproductive classes. Neither reproductive class nor ectoparasite load significantly affected any aspect of foraging behavior. Indiana bats in this study apparently maintained moderate loads of ectoparasites which may not affect foraging and roosting, but the insignificant results found in this study may have been due to a small sample size. The significant difference in roost-switching between reproductive classes likely demonstrates variation in bat thermoregulation. Lactating females and pregnant females have a higher need for group thermoregulation and switch roosts less frequently than post-lactating females and volant juveniles. Because ectoparasites have been found to increase in maternity colonies, volant juveniles and post-lactating females may disperse from the main colony roost and switch roosts more often to avoid higher intensities of ectoparasites.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10484/3734
In Collections:Biology

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
NGikas.PDF559.96 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

Items in Sycamore Scholars are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Copyright @ 2009 Indiana State University  - Feedback
Cunningham Memorial Library,510 North 6 1/2 Street, Terre Haute, IN 47809
        Bookmark and Share