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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10484/3905

Title: The impact of personality and affect on college student's motives for marijuana use.
Authors: Hawkins, Lindsey W
Issue Date: 9-May-2012
Abstract: Previous research has examined the relationship between motives for drinking and alcohol use. However, less research has been conducted on the relationship between motives for marijuana use and marijuana use/problems. This study attempted to examine what predictors of marijuana use and problems are mediated by motives for marijuana use, Prior research has identified several predictors of marijuana use including psychological distress, expectancies, sensation seeking, and various personality factors. In addition, previous studies have suggested that use-related problems are not merely a function of how much of a substance one consumes, but also one's motivation for using that substance. The current study tested a series of path models treating motives for marijuana use as mediators of the relationship between various affect-related and personality variables and marijuana use in a sample of college students who had used marijuana at least once in their lifetime (N =398, 60% female, mean age =19). Results suggested that Coping motives directly predict marijuana-related problems. Also, higher psychological distress and higher Relaxation and Tension Reduction expectancies predicted using marijuana for Coping reasons. Additionally, the relationship between Openness to Experience and marijuana use and between Perceptual and Cognitive Enhancement expectancies and use were mediated by Expansion motives (i.e., using marijuana to expand awareness), Higher levels of Perceived Peer Marijuana Use and Social/Sexual Facilitation expectancies predicted Social and Enhancement motives for marijuana use.The current study also suggested that psychological distress and Neuroticism redicts Conformity motives for marijuana use.In addition,Perceived Peer Marijuana Use and Neuroticism impacted marijuana outcomes directly as well as through alternate mediational pathways.Theoretical and practical implications of the results are present,as well as suggestions for future research.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10484/3905
In Collections:Curriculum, Instruction, and Media Technology

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