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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10484/4587

Title: The Effects of Playing<br /> Surfaces on Landing<br /> Mechanics During A<br /> Jump Rebound-Landing<br /> Task
Authors: Stankowski, Kayla
Issue Date: 22-Oct-2012
Abstract: CONTEXT: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common among physically active people. Most ACL injuries occur from a noncontact mechanism such as landing from a jump. It is well known that neuromuscular risk factors, such as poor landing mechanics can increase the risk for ACL injury. However, it is unknown how playing surfaces affect landing mechanics. OBJECTIVE: Determine if landing on different athletic surfaces effects landing mechanics. DESIGN: Repeated measures design SETTING: Research Laboratory and Gymnasium PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-two healthy, physically active individuals (14 males, 18 females; age=20±2years; height= 172.1±9.7 cm and mass=71±14kg) were recruited to participate in this study. INTERVENTION: Independent variable was surface type, a wood basketball court and a volleyball sport court. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Landing mechanics, assessed by the LESS. A paired samples t-test was performed to compare the mean LESS scores on each surface within participants. RESULTS: No significant differences (P=0.22) were identified between the LESS scores on the wood basketball court (6±1) and the volleyball sport court surfaces (6±2) within each participant. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study demonstrated no differences in landing mechanics between a wood basketball court and a volleyball sport court surface as assessed by LESS scores. Clinicians and researchers should also take into consideration that shoes were not standardized between participants, which could alter results due to differences in shoe-surface interaction. Therefore future research should examine other athletic playing surfaces, including outdoor surfaces such as grass and artificial turf as well as standardize shoes worn by participants.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10484/4587
In Collections:Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation

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