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Parenting a Child with Behavior Problems: Dimensions of Religiousness that Influence Parental Stress and Sense of Competence

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dc.contributor.author Weyand, Chelsea
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-22T21:19:14Z
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-01T17:08:52Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-22T21:19:14Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-01T17:08:52Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09-22T21:19:14Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10484/1177
dc.description.abstract Parenting a child with behavior problems has been associated with an increase in parental stress and a decrease in parental sense of competence. While parental religiosity has generally been associated with greater child and parent functioning, it has been suggested that when parenting a child with behavior problems, some aspects of parental religiousness (e.g., negative religious coping, biblical conservatism) might decrease functioning. One hundred and thirty-nine parents of children between the ages of three and twelve completed a questionnaire in order to examine the influence of religious variables (sanctification of parenting, negative religious coping, positive religious coping, biblical conservatism) on the relationship between child behavior problems and parental stress and sense of competence. Sanctification of parenting was found to moderate the relationship between child behavior problems and parental stress, such that parents high in sanctification showed little change in parenting stress as severity of behavior problems increased. Similarly, positive religious coping was found to play a protective role in the relationship between behavior problems and parental sense of competence. Overall, positive religious coping was related to increased stress in parents of children with few behavior problems while not decreasing stress for parents of children with more difficult behavior. Parents of children with greater perceived behavior problems reported significantly higher sanctification of parenting and parenting stress, as well as lesser use of positive religious coping and lower sense of competence. Negative religious coping and biblical conservatism did not moderate the relationship between child behavior problems and parental stress, nor sense of competence. This study provides further clarification of the dimensions of religiousness that are relevant to the parenting experience. It also provides evidence to suggest that parental religiousness can have either a positive or negative influence on parental functioning, depending on parenting circumstances and personal perceptions of God and religion.
dc.description.statementofresponsibility Chelsea Weyand
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Parenting.
dc.subject.lcsh Parental influences.
dc.subject.lcsh Sanctification.
dc.subject.lcsh Behavior disorders in children.
dc.subject.other Behavior problems.
dc.subject.other Parental stress.
dc.subject.other Parental sense of competence.
dc.subject.other Religious coping.
dc.subject.other Sanctification of parenting.
dc.subject.other Stress management.
dc.title Parenting a Child with Behavior Problems: Dimensions of Religiousness that Influence Parental Stress and Sense of Competence
dc.type Dissertation
dc.date.graduationmonth August
dc.date.published 2010
dc.description.committeechair O'Laughlin, Elizabeth
dc.description.committeemembers Patrick Bennett
dc.description.committeemembers Thomas Johnson
dc.description.degree Doctor of Psychology
dc.description.department Department of Psychology
dc.description.imprint Cunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State University
dc.description.itemidetd GS201009
dc.description.level Doctoral
dc.description.note Title from document title page. Document formatted into pages: contains 102p.: ill. Includes bibliography, abstract and appendix.


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