• Collegiate Student Athlete<br /> Perception of Satisfaction <br /> and Comfort with<br /> Athletic Training Students

      Tebbe, Keith (2012-10-22)
      TITLE: Collegiate student athlete perceptions of satisfaction and comfort with athletic training students CONTEXT: Athletic training students (ATS) and student athletes have a large amount of interaction with one another. Many other medical professions study the interaction that their students have with a patient population. OBJECTIVE: Investigate student athlete’s perception, satisfaction, and comfort with ATSs. DESIGN: Online survey. SETTING: Student athletes at CAATE- accredited institutions. PARTICIPANTS: 66 student athletes (20 male, 46 female) from 22 universities DATA COLLECTION: The survey consisted of 3 yes/no questions, 5 demographic questions, 1 multiple-answer question asking the participant to select characteristics that describe an ATS, 21 Likert scale questions based off previous perception and comfort studies, and 5 open ended questions. ANALYSIS: Analyzed for statistics of central tendency RESULTS: Student primarily perceive ATSs for taping ankles (n=62, 93.9%), distributing water/sports drinks (n= 62, 93.9%), and rehabilitating injuries (n=60, 90.9%). Athletes did not perceive ATSs as licensed health care professionals and minimally perceived ATS as participating in emergency care. Athletes were most satisfied with of respect ATSs demonstrated (4.3±0.8). Student athletes were least satisfied with ATSs’ communication with coaches (3.7±1.2) Student athletes were most comfortable with the ATS asking the ATC when unsure of an injury (4.7±0.5). Student athletes were least comfortable with discussing personal issues with an ATS (3.6±1.0). CONCLUSIONS: We found that in general, student athletes were satisfied and comfortable with the ATSs at their institution. ATSs, like other medical profession students, are receiving satisfactory marks from their patient population. KEYWORDS: athlete, athletic training student, satisfaction, comfort
    • Perceptions of Retention Indicators in Athletic Training

      Juzeszyn, Laura (2013-09-05)
      CONTEXT: Attrition in the profession of athletic training notably occurs in large numbers between 5-10 years of professional experience creating a profession dominated by young, entry-level practitioners. Theoretical constructs are currently used to explain the retention issues in athletic training, yet an assessment of individuals who have left the profession is lacking. Understanding reasons why athletic trainers leave their profession and their future plans may enhance retention efforts in athletic training. OBJECTIVE: To assess reasons why athletic trainers let their BOC lapse and leave the athletic training profession. DESIGN: Cross sectional-observational study. SETTING: Internet Survey. PARTICIPANTS: 1000 former certified athletic trainers who have let their BOC lapse within the past 5 years. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used SPSS to calculate descriptive statistics and a Kruskall-Wallis to assess work/family issues. We collected demographic data on all respondents and the variables contributing to a lack of retention. We assessed gender, age, relationship status, setting of employment, highest level of employment, and children on three levels: work/family, work-related, and burnout. RESULTS: We identified the majority of responses to the effect of work/family were neutral (2.5-3.5). The majority of work-related issues were neutral with the exception of ethical strain and travel demands, which contributed to retention. The majority of burnout factors contributed to individuals leaving the profession. CONCLUSIONS: Former athletic trainers fail to identify the connection between burnout and life stressors and do not make the connection that life stressors contribute to the lack of retention in the profession.