• Illegal Recruitment: A Self-Implosion and Corruption of the NCAA

      Jewell, Andrew
      Today’s high school/amateur athletes continue to get bigger, faster and stronger with every collegiate recruiting class. It would be easy to assume with more and more athletes having this type of ability that colleges would be on a more level playing field. That assumption is terribly wrong. The death penalty/capital punishment as defined by the Merriam-Webster Dictionary can be defined in short as: being sentenced to execution by a court of law for crimes committed (Capital Punishment). In collegiate sports, the death penalty has been enacted once and only once because of the ramifications that it had on the program. Why was the program given such a harsh penalty? Two words: illegal recruitment. Illegal recruitment, in short, can be defined by the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) as athletes receiving improper benefits from colleges, boosters (wealthy alumni donors to the university) or coaches to influence potential athletes to come and play for their respective athletic teams. Another thing destroying the NCAA are professional sports agents and scouts for professional sports teams. They continue to convince these young athletes to become a professional athlete at younger and younger ages. In this world money talks and when an agent or scout puts money in front of these young athletes’ faces, it is very often hard for them to turn it down. Often, these athletes do not come from the best situations, so they want to provide their respective families with the lives they have always wanted. Part of the NCAA’s mission statement is to provide fair opportunities to all athletes at all levels and illegal recruitment, as well as professional scouts and agents, are contributing to a tear down of not only a destruction of the NCAA’s mission but also selfimplosion of the NCAA as well. With student- athletes wanting more, it gives these boosters, scouts and agents giving these illegal gifts, that support bigger universities, more opportunities to recruit high profile athletes with ease, which is giving smaller colleges and universities no chance to compete (especially at the division one level) and is causing corruption in the NCAA and is not keeping the playing field level.
    • Illicit Drugs: Should they be legalized? Can technology and regulation make them safer?

      Ketcham III, Max Lee
      For many years America has been the leading force in substance prohibition. Many countries blindly follow the USA in an attempt to earn their respect. As a result, very few countries actually know what uses these illicit substances have; before it ever reached the hands of the right people, the wrong people take it, use it incorrectly, and leave a bad name on that substance forever. If people could slander a substance, America would end up being found the main conspirator in the slanderous lies and misconceptions! This study has been done in an attempt to clear the name of most illicit drugs to pave a path towards legalization. This path will require tumultuous amounts of research, experimentation, and education. Once that path is complete, a marked path should begin continuing education to the public and beginning regulation and sale of all illicit drugs.
    • The Importance of Being Proactive: Suicide Clusters, Prevention Programs, and Postvention Methods in the High School Setting

      Farmer, Lindsay
      The purpose of this paper is to explain the phenomenon of suicide clustering and suicide contagion in relation to teenagers and the education system and to provide detailed recommendations for both the prevention and postvention of youth suicide in the school system. Due to the prevalence of mental health issues in teenagers, especially depression, it is important for educators to be aware of the risks of youth suicide attempts and completion, as well as the inherent dangers of clustering that may occur. The phenomenon of suicide clustering will be explained, including the methods by which clustering occurs, as well as the risks schools face when a student commits suicide because of the increased chance of a suicide cluster. The common risks and warning signs of suicides, contagion, and clustering will be discussed. Additionally, the risks associated with LGBT and special needs youth will be analyzed in order to suggest proper prevention training for educators of these students. Furthermore, an extensive, threefold prevention program and curriculum that includes school personnel, students, and parents will be analyzed and recommended. Moreover, the use of school-wide risk assessment, a relatively new concept in suicide prevention and intervention, will be explored and recommended. Also, postvention efforts—including the roles of the school corporation and the dangers of glamorizing teen suicide—will be suggested to minimize the risk of contagion and clustering. All of this will be completed through literature review and data collection from peer-reviewed journal articles.
    • Issues and Challenges of Adapting a Creative Work

      Axe, Joshua Q.
      This paper presents an overview of the process of adapting a creative work (i.e., books, films, works of art, etc.) focusing on the unique issues and challenges of bringing two distinctive types of media and persons from different disciplines together to create a successful adaptation. While the nature of adaptation is change, the process to accomplish that transition is complex. This research discusses the media involved, some of the key people involved in the process (and their expectations of the end product), and other factors upon which the success or failure of an adaptation depends. Three main areas examined include how the skill and choices made by the adapter can impact the original work and the adaptation (both positively and negatively), how creative visions can mesh or clash, and whether some creative works should not be changed from their original form. This research study includes numerous articles on the Internet, on-line resources, Library resources, books, television, movies, as well as personal observations of the subject matter. This research can assist a potential adapter or creator of a work in making informed decisions about the viability of undertaking an adaptation project. Further in-depth study should be conducted prior to beginning any project of adaptation, since while some of the issues and challenges are evident and concrete, others are subjective in nature.
    • Issues within Nursing Facilities Involving Quality of Care for the Elderly

      Fluhr, Kendal
      The elderly population in the U.S. is growing each and every year. As this population grows, so does the number of senior citizens in need of constant care. Many are put into nursing homes instead of staying with family or receiving in-home care. The issue with this is that far too many nursing facilities do not give high quality care to residents. The goal of this study was to investigate what concerns are common at nursing homes and what can be done to resolve these problems. Based on research studies, articles, statistics, and informational websites, it was found that some of the most common challenges at nursing facilities are inadequate staffing, high turnover rate, abuse, neglect, medication errors, overuse of antipsychotics, and staff that are poorly trained in how to deal with mental impaired residents. There are several ways to alleviate these issues in order to improve quality of care. A large majority of solutions involve improving staff numbers, providing better staff training, and helping build trust between staff members.
    • Just as Aggressive Off-Field?: A Look at Football Player’s Aggression in Relation to Sexual Assault

      Sturgess, Emily
      Over the past several years, many athletes, football players in particular, have been accused of sexually violent acts. This article explores various aspects of an athlete’s life that could influence their decisions and potentially play a role in their choice to commit sexually violent acts. The four areas of research include biological makeup of an athlete, an athlete’s sense of entitlement, environmental factors and whether athletes are actually punished according to their crime. Research was conducted using previously published areas from a variety of fields including psychology, health, and racial and ethnic studies journals, as well as law reviews. Examples of such sexually violent acts are used from the past several years and include names such as Ray Rice and Jerry Sandusky. Ultimately, it was concluded that there is not one sole area of an athlete’s life that influences their decision to commit sexually violent acts, but rather several factors that could all potentially play a role. The article will also look at the behavior change model to present a proposed way at teaching athletes how to act off the field without using the aggression that they use on the field.
    • Lavender Oil: The New Sleep Aid

      Nichols, Audrey
      The purpose of this research paper is to discuss and evaluate the benefits of lavender oil within the general population and hospitalized patients. Specifically, this paper will look at aromatherapy use with lavender oil within the hospitalized population and it’s ability to better sleep quality within these patients. Sleep is a major factor in the boies ability to heal, and the hope of this research is to determine whether lavender oil would be an effective option for patients struggling with sleep disturbances during their hospital stay. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of lavender oil, previously conducted research articles and studies were used and review these potential benefits. After sixteen studies and articles were examined, it was determined that lavender oil shows statistical improvements in overall sleep quality and depth of sleep within the population. Because of these positive results, it is suggested that hospitals within the United States begin to offer lavender oil as an option for patients upon admission in order to better the overall patient experience.
    • The Mediterranean Diet: Could Obese America Eat its Way to a Longer Life?

      Gillenwater, Jordan
      The Mediterranean Diet (MD) is a long-standing form of nutrition that may be partially responsible for the long life-expectancy of European Mediterranean countries. If this diet is capable of increasing longevity, it may be worthy of integration into U.S. culture. This study uses literature to explore the effects of the MD on disease prevention, as avoidance of potentially lethal, non-communicable disease could increase longevity. Nationally prevalent diseases were studied, including obesity, type II diabetes, and COPD, among others. Results indicate that the diet has been linked to lower risk for development of a wide variety of diseases, thus indicating it could lengthen American life expectancy, making it a concern for the governmental, economic, and public health sectors. Some challenges of integration of the MD in U.S. culture were explored in literature. Major obstacles include financial limitations for economically distressed individuals, lack of accessibility, and clashing cultural barriers on diet style. Solutions were investigated and include SNAP reform to lessen financial stress, elimination of food deserts through the “Let’s Move!” campaign, and education of the public sector about the MD. Many challenges exist as barriers for the adoption of the diet in the U.S., and successful integration will require local and federal efforts. While integration will not be easy, significant changes in the future could allow the diet to become a part of U.S. culture. The MD could provide the increasingly obese United States with an opportunity to eat its way to a longer, healthier life.
    • Melodious Marketing: The Intentions of Music in T.V. Commercials

      Reithel, Katelyn
      Whether intentional or not, music seems to be an important element in television commercials. This thesis will determine exactly how effective music is and if a company’s marketing team considers using music to reach a specific advertising goal. To do this, several areas are discussed including psychomusicology (the effects of music on a human’s responses) in relation to emotional response and memorability, music’s effect of brand attitude and purchasing intentions made by consumers, the use of jingles, effects of T.V. commercials on the music industry, and the challenges that may arise by using music in a T.V. commercial. Regardless of the positives or negatives, music does indeed play a role in the effectiveness of a T.V. commercial to consumers and is a consideration all companies must include when creating their T.V. commercials.
    • The Men and Women Merely Players: Can Dramatherapy Can Help Those Who Need It Most?

      Underwood, Olivia
      Within the following work, we will discover the history, applications, and effectiveness of Dramatherapy, also called drama therapy. By looking at the origins of the ideas of both Psychodrama and Dramatherapy, we can see how far it has come and where it still needs to go. This information came from texts books, memoirs, and various articles. After that we will find how the efforts of Dramatherapists have paid off. By looking at specific case studies from the Americas and abroad, we can see the positive effects that using the traditions of theater as therapy. Across the board we see positive responses from patients suffering from ailments that include depression, terminal illness, stress, alienation, schizophrenia, and neurotrama. We will also see how the research techniques used in the field has an effect on the type of data produced and how that must change. The cases here found provide a brief look at the techniques used and how they affect the patients or subjects. Findings indicate that although Dramatherapy is effective, more data is need for the expansion of the field into more mainstream forms of therapy.
    • Multiple Sclerosis and the Benefits of Exercise

      Lovelace, Sydney P
      In this report, the effects that exercise has on multiple sclerosis are presented. Types, symptoms, and treatment options are described in order to give a clear understanding of the disease. The modes of exercise and the benefits that each mode holds will be explained and applied to the life of one living with multiple sclerosis. There will more attention toward resistance exercise, yoga, and tai chi as forms of exercise. Along with the benefits, the ways that poor posture and balance will be identified. With this information, the reader will gain an understanding about how identifying issues in posture and balance can lead to easier exercise prescription. Multiple studies and research have been conducted in order to further explain how exercise will impact a person living with MS. With this research, new forms of exercise, such as tai-chi, have surfaced and provided benefits to those living with MS. Also, there is data presented on topics such as the use of a force platform to identify balance control, pre and post-test scores for tai-chi intervention, and how a flight-time camera works. All of this information leads to the main idea of the thesis, which is that exercise has a positive effect on multiple sclerosis patients and could potentially slow down the progression of the disease.
    • My Way or the Highway: The Development and Use of Behavior Management and School Discipline

      Thomas, Patricia
      Behavior management is a crucial topic in education. The management of student behavior in a classroom can affect the entire learning experience. As the needs of students and teachers change, the methods of behavior management adapt to accommodate new needs. This thesis identifies behavior management starting in the 1960’s and research determining its effectiveness. The causes of change in classroom and school-wide discipline systems are addressed, including political climates, court involvement, and tragic events within schools. The behavior management methods used in the current day are discussed. Through a review of literature and online sources, the information provided was gathered and analyzed. Little empirical research existed backing any of the topics discussed. Individual classroom and school-wide behavior plans were not often supported with data. Rather, personal opinions of teachers and administrators made up the majority of information regarding success or failure of these systems. An increase in empirical data gathered in research settings is needed to fully determine the effectiveness of behavior management methods used in classrooms and school-wide. Teacher training in research backed systems is also imperative. Teachers lacking this training struggle to provide students with a positive and effective education.
    • No Child Left Behind: Fair and Equal Education

      Hayes, Dania
      Education is a big part of every American citizen’s life because by law, we are all required to attend school till at least the age of sixteen(Bush). Education is a way in which to get better jobs and better access within society. Within the United States, taxpayers are required to support education by funding the public school system. Education is knowledge. Knowledge is power and for all these reasons, No Child Left Behind should be of importance to every student capable of understanding it, every parent with school age children, and every new or old teacher. No Child Left Behind has raised many questions and issues. Educators, government officials, and scholars have been working since the start of the law to figure out the answers. There are many problems with No Child Left Behind. For one, the law requires all students to meet the same standards when realistically due to finances, resources, and disabilities all students cannot meet the same standards. It has also proven very hard for researchers to empirically test the performance of No Child Left Behind because prior to the law there were not many schools who had accountability standards like those and so there is nothing to test it against. Over the last ten years testing has gotten a little bit better but is still concentrated in elementary education and not secondary education. No Child Left Behind was a new, revolutionary education reform law that had the potential to produce good results through it’s good motives, but fell short because there was too much focus on only two subject areas, math and reading, standardized tests, and the accountability of teachers. There was not enough focus on the children and how the new plan may affect them.
    • Nos Non Abolere Ordo Lectionum: The History of the Historic Lectionary as Retained by the Lutheran Church

      Walts, Conner (2021-12)
      The history of the Historic Lectionary from a Lutheran perspective provided great insight into its development and retention in the 21st century. This paper reviews the long history of the Historic Lectionary, previously the lectionary of the Western church, and compares its value in light of recent lectionary developments. This study reveals a Lutheran perspective in light of the lectionary debate in the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod and succinctly sets forth centuries of lectionary history in the West.
    • Nutrition and the Effects on Student Behavior and Academic Performance in the Classroom

      Daniel, Kaitlin
      Nutrition, behavior, and academic performance; these three words have a few commonalities. They each can be related to children. They each can be related to school and they each can be related to issues in education. The following research has found intriguing statistics that are useful when investigating or planning a classroom climate. It has always been said that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It jumpstarts the metabolism and awakens he body. Along with this it helps curb the appetite before lunch. An early addition to school nutrition was the availability of breakfast before school. This was a benefit for students because it created less of a gap for those who did not have food at home and those that did. Behavior can be a trying issue in the classroom. Students who struggle with behavior are students who need extra help. There are many reasons that a student may struggle with negative behavior but, working 8 hours on school work on an empty stomach does not help the matters any. Hunger does not help with brain functionality or behavior. The studies cited provide evidence that while hunger and unhealthy eating habits are not the sole reason behind poor behavior and negative academic performance it does not help the matter either. Studies showed that students who were hungry or did not have adequate nutrition struggled greater at focusing and on short term recall than those students who were well nourished. By completing a search and literature review there was an outstanding amount of data and statistics to base a sound outcome.
    • Outbreak: Emergency Room Overcrowding

      Sum, Mary Elizabeth
      A phenomenon referred to as emergency room (ER) overcrowding, which is defined as, “the demand for emergency services exceeds the ability of physicians and nurses to provide quality care within a reasonable time” (Sinclair, 2007), is happening around the world today. This problem causes much grief for the patients trying to receive quality care from the affected hospitals, and therefore hospitals are looking for any solution to solve this problem. The research was conducted by a literary review by utilizing the CINAHL and the Nursing and Allied Health Collection database. It was conducted to discover any evidence of ER overcrowding, the causes of this issue plaguing hospitals all over the globe, and finally to see if other researchers have identified any solutions to solve ER overcrowding. Overall, it was discovered that the solution is not uniform for all hospitals experiencing ER overcrowding. It will take special analysis of the hospitals individually.
    • The Past, Present and Future of the English Language: How Has the English Language Changed and What Effects Are Going to Come as a Result of Texting?

      Tuttle, E. Carlene
      This paper outlines a brief historical synopsis of both language in general and the English language to set up a common knowledge baseline for the reader to understand references made regarding historical events. Next, the paper goes through common practices seen today within the realm of text messages, textisms, text speak, and the lingo used within these practices. Common practices within the technology based language and standardized English are analyzed to compare and contrast the two forms and to help answer the question of whether or not technology is harming the English language and its practices. Findings provide evidence that there are indeed similarities between the two forms and that there is a strong relation between informal spoken language and text speak. The final portion of the paper is devoted to the future of the language and how the language is developing. Interestingly enough, many of the practices used within text speak currently are very similar to that of ancient practices. There is also a look into academia along with looking at if and how the use of technology and the lingo that comes with it is affecting students and their literacy abilities. Results were varied and researchers found a hard time coming to a consensus but there were significant negative correlations along with positive correlations.
    • The Persistent Issue of Fraud in the Public Housing Sector across the United States

      Montague, Samantha
      The public housing sector and the idea of providing those who need assistance with housing has been around since President Ronald Reagan’s days and even before that, with the New York Housing Act of 1879 (Martens, 2009), when industrial workers faced wretched housing conditions. Public housing in this nation has grown from just being provided for industrial workers and their families in major cities, such as New York and Chicago, to what it is today. Today, public housing is present all across the nation and is found in every state from Indiana to Maryland to California, Florida, Oklahoma, all over. Public housing can be available in very large cities and in smaller towns.
    • The Physiological Effects and Projected Outcomes of Urbanization and Pollution on Reptiles

      Lockman, Dale Rodney
      Research regarding urbanization and its relationship with population fluctuations and physiological responses in animals has been assessed through a multitude of studies involving stress hormone changes, white blood cell counts and other physical and behavioral changes. The scope of this paper emphasizes the explanation of urbanization, the physiological and anatomical impact it has made on reptiles, and the projected outcomes urbanization will have in the future. Some questions are brought up in this paper to serve as a basic overview of what will be learned about urbanization and pollution. In order to provide background information, my research has been conducted and many studies were summarized. Even though there have been studies done that provide an overview for this topic, there should be future research conducted to determine exact ways urbanization can be limited to help protect the class of reptiles, along with all living organisms, from the harmful effects of urbanization and pollution.
    • Prenatal Genetic Testing: An overview of history, advancements, and impacts on health care

      Neumann, Jessica
      The purpose of this research is to study prenatal genetic testing and the advancements that have been made since the human genome project has made the testing process simpler and less invasive. Prenatal genetic testing is a screen or a test that is performed in order to determine if an embryo or fetus has a certain disease or condition before its birth. A variety of different prenatal tests and screens have been studied to evaluate what genetic conditions are screened for and when. The scope of this paper focuses on the historical overview, advancements, patients, tests, and impacts related to prenatal genetic testing. Some questions are presented in the beginning of this paper in order to fully describe and understand prenatal genetic testing and the benefits and issues relating to it. Conclusion: Prenatal genetic testing and screening is available for many diseases, but the typical test screens for only a select number of diseases and conditions.