• Comparison of Data Protection Laws in the United States vs. the European Union

      Decker, Trey
      Data protection legislation is an area that has become more talked about in the current times in the United States. With the advent of the secret documents leaked by former intelligence analyst Edward Snowden, and the quick-to-follow data breaches of two major corporations, potentially affecting around 160 million Americans, the time to discuss and understand this topic is now. The in-depth understanding of US data protection laws present significant issues therein. There lie holes and fissures, as a matter of speaking, the framework that results in the lack of user protection. How then can these holes be mended, and what are the proposed solutions? In order to resolve this case, this research first understands another framework by which to compare the current US framework. When compared to the US framework, which pieces appear to be missing from the US? By analyzing the results and research of law professionals, the discovery is that the US could benefit from a cohesive law, which would protect the fundamental right of citizens to have private data protection and the proper representation. Additionally, there needs to exist, in the least, one organization which holds authority over individuals who breach this right; the EU refers to these as Independent Supervisory Authorities (ISAs). The implications of these findings highlight the urgency to provide this fundamental right to US citizens. Where the right to privacy fails is to say that there is a fundamental right to have that right protected.
    • The Mediterranean Diet: Could Obese America Eat its Way to a Longer Life?

      Gillenwater, Jordan
      The Mediterranean Diet (MD) is a long-standing form of nutrition that may be partially responsible for the long life-expectancy of European Mediterranean countries. If this diet is capable of increasing longevity, it may be worthy of integration into U.S. culture. This study uses literature to explore the effects of the MD on disease prevention, as avoidance of potentially lethal, non-communicable disease could increase longevity. Nationally prevalent diseases were studied, including obesity, type II diabetes, and COPD, among others. Results indicate that the diet has been linked to lower risk for development of a wide variety of diseases, thus indicating it could lengthen American life expectancy, making it a concern for the governmental, economic, and public health sectors. Some challenges of integration of the MD in U.S. culture were explored in literature. Major obstacles include financial limitations for economically distressed individuals, lack of accessibility, and clashing cultural barriers on diet style. Solutions were investigated and include SNAP reform to lessen financial stress, elimination of food deserts through the “Let’s Move!” campaign, and education of the public sector about the MD. Many challenges exist as barriers for the adoption of the diet in the U.S., and successful integration will require local and federal efforts. While integration will not be easy, significant changes in the future could allow the diet to become a part of U.S. culture. The MD could provide the increasingly obese United States with an opportunity to eat its way to a longer, healthier life.
    • Creating Environmental Education for Children: Focusing on the Vigo County/Terre Haute Community

      Bilyeu, Jordanna
      This study is an attempt to create an action plan to improve environmental education for children within a community. It evaluates the reach and sophistication of this type of education that currently exists in the Vigo County/Terre Haute community, diagnoses weaknesses in the system, and finds ways to develop it. Data was collected through surveys given to elementary school teachers in Vigo County Public schools, interviewing community educators, making on-site visits to educational locations, online research, and speaking with political figures. Environmental education lacks sophistication in schools and can be improved through hands-on, sustainability standards and resources. Community sources outside of schools are limited to university organizations, city and county parks, and museums. The reach of these entities can be improved through advertisement, accessibility, and collaboration. Lastly, initiatives to change legislation can improve the reach and sophistication of environmental education through government-funded environmental programming.
    • Rising Readmission Rates: A national issue

      Anderson, Elaine
      Recently there has been a rise in hospital readmission rates. As a result of this increase in readmissions, the Affordable Healthcare Act (ACA) was implemented to assist in reducing hospital readmissions. This was done by penalizing hospitals for readmissions associated with the Medicare population. Prior to this research, the effect of this legislation on the readmission rate was unknown. Additionally, the different aspects or factors that contributed to an individual’s risk for being readmitted were unclear. Also it was uncertain how a high verses low nurse-to-patient ratio would affect patient outcomes and the readmission rate. Finally, the effects of being hospitalized on the patient were unknown. Both subjective and objective data were evaluated for this research. After extensive research it was found that the readmission rate was declining slightly, but it was still unclear whether the ACA was the cause for this decline. Additionally, it was uncovered that the main factors that contributed to being readmitted included: age, disease, literacy barriers, community support, medication and quality of care. Furthermore, high nurse-to-patient ratios contributed to an increase in a hospital’s readmission rate as a result of a decrease in the quality of care given by the nurse. Finally it was concluded that patients that experience high stress levels are at a greater risk for being readmitted and post invasive care syndrome often occurs post-discharge. In order to prevent readmission it is necessary to collaborate with other health professions to meet the unique needs of each patient.
    • The Experience of College Football and Effects on the Player

      Dachota, Nicholas
      The objective of this thesis will be to analyze the experience of college football and the impacts it has on the player. The main research of this thesis will be to see how playing in college affects the athlete in three major areas of his life. The areas that will be discussed in this thesis will be how the athlete is affected physically, socially, and financially. This thesis will help show the public how much a single sport that athletes have been playing years in college. It truly takes control of their entire life in almost every facet of their lives. This will help show how the student-athlete is more than just a football player for the university but a valued commodity for their respective universities.
    • Dream Job or Money Pit?

      Wilcox, Benjamin
      The path to becoming a lawyer, pilot, or a doctor is a very tough route no matter which profession one should choose. The purpose of this research paper is to determine if all the careers offer the same reward upon completion of education. Does one career earn significantly more money per dollar invested in education? The hope is that this paper will show these inconsistencies and increase awareness of the amount of debt students are piling on. The starting salary of a profession needs to be able to support the debt that must be accrued. Throughout this research paper, there will be a thorough analysis of three professions that will look at the time invested to obtain an education, the money invested, and the difficulty of obtaining the certification for that specific career path. This will show that each career is extremely difficult and thus should be rewarded as such. After this has been accomplished, I will discuss the starting salaries and compare this to the average debt obtained during education. It is my hope to show that some careers are financially much more viable than others, and this needs to be considered before entering the career field.
    • Global Competency Teaching Intercultural Communication and Creativity in Universities to Prepare Graduates For the Global Workforce

      Crawford, Cassidy
      Universities are leaving students vastly unprepared to succeed in the globalized workforce upon graduation, due to a lack of global competency. This article examines the use of intercultural communication and creativity as necessary resources for students to gain global competency. First, global competency is defined. Next, the need for intercultural communication and how this need can be met by universities is discussed in depth. Lastly, the same is done for creativity in the context of the real-world and education. Surveys and statics of employers, professors, and students are applied to this examination. Additionally, methods to integrate intercultural communication and creativity are discussed as well. Major findings reveal that, although challenging, implementing intercultural communication and creativity in universities is desirable and necessary for global competency and student preparedness.
    • Issues and Challenges of Adapting a Creative Work

      Axe, Joshua Q.
      This paper presents an overview of the process of adapting a creative work (i.e., books, films, works of art, etc.) focusing on the unique issues and challenges of bringing two distinctive types of media and persons from different disciplines together to create a successful adaptation. While the nature of adaptation is change, the process to accomplish that transition is complex. This research discusses the media involved, some of the key people involved in the process (and their expectations of the end product), and other factors upon which the success or failure of an adaptation depends. Three main areas examined include how the skill and choices made by the adapter can impact the original work and the adaptation (both positively and negatively), how creative visions can mesh or clash, and whether some creative works should not be changed from their original form. This research study includes numerous articles on the Internet, on-line resources, Library resources, books, television, movies, as well as personal observations of the subject matter. This research can assist a potential adapter or creator of a work in making informed decisions about the viability of undertaking an adaptation project. Further in-depth study should be conducted prior to beginning any project of adaptation, since while some of the issues and challenges are evident and concrete, others are subjective in nature.
    • Disney’s Female Gender Roles: The Change of Modern Culture

      Barber, McKenzie
      Disney Animation and their films are a huge part of the entertainment industry in America. They influence and reach children through many avenues, not just with movies, but through clothing, games, and toys. Disney has been around for over 80 years, and during that time, they have played a role in how society displays gender roles. As modern culture goes through changes, Disney can also be seen making changes in the way they represent their characters, especially females. While looking specifically at Disney princesses, the depiction of females and their gender roles can be described in at least one of three ways. One, the original portrayal of Disney princesses is the stereotypical damsel-in-distress, and very domestic. This can be seen through Snow White, Cinderella, and Sleeping Beauty. A second portrayal arose and shifted the roles of female characters to be seen as rebellious and ambitious. This picture can be seen through the characters of Ariel, Mulan, and Rapunzel. Lastly, a final shift has taken place and the female characters are portrayed as independent and free spirited. This type of depiction can be seen through seen through Merida, Anna and Elsa. Through different researches and literature reviews, including the movies themselves, Disney can be seen slowly making strides along with the surrounding culture and changing times in America.
    • American Culture’s Impact on Gender and The Perpetuation of a Gender Binary

      Blaho, Anna
      This thesis explores the origins of American culture’s fixation on gender being a dichotomous concept. Through the analysis of previous research surrounding the subject of gender roles, expectations, and stereotypes, contributors to this restrictive mind frame as well as reinforcing agents were recognized. Historical trends have demonstrated the assignment of clear and separate tasks to the genders, which in turn created differentiated experiences and opportunities presented to each gender. Facilitated by the historical basis, American culture emulated similar patterns that instilled inflexible conceptions about gender to the point where it has created a discriminate workplace environment. As a consequence of the culture, the American economy uses these gender ideals to increase revenue, disregarding of ethics. These factors combined produce negative effects on American citizens, regardless of how they identify. Comprehensively, the results have established that a rigid format of gender has the ability to limit the opportunities accessible to all genders.
    • Pursuing Legislative Authority for Clinical Social Workers to Provide Private Independent Mental Health Services: What is the Status and What are the Issues?

      Blower, Caroline
      The scope of clinical social work practice differs among the various US states as defined by legislative codes. Understanding these differences is challenging because legislative codes are difficult to read, sometimes requires advanced knowledge to interpret, or do not provide the sufficient breadth and/or depth of information to enable a full understanding of practice limits. The study utilized an electronic survey and asked social workers throughout the US five questions about providing private independent mental health services. These questions addressed the ability of licensed clinical social workers (LCSWs) to (1) provide diagnosis, (2) create treatment plans, (3) bill third party insurance, (4) bill Medicaid, and (5) bill Medicare. Results indicated that LCSWs in at least 32 states reported ability to provide all five services independently and privately; 17 states whose respondents reported conflictual or uncertain ability to provide one or more of the services; and two states whose respondents reported inability to provide one or more of the services. Fortunately, respondents from no states reported inability to provide all the services. The conflictual or uncertain responses likely arise from complications or restrictions in scope of practice in some states and in understanding evolving definitions of private and independent practice.
    • Acidic and Basic Destruction of Tissues

      Eaton, Cydney
      A coroner’s case I had learned about involved a man attempting to dispose of a body with acid. Shortly after exposure, the man was apprehended and the body was located. Upon investigation, police force determined the acid used to be hydrochloric acid, however, exact concentration remains unknown (Kohr, 2010). This led to the question of which easily accessible acid works best to degrade tissue. To answer this, an experiment was conducted involving pig feet and various concentrations of common acids and a single strong base. The feet were submerged in the solutions overnight and mass percent lost or gained was calculated. Analysis showed that hydrochloric acid did, in fact, destroy the tissue the most, but at its highest concentration. This proved our hypothesis of nitric acid degrading the tissues the most to be incorrect. The acid used by the perpetrator was most likely at a concentration between 6 and 12 M. More acid as well as a larger container would have proved him to be more successful.
    • The Effects of Police Work on Family Life

      Spicer, Mercedes
      The job of a police officer is full of stressors, and these stressors can have an effect not only the police officer, but on the officer’s family as well. The main stressors police officers have to deal with are violence, time management, promotion, education, finances, and many different emotions. All of these stressors can lead to a disaster without proper treatment to diffuse the stress. Some ways that officers can get help is by having a religion, going to therapy, talking to a chaplain, and there are even several different ways that the spouse can help the officer dealing with stress.
    • Hypertension Patient Compliance

      Myers, Taylor
      Hypertension is a prevalent condition in the United States that often has many comorbidities. It is usually asymptomatic, so patients are less likely to comply with treatment if they feel healthy. This is a growing concern due to the complications that can arise from hypertension. Hypertension can be associated with a lower quality of life in patients that have symptoms. However, in patients that do not show symptoms they may feel that they have a higher quality of life by not changing their preexisting habits. The reasons for patient noncompliance will be studied as well as interventions to increase compliance, related health problems, and how hypertension affects the quality of life. A literature review was done in order to determine the effects of hypertension on the patients’ quality of life. The majority of studies found that patient compliance does lead to a higher quality of life in hypertension patients. This is because it can prevent other health problems from arising. Also, the patients that continued their preexisting habits rated their overall quality of life higher, but their physical quality of life lower.
    • Illegal Recruitment: A Self-Implosion and Corruption of the NCAA

      Jewell, Andrew
      Today’s high school/amateur athletes continue to get bigger, faster and stronger with every collegiate recruiting class. It would be easy to assume with more and more athletes having this type of ability that colleges would be on a more level playing field. That assumption is terribly wrong. The death penalty/capital punishment as defined by the Merriam-Webster Dictionary can be defined in short as: being sentenced to execution by a court of law for crimes committed (Capital Punishment). In collegiate sports, the death penalty has been enacted once and only once because of the ramifications that it had on the program. Why was the program given such a harsh penalty? Two words: illegal recruitment. Illegal recruitment, in short, can be defined by the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) as athletes receiving improper benefits from colleges, boosters (wealthy alumni donors to the university) or coaches to influence potential athletes to come and play for their respective athletic teams. Another thing destroying the NCAA are professional sports agents and scouts for professional sports teams. They continue to convince these young athletes to become a professional athlete at younger and younger ages. In this world money talks and when an agent or scout puts money in front of these young athletes’ faces, it is very often hard for them to turn it down. Often, these athletes do not come from the best situations, so they want to provide their respective families with the lives they have always wanted. Part of the NCAA’s mission statement is to provide fair opportunities to all athletes at all levels and illegal recruitment, as well as professional scouts and agents, are contributing to a tear down of not only a destruction of the NCAA’s mission but also selfimplosion of the NCAA as well. With student- athletes wanting more, it gives these boosters, scouts and agents giving these illegal gifts, that support bigger universities, more opportunities to recruit high profile athletes with ease, which is giving smaller colleges and universities no chance to compete (especially at the division one level) and is causing corruption in the NCAA and is not keeping the playing field level.
    • Due Process in Higher Education: A Study of Due Process in Relation to Greek Life Affairs

      Hollis, Brooklyn M.
      Fraternities have blazed headlines over the past several years due to incidents involving degrading and racist chants, private Facebook groups bragging about illicit behavior, and in several cases, allegations of sexual assault. This project serves to investigate the constitutional rights of Fraternities and Sororities during investigative and disciplinary procedures. A major concern that this project explores is whether organizations are protected under the 14th Amendment of the Constitution in university disciplinary procedures. This project provides a thorough discussion of the history of Greek organizations and their significance. It also conducts an exhaustive review of the 14th Amendment’s Due Process Clause and how it applies to universities through their established Student Code of Conduct1. This piece investigates Student Code of Conduct policies from sixteen college campuses in the Midwest to determine how sanctions are delivered to student organizations; half of the universities require student organizations to be punished in the same way as individual students. Three universities have separate policies or have clauses that determine how organizations should be punished. This project also provides an in-depth look into the growing trend of the Court system not finding the University to be responsible if they are sued as a result of an incident involving a Greek organizations.
    • Nutrition and the Effects on Student Behavior and Academic Performance in the Classroom

      Daniel, Kaitlin
      Nutrition, behavior, and academic performance; these three words have a few commonalities. They each can be related to children. They each can be related to school and they each can be related to issues in education. The following research has found intriguing statistics that are useful when investigating or planning a classroom climate. It has always been said that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It jumpstarts the metabolism and awakens he body. Along with this it helps curb the appetite before lunch. An early addition to school nutrition was the availability of breakfast before school. This was a benefit for students because it created less of a gap for those who did not have food at home and those that did. Behavior can be a trying issue in the classroom. Students who struggle with behavior are students who need extra help. There are many reasons that a student may struggle with negative behavior but, working 8 hours on school work on an empty stomach does not help the matters any. Hunger does not help with brain functionality or behavior. The studies cited provide evidence that while hunger and unhealthy eating habits are not the sole reason behind poor behavior and negative academic performance it does not help the matter either. Studies showed that students who were hungry or did not have adequate nutrition struggled greater at focusing and on short term recall than those students who were well nourished. By completing a search and literature review there was an outstanding amount of data and statistics to base a sound outcome.
    • The Effects of Music on Education and Early Literacy: An Insight on Defining Literacy and the Use of Music in the Classroom

      Hawkins, Lindsey
      The purpose of this essay is to examine the effects that music has on education and literacy, and to provide insight on how to go about using music in a classroom. First, the essay will define the word ‘literacy,’ and prove why this is important, and then describe how literacy is taught in a classroom using phonics. Then, it will take a look at how music affects the student brain, and how those effects are linked directly to the way students process reading, writing, and communication. Finally, this essay will look at the direct effects that music has on education and literacy, and how both music instruction and music integrated into a lesson correlate positively with student academic success. It will also take a moment to provide examples of how music can be effectively implemented in a traditional classroom setting. To conclude, the essay considers how this study affects other aspects of education such as the idea of extra-curricular activities, standardized testing, and students with disabilities.
    • Illicit Drugs: Should they be legalized? Can technology and regulation make them safer?

      Ketcham III, Max Lee
      For many years America has been the leading force in substance prohibition. Many countries blindly follow the USA in an attempt to earn their respect. As a result, very few countries actually know what uses these illicit substances have; before it ever reached the hands of the right people, the wrong people take it, use it incorrectly, and leave a bad name on that substance forever. If people could slander a substance, America would end up being found the main conspirator in the slanderous lies and misconceptions! This study has been done in an attempt to clear the name of most illicit drugs to pave a path towards legalization. This path will require tumultuous amounts of research, experimentation, and education. Once that path is complete, a marked path should begin continuing education to the public and beginning regulation and sale of all illicit drugs.
    • Multiple Sclerosis and the Benefits of Exercise

      Lovelace, Sydney P
      In this report, the effects that exercise has on multiple sclerosis are presented. Types, symptoms, and treatment options are described in order to give a clear understanding of the disease. The modes of exercise and the benefits that each mode holds will be explained and applied to the life of one living with multiple sclerosis. There will more attention toward resistance exercise, yoga, and tai chi as forms of exercise. Along with the benefits, the ways that poor posture and balance will be identified. With this information, the reader will gain an understanding about how identifying issues in posture and balance can lead to easier exercise prescription. Multiple studies and research have been conducted in order to further explain how exercise will impact a person living with MS. With this research, new forms of exercise, such as tai-chi, have surfaced and provided benefits to those living with MS. Also, there is data presented on topics such as the use of a force platform to identify balance control, pre and post-test scores for tai-chi intervention, and how a flight-time camera works. All of this information leads to the main idea of the thesis, which is that exercise has a positive effect on multiple sclerosis patients and could potentially slow down the progression of the disease.