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dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Randolph B.
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-14T19:50:45Z
dc.date.available2019-08-14T19:50:45Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10484/12359
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates the impact of concurrent design on the cost growth and schedule growth of US Department of Defense Major Defense Acquisition Systems (MDAPs). It is motivated by the question of whether employment of concurrent design in the development of a major weapon system will produce better results in terms of cost and schedule than traditional serial development methods. Selected Acquisition Reports were used to determine the cost and schedule growth of MDAPs as well as the degree of concurrency employed. Two simple linear regression analyses were used to determine the degree to which cost growth and schedule growth vary with concurrency. The results were somewhat surprising in that for major weapon systems the utilization of concurrency as it was implemented in the programs under study was shown to have no effect on cost performance, and that performance to development schedule, one of the purported benefits of concurrency, was actually shown to deteriorate with increases in concurrency. These results, while not an indictment of the concept of concurrency, indicate that better practices and methods are needed in the implementation of concurrency in major weapon systems. The findings are instructive to stakeholders in the weapons acquisition process in their consideration of whether and how to employ concurrent design strategies in their planning of new weapons acquisition programs.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State Universityen_US
dc.subjectDefenseen_US
dc.subjectManufacturingen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECTIVENESS OF CONCURRENT DESIGN ON THE COST AND SCHEDULE PERFORMANCE OF DEFENSE WEAPONS SYSTEM ACQUISITIONSen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-06-02T13:56:01Z


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