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dc.contributor.authorKirkland, David P.
dc.date.accessioned2023-04-20T18:42:14Z
dc.date.available2023-04-20T18:42:14Z
dc.date.issued2021-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10484/13940
dc.description.abstractCOVID-19 created a support problem for public universities across the United States and required that IT departments and professionals alter how they performed in 2020, and perhaps beyond. IT professionals tasked with safeguarding large amounts of data were required to shift to a teleworking posture to continue offering a similar level of service as previously expected. In addition to the technological shift that organizations experienced because of COVID-19, leadership challenges also impacted IT departments across the United States. The rapid shift of operational duties has the propensity to increase technology-related stress, due to employee perception of being successful in their role. The purpose of this quantitative, non-experimental, correlational pilot study was to examine the relationship between technostress, job satisfaction, burnout, and demographic characteristics of age, gender, and years of experience of an IT professional working in higher education. This pilot study included a convenience sample of IT professionals from a single public university in the United States and an online survey was administered to discover the impact operational shifts have on levels of technostress, job satisfaction, and job burnout. To be considered, the respondent had to meet specific criteria: (a) be an adult of at least 18 years of age, (b) work as an IT professional within the university, and (c) work for a minimum of one year as an IT professional. The sample of 116 potential respondents were emailed to request participation in the study. There were 46 survey submissions received (roughly 40% of likely respondents). Of those surveys received, there were 31 completed cases (approximately 27%), which were analyzed using multiple linear regression. Results of this study suggested there was no predictive relationship of technostress on job satisfaction. However, results did show decreased job satisfaction for demographic characteristics, such as age. Additionally, there was no overall predictive relationship of technostress on job burnout, however, results suggest that compared with people over 55, people who were between 35-44 experienced increased burnout overall.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherIndiana State Universityen_US
dc.subjectTechnostressen_US
dc.subjectOrganizational Cultureen_US
dc.subjectJob Satisfactionen_US
dc.subjectBurnouten_US
dc.titleORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE: AN EXAMINATION OF THE ROLE OF LEADERSHIP IN NEUTRALIZING THE NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF TECHNOSTRESS DURING OPERATIONAL SHIFTSen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
refterms.dateFOA2023-04-20T18:42:14Z


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