• Eugene Victor Debs : the Kansas years

      Grooms, Marvin (1970-05)
      Not Available
    • AGE DEPENDENCE OF SPIRAL GRAIN IN WHITE OAKS (QUERCUS ALBA) IN SOUTHCENTRAL ILLINOIS

      Rauchfuss, Julia (Cunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute, Indiana State University, 2004-12)
      Spiral grain, the alignment of wood fibers (trachejds) to the longitudinal axis of h·ees, is thought to be an indicator of old age and is a phenomenon that has been only stndied with destrnctive sampling methods (cutting down trees). In this study, the usefulness of non-fatal sampling methods and existing methods to quantify spiral grain patterns in Jiving and dead deciduous trees are examined, particularly in white oaks (Qi1ercus alba). 111e overall goal is to detem1ine if spiral grain growth is a reasonable indicator of h·ee age. Methods that were tested included the use of a 12 mm increment borer (non-fatal sampling method) and Brazier's method ( 1965) of analyzing grain angles along just one diagonal to get a representative grain angle for the whole circumference at a certain height on a tree. The 12 mm increment borer did not produce consistent results in this study; therefore, . destructive sampling is necessary to study spiral grain in white oaks. Brazier's method (1965) should not be used in white oaks and should not be applied universally to all tree species. Samples from living and dead trees vary in severity and direction of spiral grain. The climatic factors that are roost limiting to tree growth do not influence spiral grain growth in white oaks in this stand. Severe spiral grain does in general seem to be an indicator of age in white oaks, although most trees have severe left spiral grain and not right spiral grain. However, a tree without severe spiral grain is not necessarily young. To judge the severity of spiral grain, grain angles have to be examined in the outermost layer of the wood and not in the bark.
    • Beautiful Misery

      Boyer, Natalie (2008-04-01)
      Within moments of suffering, beauty emerges and manifests itself into forms that we do not fully recognize. We become willful, dependant, and most of all the accepting of our human frailty. I choose to present portraits that represent this idea of suffering as being human and unique. I do not seek to overwhelm my viewer with sadness and despair, but rather to open my viewer's eyes to what suffering may reveal. As a society, we are generally numb to the tragedy that may befall others. Some apply an invisible shield and a mask of glamour to conceal what they believe may resemble suffering and defeat. Our natural inclination is to present to each other an image of our own perfection, as stable and immortal beings. In reality, we analyze ourselves and recognize natures defeat every day when we look in the mirror, Great measure is taken to conceal any sign of aging, stress personal ailments, and the inevitable death. My models represent this struggle with life, yet without any concealment. Their troubles are laid before the viewers, as human as they may be.
    • In Partial Fulfillment of the M.F.A. Degree Requirements

      Báez, Daniela (2008-04-28)
      I have always had an inclination towards taking pictures. When I was young the first object I bought with my first savings was a simple automatic camera. I remember reading the entire manual so I would be able to use the camera properly. I took pictures of my family and friends all the time. I would send the roll to the Kodak store to be developed and I would show the pictures to everyone. I continued taking general pictures as I grew up, but I never really did anything beyond that.
    • Predicting schools' performance in the state examinations : a model for Shaba province in Zaire

      Maloba, Ngoba (2009-08-26)
      The purpose of the study were (1) to ascertain for Literature major, Mathematics-Physics major, and General Pedagogy major, the significance of the relationship between the school's performance in each required course and their overall performance in the State Examinations; (2) to investigate for each major the significance of the relationship between the school's performance in all the required courses and their overall performance in the State Examinitations; (3) to develop for each major, a prediction equation to be used to predict school's performance in the State Examinitations; and (4) to analyze the degree of concordance, across teh three majors, in the ways courses common to them correlated with the State Examinations. A total of 58 rural and urban schools from Shaba Province were used in this study. Twelve offered Literature major and presented 275 candidates, sixteen offered Mathematics-Physics major and had 300 candidates, and twenty-eight offeredd General-Pedagogy major with 935 candidates. All these schools participated in the State Examinations in June 1976. A correlation matrix was developed for each major, using the Statistical Package for the Social Science (S.P.S.S). In this matrix each variable was compared singly with the other variables. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were completed for each major, in order to identify courses contributing significantly to the school's performance in the State Examinations. The results of these analyses were used to develop, for each major, an equation to be used to predit school's performance in the State Examinations. A multiple correlation coefficient was computed for each major, to test for the signigicance of the relationship between the school's performance in all the required coursed and their overall performance in the State Examinations. A kendall's coefficient of concordance was computed and its significance tested. The following findings were established from the analyses: 1. In each major, certain required courses contributed significantly to school's performance in the State Examinations. 2. The overall correlation in each major, between the school's performance in all the required courses and their performance in the State Examinations was significant. 3. A prediction equation was developed for each major. 4. The courses common to the three majors did not contribut to the school's performance, in the same way, across the three majors.
    • Website Compliance with Ethical Guidelines by Psychologists and Professional Counselors

      Yazvac III, Joseph (2009-08-26)
      There is currently very little research investigating the ethical practice of e-therapy, and none that distinguishes between types of therapists in terms of their compliance with ethical codes pertaining to e-therapy. The American Psychological Association does not have ethical standards specific to the provision of e-therapy but the American Counseling Association does. The purpose of this study was to assess differences in ethical compliance for e-therapy websites sponsored by psychologists and e-therapy websites sponsored by professional counselors. Specific ethics codes for the practice of e-therapy of the American Counseling Association were used to generate an assessment instrument, which served as the measure of ethical compliance for both groups. E-therapy websites primarily sponsored by psychologists or professional counselors were located by predetermined search terms through the Google search engine and then evaluated for compliance. A MANOVA was then conducted to analyze differences between the two groups on compliance with sections A.12.a., A.12.g., and A.12.h. of the American Counseling Association Ethics Code, as well as an aggregate total of all three. Professional counselors were found to be significantly more compliant than psychologists with section A.12.h. and the aggregate total of all sections. However, compliance rates for both groups were generally low, and implications are discussed.
    • An Investigation of the Reliability and Validity of the Caperton Forgiveness Styles Inventory

      Caperton, Duane (2009-08-26)
      This research was an investigation into the process of forgiveness. The analysis of qualitative interviews with nearly 100 participants suggested four different approaches, or styles, of forgiving and non-forgiving. The Intrapersonal style describes people who forgive other people by focusing on their own thoughts, feelings, and actions. The Interpersonal style describes people who forgive other people by focusing on the thoughts, feelings, and actions of the offending persons. The Easy Going style describes the people who never forgive anyone because they rarely or never feel offended and consequently rarely or never feel the need to forgive others. The Grudge Holder style describes people who rarely or never forgive anyone because they generally prefer to hold on to the offense for various reasons. The 26 item Pilot CFSI inventory was investigated for reliability and for convergent and divergent validity in a sample composed of 131 undergraduate and graduate students. Cronbachs’ alphas of the scales showed the Pilot Caperton Forgiveness Style Inventory (CFSI) inventory to be internally consistent. Multiple regressions of CFSI scale results with IPIP Five Factor Model of Personality inventories, Fear-of-Intimacy relationship anxiety inventories, and demographic information demonstrated appropriate divergent validity for the scales. These results along with a varimax rotation factor analysis led to an 18 item Revised CFSI and a three item Humility scale which clearly mediated the forgiving process in some as yet to be determined way and was wholly unrelated to the non- iv forgiving styles. The Intrapersonal forgivers tended to score high on Openness and somewhat higher on Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. They also scored low on fear of intimate relationships. Individuals who reported being “very active in religion” were the only group which showed a preference for the Intrapersonal style. The Interpersonal forgivers tended to score high on Neuroticism, Extroversion, and Conscientiousness, and they also tended to score low on fear of intimate relationships. The Easy Going non-forgivers scored low on Neuroticism, but scored high on fear of intimate relationships. Males were more likely to score high on Easy Going than any other demographic group. The Grudge Holders tended to score high on Neuroticism and low on Agreeableness, and they were high on fear of intimate relationships. The Caperton Forgiveness Style Inventory is a valid and reliable assessment tool of styles of forgiveness and is appropriate for both clinical and research uses.
    • The Effectiveness of Chronic Disease Management for People with Diabetes Mellitus

      Southard, Erik (2009-08-26)
      The primary goal of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an evidence-based chronic disease management program at improving various health outcome indicators in diabetic patients in a rural Indiana community. A secondary data analysis was completed on data extracted from an electronic databases at the Clay City Center for Family Medicine (CCFMC). The health outcome indicators, glycosylated hemoglobin, urine microalbumin, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein data were taked from 49 patient records at various time points. Patient data from enrollment, 6 month, and 12-month time points were analyzed using paired t-tests and inferential statistics to determine the protocol's ability to facilitate improvements in health outcome indicators. Main outcome measures and results were as follows: 6 months after enrollment at CCFMC, those participants with available results (n=32) had a mean decrease in glycosylated hemoglobin from 8.38 to 7.71. The glycosylated hemoglobin levels for persons with data available at the 12-monty time point (n=35) decreased from 8.17 to 7.52. While these levels were not statistically significant, clinical relevance can be established. Six months after enrollment in the CCFMC disease management program persons with available data (n=14) had a mean reduction in LDL from 137.43 to 122.71 (p=.046). Twelve months after enrollment persons with data available (n=16) had a mean reduction in LDL from 134.19 to 107.13 (p<.001). Upon enrollment only 44.1% of persons had blood pressure under the ADA guideline of 130/80mmHg. At the 6-month time point, 48.0% of persons had blood pressure under the 130/80mmHg parameters. At the 12-month time point, 41.9% had diastolic pressures under 130/80mmHg. Analysis of completion rates revealed that urine microalbumin were recorded on 46.9% if subjects at either baseline time 1 or time 2. Of subjects in the study 83.7% had an LDL recorded. Glycosylated hemoglobin was documented in 95.9% of subjects in the study. A multitude of protocol adherence issues were noted in the process of evaluation. Our results show that, in the short term, chronic disease management protocols can result in improvements in health outcome indicators specific to diabetes.
    • Toiling in the vineyards : A study of two nineteenth century religious communities in the Midwest

      Fife, Camille (2009-08-26)
      This study looks at two nineteenth century southern Indian sites founded by European women's religious communities to serve immigrant families in the New World: Saint Mary-of-the-Woods, Indiana, founded in 1840 by the French Sisters of Providence and the monastery of the Sisters of St. Benedict of Ferdinand, Indiana, established in 1867 by nuns of German origin. An introduction develops the historicial context for nineteenth century immigration to North America and relevant trends in nineteeth century Catholicism as well as the history of Catholic settlement in the Midwest. The study concentrates on each site's physical evolution, divided into periods of significance. Developments dictated by natural conditions, pioneer practices and possible European influence are discussed. Factors such as existing conditions, specifics of religious orientation, personalities and ethnic differences are compared. The study concludes that development was not random and the both sites demonstrated high degree of retention and/or replication of their mother culture.
    • The Elephant's Year

      Alharbi, Mohammed (2010)
      My faith of Islam and the Holy Qur'an guides my design creativity. I like to teach others about my faith, and I found 30 animation is a great way for that. The Holy Qur'an is full of lessons, wisdoms, scientific facts, advising historical stories, future predictions, social solutions, etc. The Holy Qur'an asks people to believe in God and the Prophet Mohammed. I chose a story from the Holy Qur'an that talks about the Holy Kaaba, which was the first religion place for God
    • 422

      Chen, Ming-Chia (2010)
      422 (pronounced "four two two"), is a prototype of a coffee shop which is named after Earth Day, April 22nd_ It is not just a coffee shop. 422 is a coffee shop with a theme: global warming. The concept of the coffee shop is to create a place for people to drink and discuss issues of global warming by providing inviting yet thought provoking ambience with graphics, videos, and eco-friendly furniture.
    • Classification of Urban features using Airborne Hyperspectral Data

      Babu, Bharath Ganesh (2010-05-11)
      Accurate mapping and modeling of urban environments are critical for their efficient and successful management. Superior understanding of complex urban environments is made possible by using modern geospatial technologies. This research focuses on thematic classification of urban land use and land cover (LULC) using 248 bands of 2.0 meter resolution hyperspectral data acquired from an airborne imaging spectrometer (AISA+) on 24th July 2006 in and near Terre Haute, Indiana. Three distinct study areas including two commercial classes, two residential classes, and two urban parks/recreational classes were selected for classification and analysis. Four commonly used classification methods – maximum likelihood (ML), extraction and classification of homogeneous objects (ECHO), spectral angle mapper (SAM), and iterative self organizing data analysis (ISODATA) - were applied to each data set. Accuracy assessment was conducted and overall accuracies were compared between the twenty four resulting thematic maps. With the exception of SAM and ISODATA in a complex commercial area, all methods employed classified the designated urban features with more than 80% accuracy. The thematic classification from ECHO showed the best agreement with ground reference samples. The residential area with relatively homogeneous composition was classified consistently with highest accuracy by all four of the classification methods used. The average accuracy amongst the classifiers was 93.60% for this area. When individually observed, the complex recreational area (Deming Park) was classified with the highest accuracy by ECHO, with an accuracy of 96.80% and 96.10% Kappa. The average accuracy amongst all the classifiers was 92.07%. The commercial area with relatively high complexity was classified with the least accuracy by all classifiers. The lowest accuracy was achieved by SAM at 63.90% with 59.20% Kappa. This was also the lowest accuracy in the entire analysis. This study demonstrates the potential for using the visible and near infrared (VNIR) bands from AISA+ hyperspectral data in urban LULC classification. Based on their performance, the need for further research using ECHO and SAM is underscored. The importance incorporating imaging spectrometer data in high resolution urban feature mapping is emphasized.
    • Optimal Experience in Relationships, Activities, and Beyond: Connecting Flow with Self-Expansion

      Dean, Brandy M. (2010-05-11)
      Flow is a state of optimal experience characterized by complete immersion in an enjoyable activity and has been associated with positive experience in activities. Self-expansion is a state of increase in the diversity and complexity of the self and has been linked with positive experience in relationships. Despite phenomenological similarities, the connection between these two states has not been examined. The current study used a correlational design to explore the degrees of overlap between these states by comparing them in general, situation-specific, and predictive contexts. It was expected that flow and self-expansion would occur at similar frequencies, be produced by similar situations, be positively correlated within given activities and relationships, similarly predict attraction to other within a given relationship, and be similarly predicted by a personality trait. Results indicated that these experiences do tend to cooccur. Among students reporting both experiences, the frequencies of the experiences were positively related, although flow experiences were reported as more frequent. Flow and selfexpansion experiences were produced by similar sources across activities and relationships, and students tended to specify the same type of activity or relationship as the source of both experiences. As expected, flow and self-expansion were positively related within a given activity and within a given relationship. Both flow and self-expansion experienced in a relationship were positively related to attraction to the other, although the relationship between self-expansion and attraction was stronger than the relationship between flow and attraction. Neither flow nor self expansion experienced in an activity was related to trait happiness, and there was no significant difference between these correlations. These results are reviewed in the context of previous research, and implications for theory, research, and practice are discussed. Finally, considerations for future research comparing these two theories, as well as other varieties of positive experience, are discussed.
    • A Program Evaluation: Therapeutic Playgroup for Preschool-Aged Children with Mental Health Needs

      Harden, Denise M. (2010-05-11)
      The understanding of preschool children has been explored in the fields of developmental psychology and early childhood education. The field of school psychology has also increased interest in the assessment of the social and emotional functioning of preschool children (Martin, 1986). Currently, there are changes in national education policy and societal pressures for systematic, professional assessment and intervention with younger children (Executive Office of the President, 1990). In addition, focus has been placed on the incorporation of evidence-based practices into assessment and treatment (Tolan & Dodge, 2005). Mental health services, in particular, aim to address the social and emotional needs of children and families through assessment, effective intervention, and collaboration/consultation. Currently, research in preschool programs specifies the use of a developmental model to meet children’s social-emotional needs, physical well-being, motor development, language and literacy development, cognition and general knowledge, and approach to learning (National Institute for Early Education Research, 2006). This study extends the literature on effective and comprehensive mental health programs for a preschool aged population by conducting a program evaluation on the effectiveness of a therapeutic playgroup model for providing mental health services to preschool aged children who exhibit social-emotional and behavioral problems due to family stress, abuse, neglect, and possible mental disorders of children and their caregivers. This study utilizes a mixed method design which incorporates data from caregivers, playgroup teachers, child records, and participantobservers. Findings indicate the effectiveness of the Therapeutic Playgroup Program in meeting the behavioral needs of preschool children, as well as overall program goals and objectives. Teacher efficacy was directly linked to effective and efficient behavior and practices in providing mental health services to young children with challenging behaviors.
    • Disorders of Extreme Stress, Not Otherwise Specified, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Borderline Personality Disorder: A Vignette Study Exploring Clinicians' Diagnostic Perceptions

      Knowles, Awen (2010-05-11)
      Research suggests that some individuals who suffer invasive, early childhood trauma develop significant character pathology, and may meet the criteria for both Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Trauma researchers have proposed a new diagnostic category for these individuals, called Disorders of Extreme Stress, Not Otherwise Specified (DESNOS), also known as Complex PTSD. The present study compared clinicians’ symptom ratings for two case vignettes to determine if DESNOS was a better description of the cases than PTSD, BPD, or comorbid PTSD/BPD. Additionally, potential sex bias in diagnosis was examined by manipulating the sex of the client in the vignette, and examining effects of participant sex. A national sample of 123 licensed psychologists completed the study online. The participants read both vignettes, rated the symptoms in each case, and assigned a diagnosis. The hypothesis that DESNOS would receive higher mean symptom ratings than PTSD, BPD, or comorbid PTSD/BPD was not supported. PTSD and BPD each received higher mean symptom ratings than DESNOS in Vignette A, but in Vignette B there were no significant differences in the symptom ratings. The hypothesis that sex of the client in the vignette would influence the diagnosis of BPD was not supported in Vignette A, but was supported in Vignette B, in which all BPD diagnoses were assigned to the female case. The hypothesis that female participants would endorse higher PTSD diagnostic ratings than would male participants was not supported. However, female participants assigned higher PTSD symptom ratings, and endorsed more of the symptoms of PTSD for Vignette A than did male participants, suggesting that the women attended more to the trauma history in the case. Overall, the study provided limited support for the construct of DESNOS. Limitations of the methodology, implications of the findings, and directions for future research are discussed.
    • Professional Psychology Training Programs: Program Interventions and Prediction of Doctoral Student Stress and Life Satisfaction

      Montgomery, Crista (2010-05-11)
      A growing literature on professional training and practice of psychology advocates that psychologists must be educated on risks and effects of impairment and the importance of self-care. Despite the general recognition of the importance of these issues, they have not been incorporated into training standards such as the American Psychological Association (APA) Guidelines and Principles of Accreditation (2007). In order to assess the approaches that programs currently adopt to address impairment and self-care, this study extended and updated previous research. A large sample of students (n = 591) enrolled in APA accredited doctoral training programs in professional psychology completed surveys regarding their training in self-care and impairment. Trainee well-being was also measured using satisfaction and stress (both professional and personal) scales. How interventions vary by program type was examined. Results showed that psychology trainee reports of professional and personal well-being were consistent with those of similar populations, such as other doctoral students (Pavot & Diener, 1993) and medical students (Firth, 1986). The respondents’ relationship status was not significantly associated with ratings of professional well-being, but partnered individuals scored higher on personal well-being measures. Also, professional satisfaction was higher in younger students and second year students endorsed significantly higher professional stress than first years. The most common interventions students reported receiving were focused primarily on enhancing relational skills and providing of interpersonal support. Programs differed somewhat in the type of interventions they employ to address student well-being. The majority of students reported a desire for their program to increase the amount of interventions offered. Implications, limitations, and suggestions for future research are explored.
    • Stressful Life Events and Interpersonal, Religious, and Spiritual Changes

      Murdock, Paul (2010-05-11)
      Survivors of stressful life events and traumatic experiences often report positive psychological changes “...as a result of the struggle with highly challenging life circumstances” (Tedeschi & Calhoun, 2004, p. 1). Three often reported areas of growth include having a greater appreciation for life in general, new priorities, and an increased significance placed on interpersonal, spiritual or religious issues. Despite reports of positive changes, the literature on stress-related growth (SRG) is inconclusive as to whether SRG is an illusion or represents actual change. For example, no studies to date appear to use longitudinal data, objective indictors, or behavioral measures of change. Thus, the goal of the present study is to use longitudinal data to examine if individuals who report experiencing stressful events place a greater emphasis on interpersonal, religious and spiritual concerns. 556 students at Indiana State University responded to questionnaires at three different time periods (i.e. before entering college, and again in the spring of their freshman and sophomore years). Questionnaires related to stressful events, religious, spiritual, and interpersonal behaviors were selected and include Commitment Components Items (i.e. Altruistic Life Goals and Personal Growth Life Goals), the Organizational Religiousness Short Form, Brief Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale, FACIT-Sp Meaning & Peace Subscale, Life Attitude Profile Will to Meaning subscale, and Positive and Negative religious coping (RCOPE). Hierarchical regression analyses were performed to determine if they predict changes on the dependent variables.Results show that individuals who reported experiencing a variety of stressful life events showed few positive changes on a variety of interpersonal, religious, and spiritual measures. Results also suggested that females and African Americans reported more positive change when compared to males and Caucasians. Potential reasons for the lack of stress leading to growth are discussed as well as limitations of the study and future directions.
    • Attention-Deficit/hyperactivity Disorder and Sleep Disturbances: Consideration of Familial Influences

      Noble, Gretchen Stuckert (2010-05-11)
      The present study examined the extent to which parenting influences problems with sleep in children referred for an evaluation of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Data was collected from parents and/or legal guardians of sixty-three 4- to 12-year old children referred for assessment at an ADHD Evaluation Clinic located at a Midwestern university. Previous literature linking sleep problems to ADHD has typically derived from community and pediatric sleep clinic samples and has largely overlooked children with sub-clinical sleep impairments and/or those whose sleep problems stem from alternate etiologies. More than 60% of parents/caregivers in the current study reported significant child sleep difficulties. As hypothesized, parenting (as related to the implementation of daily routines) added to the explained variance in sleep problems above and beyond the variance explained by an ADHD diagnosis. However, neither parent use of routines nor parenting stress were significant individual predictors of child sleep problems. Parent report of child internalizing symptomology, but not externalizing symptomology, was significantly correlated with reported problems with sleep. The present results suggest that children who display behaviors associated with anxiety and depression may be particularly likely to exhibit sleep difficulties and that evaluation of sleep difficulties should include consideration of parenting practices (i.e., lack of consistent sleep routines). Given the high percentage of sleep problems reported, current results also suggest that screening for sleep disturbances should be a routine part of child assessment.
    • The Impact of Cooperative Video Games on Team Cohesion

      Anderson, Greg (2010-07-20)
      In today’s economy, productivity and efficiency require collaboration between employees. In order to improve collaboration the factors affecting teamwork must be examined to identify where changes can be made in order to increase performance. One factor contributing to teamwork is team cohesion and represents a process whereby members are joined by a common bond in the pursuit of a common objective. A popular social bonding activity sweeping the world is playing cooperative video games. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of playing cooperative video games on team cohesion. Subjects (N=56) were randomly placed into 15 teams of three to four members. A modified Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ) pretest was administered to determine the initial degree of cohesiveness between team members and to examine a wide cross-section of correlates and cohesiveness. Each team was randomly assigned to a specific intervention length of either one or three weeks with the one week groups playing for one hour and the three week groups playing for six hours. After the randomly assigned length of game play was completed, team members completed the modified GEQ posttest. The results of the posttest were compared with the pretest to determine the effect on the team’s cohesion. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics (means and standard deviations) and a 2 x 2 MANCOVA was used to determine if playing collaborative video games affected the level of cohesion. A mixed design was used as post hoc analyses for each GEQ cohesive factor and indicated that levels of cohesion increased due to the intervention but was not dependent upon the length of the intervention. The results of this analysis indicated that video games can be used as a team building experience to improve cohesion regardless of how long the video game is played.