• Dynamic Warm-Up Effect on 5-Km Performance and Running Economy in Collegiate Cross-Country Runners

      Wunderlich, Adriane (2012-10-19)
      The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a dynamic warm-up on running economy (RE) and 5-km performance compared to a control protocol in collegiate cross-country runners. Fifteen male cross-country runners underwent both a half-mile warm-up run at 65% VO2max followed by either a dynamic stretching protocol or a control protocol. After the protocols, subjects completed a 5-km performance for evaluation of RE and performance. Sit-and-reach scores were recorded both before and after each protocol. RE was measured as the total calories expended during each 5-km and performance time was recorded. There was no significant interaction for the sit-and-reach. After the dynamic warm-up the sit-and-reach did not significantly increase (29.10 ± 13.66 to 31.23 ±12.42cm; p>0.05) and did not significantly increase after the control protocol (29.08± 12.7 to 29.00± 13.46cm; p>0.05). Also, values post-dynamic drills were not significantly greater than those for the control protocol (p>0.05). Running economy was not statistically different across conditions (dynamic: 234 ± 26kcals; control: 239 ± 25kcals ;p>0.05). There was no significant difference found among 5-km performance time (dynamic: 18 minutes, 0 seconds ± 52.52; control: 18 minutes, 26 seconds ± 55.00 seconds; p>0.05). These findings suggest that dynamic stretching does not increase hamstring flexibility nor affect RE or performance in NCAA male distance runners.
    • Self-efficacy and health value among undergraduates following a lifetime fitness course.

      Brown, Heather M (2012-04-20)
      The question of whether perceived self-efficacy for exercise and health value,respectively,varied as a function of gender and exercise stage of change was the focus of this study.An archival data set was used.Participants were 190 college students who completed a demographic questionnaire,the Exercise Stage of Change Questionnaire,the Rokeach Values Survey,and the Self-Efficacy for Exercise questionnaire before and after completing a lifetime fitness course.Two 2-factor analyses of covariance were conducted for each dependent varible,self-efficacy and health-value.Gender and exercise stage of change were the independent variables.Exercise stage of change was divided into four subcategories:contemplation,preparation,action nand maintenance.A pretest on each dependent variable served as the covariate.Results of the analysis indicated that health valuse scores were significantly different as a function of exercise stage of change.A significant main effect was found between health value and exercise stage of change.A sigificant main effect was found between health value and exercise stage of change.A Bryant Paulson procedure was performed to determine which of the four stages of change for exercise differed on health value scores.The analysis revealed that participants in the contemplation and preparation exercise stages of change ranked health value significantly lower than participants in the action and maintenance exercise stages of change.Implications for theory and pratice and recommendations for future research are discussed.