• Post-Arrival Performance Interventions That Assist Expatriates’ Adjustment and Performance

      Wood, Evan D.
      This research examined the relationship between post-arrival performance interventions and the adjustment and performance of North American expatriates working and living in Hong Kong. The focus was on an integrated view of multiple post-arrival performance interventions in order to examine their combined impact. This research provides information to organizations regarding strategies to improve the adjustment and performance of expatriates. A multivariate design was used to describe the dynamics underlying the dimensions of adjustment and performance by indicating which interventions in combination might be more strongly associated with adjustment and performance. A questionnaire comprised of several existing constructs derived from the extant literature was developed and administered to those listed in the 2009/2010 American Chamber of Commerce Hong Kong membership directory. The interventions examined were integrated cross-cultural training, mentoring, role ambiguity, spouse and family support, and compensation. Four different multiple regression models were developed. The final general adjustment regression model showed a relationship with spouse and family support and role ambiguity. The final interaction adjustment regression model showed a relationship with role ambiguity, spouse and family support, compensation, and the control variable language fluency. The final work adjustment regression model showed a relationship with integrated cross-cultural training, mentoring, role ambiguity, spouse and family support, and compensation. Lastly, the final performance regression model showed a relationship with integrated cross-cultural training, mentoring, role ambiguity, spouse and family support, compensation, and language fluency. The results suggest the importance of multi-national corporations to consider post-arrival performance interventions in addition to pre-departure interventions. Specifically, two primary areas emerged with high significance. First, reducing role ambiguity has a significant relationship with all three adjustment constructs and performance. Second, the findings lend support to the concept of organizations providing additional support to the spouse and family as a means of increasing adjustment and performance of expatriates.