• Barriers to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Intervention Implementation in the Public School Setting

      2010-09-23
      The present study examined the impact of potential barriers on commonly recommended school-based interventions for children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The interventions included were the Daily Behavioral Report Card, token reinforcement, response cost, instructional style changes, and classroom environment changes. The potential barriers studied were the time teachers spent on an intervention, the level of parent support, the level of child difficulty, the acceptability of an intervention, the perceived fairness of an intervention, and the level of administrative support. The study also examined the potential relationship between teachers‟ stress levels and the number of barriers they perceive to these interventions. Previous research has looked at the barriers to intervention implementation in the home setting, but there has been a gap in the research that addresses problems that may hinder teachers in implementing commonly recommended interventions. The present study examined responses from 62 teachers that were recruited from one Midwestern state and one Southern state. Data was collected through an online survey that was sent out to teachers‟ public domain email and was analyzed using Repeated Measure ANOVAs and Pearson Correlations. There were significant differences across interventions on each potential barrier. Teacher stress was also positively correlated with the number of barriers they perceived. Additionally, the level of teacher stress positively correlated with the barriers of time, level of child difficulty, perceived fairness of an intervention, and the level of administrative support.
    • Barriers to Implementation of RTI at the Secondary Level

      Holsapple, Nancy Jane
      The purpose of the study was to determine if there are differences among building administrators, guidance counselors, and special education directors on a perceived level of implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI) at the secondary level. The study also examined whether or not RTI serves as a predictor of students identified in special education. This study did not find a significant difference between perceptions of Indiana high school counselors, Indiana high school administrators and Indiana special education directors. The study also revealed the six indicators of RTI do not serve as predictors for students who are identified in special education. Of the three groups surveyed, one indicator was consistently identified as being fully knowledgeable in this model; the RTI administers curriculum-based measurements for progress monitoring easily and efficiently.
    • Barriers to Implementation of RTI at the Secondary Level

      Holsapple, Nancy Jane
      The purpose of the study was to determine if there are differences among building administrators, guidance counselors, and special education directors on a perceived level of implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI) at the secondary level. The study also examined whether or not RTI serves as a predictor of students identified in special education. This study did not find a significant difference between perceptions of Indiana high school counselors, Indiana high school administrators and Indiana special education directors. The study also revealed the six indicators of RTI do not serve as predictors for students who are identified in special education. Of the three groups surveyed, one indicator was consistently identified as being fully knowledgeable in this model; the RTI administers curriculum-based measurements for progress monitoring easily and efficiently.
    • Bat Species Diversity at an Urban-Rural Interface: Dominance by One Species in an Urban Area

      Damm, Jason Philip (2012-01-13)
      The growth of urban areas is known to affect different species of wildlife in varying ways. Many organisms have exhibited declines in abundance due to habitat loss, while overall species diversity decreases. Bats can serve as reliable indicators of habitat quality and level of anthropogenic disturbance. To investigate urbanization impacts on a Midwestern bat community, I analyzed nine years of mist-net captures from a study area on the edge of Indianapolis, Indiana, where the percentage of urbanized ground cover ranged from zero to 26%, within 1.3-km of a net site. I used Pearson correlation statistics to examine the effect of urban ground cover on each species’ abundance, and the Shannon-Wiener Diversity Index was used to quantify species diversity at the study area. To test the effect of urbanization on diversity, linear mixed models were constructed using percentage of urban ground cover and year. A total of 10 species were captured over nine years, seven of them annually. The big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) was the dominant species at all urbanized sites and at five of six rural sites. Most species were more common at rural sites than at urbanized sites. Urbanization was significantly and negatively related to bat species diversity, although one species, the northern myotis (Myotis septentrionalis), showed a significant positive correlation with urban ground cover. Two bat species, the eastern pipistrelle (Perimyotis subflavus) and the little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) both displayed significant negative correlations with the percentage of urban ground cover. The Indiana myotis (Myotis sodalis) had a marginal negative correlation, but not significant.
    • The Battle

      Gorcoff, Jason (2012-04-26)
      I grew up on popular culture: films, video games and comic books. The illustrations for movie posters and game cartridges were often very realistic as were the special effects in the various horror and science fiction films. I was inspired by their realism and dramatic subject matter. This is the visual language from my youth and also the language that I emulate in my work. The themes of my paintings are often personal and the ideas are not all that complicated. I tend to be drawn towards stories of good and evil or human conflict in general. With these images I hope to be able to express a simple dynamic of struggle and longing that exists in life. And above all else I try to create an image of physical beauty for the viewer .
    • Beach Buddies Community Engagement Design

      Fergie, Jennifer (2012-12)
      Ever since I could remember my summers began and ended at the beach. From the time I was a small child until now it has always been my place of solace. It is a place where I can let my thoughts, emotions, and creativity run free.
    • Beautiful Misery

      Boyer, Natalie (2008-04-01)
      Within moments of suffering, beauty emerges and manifests itself into forms that we do not fully recognize. We become willful, dependant, and most of all the accepting of our human frailty. I choose to present portraits that represent this idea of suffering as being human and unique. I do not seek to overwhelm my viewer with sadness and despair, but rather to open my viewer's eyes to what suffering may reveal. As a society, we are generally numb to the tragedy that may befall others. Some apply an invisible shield and a mask of glamour to conceal what they believe may resemble suffering and defeat. Our natural inclination is to present to each other an image of our own perfection, as stable and immortal beings. In reality, we analyze ourselves and recognize natures defeat every day when we look in the mirror, Great measure is taken to conceal any sign of aging, stress personal ailments, and the inevitable death. My models represent this struggle with life, yet without any concealment. Their troubles are laid before the viewers, as human as they may be.
    • Before It Rains

      Parkman, Veronica O. (2010-07-20)
      "For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son that whosoever believeth in him should not parish but have everlasting life." Contemporary Christian literature is becoming first choice in public libraries and bookstores throughout the country. From novels about end-time prophesy to autobiographies of world-renowned pastors, works written for and about Christians have reached an all-time high. Before it Rains is indeed, according to the scriptural definition of salvation found in the King James Version of the bible, a contemporary Christian novel; the characters must go through the biblical process of accepting Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior before receiving a newness or fulfillment of life. Moreover, this novel presents a particular focus on the African American community. Not only does the audience receive a glimpse of life from an African American perspective, but the reader also experiences a unique style of worship and the importance of religion in the black church. The reader is introduced to three religious characters, and the chapters in which these characters are introduced present strong images of the African American church such as handclapping and tambourines. Although Before it Rains is a contemporary Christian novel, it can also be considered a romantic work. Elements of romantic writing that can be found frequently throughout the book include emphasis placed on emotions, emphasis upon freedom and individuality, and emphasis on imagination and fantasy. Quite often, prophetic dreams occur, and the reader is presented with flashbacks of the characters' pasts. Before it Rains does not appeal to any specific audience; just as salvation, according to Romans 10:9, is open to all who believe, this novel serves as a nontraditional gateway for those who are curious about accepting Christ into their lives. Readers are presented with realistic characters who, like themselves, may be somewhat skeptical when it comes to spiritual concerns.
    • Behaviors and Perceptions Concerning Online Nutrition Information Among Young Adult Midwest University Students

      Moeckly, Brenda (2013-02-18)
      Since the inception of the Internet, Americans have become increasingly dependent upon this medium for gleaning information, with each new generation being more apt to seek information online. This general trend has affected, among many other things, the search for health and nutrition information. While the Internet can provide a wealth of beneficial information for users, it can pose a myriad of dangers, as well, if users do not know how to look for credible information. The objectives of this study were to determine where university students search for nutrition information and what criteria they use when seeking nutrition information online. The population sampled was from a Midwest University. Participants were selected via convenience sampling methods. Students were invited to participate in an online survey available campuswide. Data was analyzed using SPSS statistical software. This study found that 73% of students surveyed indicated they use the Internet to search for nutrition information online. Government websites and product websites were shown to be chosen most often as being visited for nutrition information. The credibility criteria most often chosen as being important included date of publication or update of information, the information’s being authored by a medical doctor, and the web address ending in “.gov.” The results of this study identified that the majority of university students sampled used the Internet when searching for nutrition information and identified several criteria that students use when determining online nutrition information’s credibility. These results can be used to help health professionals, and registered dietitians in particular, know how best to provide and promote online health and nutrition information for consumers. Young adults are leading the trend of searching for health and nutrition information online, and registered dietitians need to provide timely, and understandable information for the public in order to best meet their needs.
    • Bias in a Just World? Sexual Prejudice, Gender Self-Esteem, and Intimate Partner Violence

      Mahoy, Crystal D. (2014-03-18)
      Each year, approximately 835,000 men and 1.3 million women are victims of intimate partner violence (IPV; American Bar Association, n.d). Although the prevalence of same-sex intimate partner violence (IPV) is approximately the same as IPV in heterosexual couples (Alexander, 2002), fewer studies have examined perceptions of IPV in same-sex couples or of IPV perpetrated against heterosexual men compared to heterosexual women. In the current study, Just World Theory (Lerner & Miller, 1978) is used as a framework for understanding factors associated with perceptions of heterosexual and same-sex IPV, including sexual prejudice and gender self-esteem. Perceptions of IPV were examined in a sample of 251 male and female undergraduate students from Indiana State University. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four vignette conditions in which the gender of the perpetrator and victim were manipulated, resulting in two heterosexual and two same-sex conditions. Participants then completed several self-report measures, including the Collective Self-Esteem Scale (assesses self-esteem related to gender) and the Modern Homonegativity Scale (assesses sexual prejudice). Participants also completed a measure of social desirability and a measure assessing attributions of blame in the IPV scenario. Results indicated that men and women did not differ significantly in their blame of perpetrators and victims as a function of target character gender or sexual orientation. Additionally, gender self-esteem was not related to blame of victims and sexual prejudice was related to victim responsibility for women but not for men. Sexual prejudice and gender self-esteem were not significantly correlated for men or women. Results emphasize the importance of professionals’awareness of their biases and potential sexual prejudice when working with victims and perpetrators of IPV, particularly gay men and lesbians. Results also highlight the difficulty that heterosexual and gay men and lesbians likely have in obtaining support following IPV victimization. Although results do not appear to provide support for the Just World Theory construct of position identification, it is possible that other factors such as sexual prejudice outweighed the need for women to protect their potential position as a victim.
    • Border Pedagogy and the Acculturation of Korean Students in U.S. Institutions of High Education

      Green, Randy (2010-09-22)
      This study aimed at identifying learning and teaching strategies that can promote the process of acculturation for Korean students in institutions of higher education in the United States. In particular, the study attempted to pinpoint ways in which these students and their instructors can become aware of and resist educational tendencies and approaches that promote hegemony and devalue cultural perspectives and experiences as well as construct meaning within the context of a worldview that is influenced by both Korean and U.S. cultures. It was hoped that the identification of these skills and strategies would aid both students and instructors in developing the ability to become successful border crossers, as defined by Giroux‟s (2005) border pedagogy, as well as culturally enlightened citizens of the global community. The study was qualitative in nature and consisted of a series of interviews with six South Korean students (three undergraduate and three graduate) enrolled in a mid-sized institution of higher education in the U.S. Midwest, six U.S. faculty members at the same university who had had Korean students in their courses, and four faculty members from Korea who were teaching at the university. A review of the literature included an examination of Positivism and its role in U.S. education, border pedagogy, particularly as it relates to international education and the process of acculturation, processes of cross-cultural adaptation, studies that have been conducted about South Korean students at U.S. institutions of higher education, historical influences on Korean higher education, and teaching and learning strategies common in South Korean universities. The study was able to identify several teaching and learning strategies that were interpreted as encouraging the process of acculturation and enabling students to cross borders. These strategies appeared to be supportive of the empowerment of and dialogue between students and teachers and strove to incorporate the cultural perspectives of both parties into the teaching and learning process. The study also identified a number of practices and perceptions that appeared to promote the assimilation of these students. In particular, there was little evidence that suggested the participants had reflected on or resisted influences and educational tendencies which could possibly promote the process of hegemony. The development of strategies that combat this tendency and facilitate a demystification of the educational process is recommended.
    • Branding the International Street Food Association-Street Foods in Taipei/New York City

      Gu, Yi-Jiun (2012-08)
      Growing from the soil and soaking up the sunshine, food is the essence of nature. An ancient poem in my hometown points out that harvesting grain needs intense labor, so the best way for people to express their appreciation to workers is not to waste any food. Similarly, in the West, Jean-Francais Millet captured the female peasants bathed in golden light in his painting, The Gleaners, because he tried to praise peasants' plight and dignity
    • Breeding Migrations, Survivorship, and Obligate Crayfish Burrow Use by Adult Crawfish Frogs (Lithobates Areolatus)

      Heemeyer, Jennifer L (2011-07-19)
      Movements are risky behaviors to animals, and amphibians are no exception. Being unable to cover long distances quickly, amphibians may find migrations challenging, yet many if not most species exhibit cyclic annual migrations. Crawfish Frogs (Lithobates areolatus), are a relatively understudied species of North American amphibian listed as endangered in Indiana and Iowa, and considered a species of conservation concern throughout much of their range. To better understand the biology of this species, and in particular, to assess the role that movements play in affecting survivorship, I radio tracked 48 Crawfish Frog adults, in 2009 and 2010. My study encompassed a total of 7,898 telemetered-frog days; single frogs were tracked for up to 606 days. These data demonstrate two behaviors previously undocumented in this species: 1) migration distances that averaged nearly ½ km, and for one frog was > 1,187 m; and 2) fidelity to upland burrows excavated by crayfish. Together, these findings indicate that Crawfish Frogs have a remarkable ability to home to distant upland burrow sites. Burrow fidelity in Crawfish Frogs involves, in part, frogs following similar migration routes to and from breeding wetlands. Burrow fidelity also occurs after ranging movements, and often involves individual frogs following the same circuit across years. Further, I demonstrate that movements are risky for Crawfish Frogs (about 12 times riskier than burrow dwelling), and therefore have survival consequences. My data also suggest that adult Crawfish Frogs are likely not dispersing to colonize new sites; instead, it seems more likely that juveniles represent the dispersing stage. To ensure the least impact to Crawfish Frog populations several conservation measures should be taken. First, core habitat and buffers should be established that exclude or limit roads for at least a 1.1-km radius around breeding wetlands. Secondly, burrow destruction should be minimized by limiting new cultivation and other ground disturbance within the core habitat and buffer. Thirdly, prescribed burns should be avoided from mid-March to mid-May, when frogs are out of their burrows migrating to and from wetlands.
    • Budgeting the finances of small high school libraries

      La Follette, Mary Edna (2013-04-09)
      Not available.
    • Bullying,cyberbullying,<br />incivility,and sexual <br />harrasmnet:A spectrum <br />of interpersonal mistreatment.

      Love, Christine D (2012-05-18)
      With the growing occurrence of deadly shootings on college campuses (Jenson, 2007), campus administrators have placed emphasis on early detection of potentially dangerous students. One indicator of possible violence is perpetration of uncivil or aggressive behaviors (Clark, 2008a; Kolanko et al., 2006). Placing behaviors on a spectrum of interpersonal mistreatment can provide cues to behaviors that could escalate into greater violence. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether bullying, cyberbullying, incivility, and sexual harassment directed at faculty members occurs on such a spectrum and as separate or overlapping constructs. Factor analyses were conducted on frequency of occurrence and level of upset data collected for 49 behaviors included on the Faculty Experience Survey. Both analyses resulted in three-factor solutions that demonstrated a great deal of overlap of the following categories: (a) Poor Student Behaviors, (b) Direct Incivility, and (c) Aggressive, Threatening Behaviors. These categories appear to create a spectrum of interpersonal mistreatment ranging from the most common and least upsetting to the least common and most upsetting behaviors. This study also sought to determine who was most likely to be the target of interpersonal mistreatment based on personal, academic, and institutional characteristics. Age and sexual orientation affected the report of Direct Incivility behaviors, while characteristics indicating longevity in academia increased the likelihood of having experienced Aggressive, Threatening Behaviors. Differences were seen in the frequency of Poor Student and Aggressive, Threatening Behaviors in certain regions of the country. Strategies for preventing and responding to interpersonal mistreatment are discussed.
    • CAD associate degree programs in public post-secondary eduaction.

      Duan, Xin-Ran
      This study investigated what community colleges were teaching in CAD associate degree programs in manufacturing and construction fields, and what knowledge and skills were required to empower CAD students to become successful in the workplace. In order to better meet business and industry needs, a model curriculum for CAD associate degree programs was developed and presented. This model curriculum could more effectively prepare students with the required knowledge and skills for successful employment.A three-round Delphi technique was used to collect data from CAD professors at community colleges and experts in industry. A total of 32 members in the Panel of Institution Experts, and a total of 30 members in the Panel of Industry Experts were selected from 29 states in four regions of the United States using a stratified random sampling method. The analysis of demographic data revealed geographic representation, professional background, and rich experience for the members of the two panels. The study found that AutoCAD was dominant in industry for CAD applications, and AutoCAD was the primary software used for CAD programs at community colleges.Also, the study found that all the surveyed colleges were accredited by six major regional accreditation agencies, and all the colleges were satisfied with program outcomes.In addition, alist of forty-seven items of required knowledge and skills were identified by the two panels, which should be included in the model curriculum as key elements.As a result of the study, a model curriculum, containing a core curriculum with 24 courses in four categories plus suggested general eduaction courses, was validated by the two panels. Thsi ideal curriculum for CAD associate degree programs provided a commbination of solid theoretical foundation, classroom studies, and laboratory practice. To make it deliverable at community colleges, adjustment may be necessary to accommodate general education courses and the core curriculum courses for an individual college.
    • Campus Environment Influence on Women’s Leadership Development at Small Private Institutions

      Weina, Kasie
      The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of women’s leadership and the important influential factors that impact women’s leadership development. Campus environmental factors and gender socialization were examined in an effort to understand women’s leadership identity and development and the potential influences on that development. Data were collected in a semi-structured interview with seven students from two different institutions. Both institutions were private and located in a Midwestern city. One institution had an entire on-campus population of women and the other institution had an on-campus population of 21% women. This study supported the existence of a connection between women’s leadership development, the campus environment, and gender socialization. Perceptions of their leadership were influenced by external factors such as role models, adult and peer affirmation, and the perceptions of others and internal factors such as confidence and initiative. The themes that emerged regarding the campus environmental differences were (a) self-perceptions through language, (b) demonstration of worth, (c) gender versus environment, and (d) expectations for behavior. Overall, the all-women’s institutional environment was perceived as more flexible and less dependent on gender socialization than the male-dominated institutional environment, which supports that the campus environment is an influential factor in how women perceive leadership.
    • Capacities facilitating school change involving project-based learning at the middle school level

      Browder, Lee Shane
      With schools continuing to fall short of No Child Left Behind standards and with future challenges just around the corner, educators must identify and make positive changes in schools. Researchers must work to recognize and exhibit how student achievement is fostered and inform educators of options on how to move in a positive direction according to research. The purpose of this qualitative, multiple-site case study was to examine what capacity-building factors were in middle schools identified as successfully implementing project-based learning. This study focused on the capacities that are consistently implemented leading to successful school change with the Schools to Watch®. The Schools to Watch® sample of three schools was purposefully selected with respect to this designation itself, as membership in that group served as a quality-assurance mechanism that participating schools strove to be high-performing, challenging to all students, infused with rigorous curriculum, imbued with rich instruction, and staffed with teachers who were trained at the highest levels with outstanding supports. These schools had completed rigorous training and development to achieve the status of being a School to Watch® member for the 2012-2013 school year. The sample schools had all addressed the issues of change as they implemented project-based learning during the past few years, since this is a focus of the Schools to Watch® program. The enrollments of these schools ranged from 255 to 915 and included Grades 5 through 8. This study focused on the capacity-building initiatives that occur within the building as a component when implementing school change. In doing so, it strived to answer the question, “What components of capacity building are essential when implementing selected school change?” Sub-questions included the following: 1.What capacities are needed to implement project-based learning at the middle school level? 2.What leadership characteristics are valuable to building capacities in implementing project-based learning at the middle school level? 3.What are the keys to sustaining successful change after implementation of project-based learning at the middle school level? This study focused on the use of interviews, observations, and document analysis to examine school capacity at the middle school level. This process created consistent results that indicated that these schools consistently focused on the personal sphere through a “we-centeredness,” through an interpersonal sphere with respect to coaching, and through the organizational sphere with respect to data, which worked together in the context of high-level school functioning.In the three conclusions, the focus was on creating better relationships that could enhance and expand upon a we-centered approach, using talent scouting and teambuilding to further the notion of leader-as-coach in school operation, and reconceptualizing the structures and operations of schools to maximize the opportunity to use data to increase the professional capacities within a school.
    • Career Decisions: Goodness-Of-Fit and Attrition of Teachers in Alternative Schools

      Coulter, Deidre S. (2010-09-21)
      Teachers are the most important element in the education system (Stronge, 2002). However, studies of teachers in certain sectors are lacking. The paucity of research on teachers who work in the alternative school environment was a driving force behind this study, which is a case study of the characteristics of alternative schools, perceptions of teacher training, attrition, and goodness-of-fit. Interviews with teachers, administrators, and support staff in an alternative school were used to investigate interactions between teachers and students and between colleagues. Classroom observations of the teachers were used to help explore the classroom climate. Emergent themes such as communication, administrative support, and a holistic view of the student population are explored using the filter of symbolic interaction theory in order to describe the characteristics of effective alternative school teachers, administrators, and staff. Symbolic interaction theory uses the internal shorthand that individuals develop to identify how their actions reflect their thoughts and feelings about the setting in which they find themselves. Implications for future research on the teacher-environment fit in alternative schools are discussed.