• Daddy, can we play Beatles rock band? The lived experiences of a married student with children in a cohort-based education doctoral program

      Thomas, Tony J.
      The purpose of this research is to understand more clearly the lived experiences of married doctoral students with children who are enrolled in a cohort - based program. Attempting to maintain a strong family relationship, balance a career, enr oll in a doctoral program, and provide for a family is an avalanche of emotion and pressure on all members of the family. All facets of family relationships that have been strained need to be relieved of stressors and more focus needs to be on the family during each semester. With the time commitment caused by classes, studying, and through the dissertation process, family relationships can be torn apart by the lack of attention to the family. The ability of a doctoral student to survive the outside stra ins of life is increasingly difficult (Gardner, 2009; Madrey, 1983) . This qualitative, phenomenological study examined the lived experiences of married studen ts with children under 18 years old, in a cohort - based doctoral program at a Midwestern research university. Data were collected from a purposeful sample of 10 participants who had bee n students in a doctoral cohort - based program between 1998 and 2009. The chosen participants were enrolled in th e cohort based doctoral program but did not need to hav e graduated. An analysis of the data elicited five themes: support — “can I do this alone?” the effect of a doctoral program on the marital relationship, walkin’ the tightrope: balancing it all, filling the gender gap, and advice for present and future doc toral students who are married with children . This study recognized challenges and opportunities to better understand married doctoral students with children. It also recognized that with communication, cooperation, and compassion, the married doctoral student with children can have a successful academic a career and maintain a strong family relationship. The findings of this study aim to serve as a guide not only for married doctoral students with children but also for spouses, families, mentor s, program faculty, dissertation chairs, friends, and coworkers. The experiences of married doctoral students with children are not only unique, they are also inspirational. It is vital more research on this topic should occur and subsequent finding s are discovered to allow similar students to persist toward their educational endeavors and allow for their family relationships to remain strong and thrive.
    • Dendroclimatic Reconstruction from Bald Cypress in Southwestern Indiana

      Van De Veer, Robin Lyn (2011-09-20)
      In the United States, bald cypress (Taxodium distichum) is generally recognized as an important component of the forested wetlands found in the Southwestern Coastal Plain and the Mississippi River Valley (which extends to the southern Midwest). The lifespan of this deciduous species is important not only commercially, but also in an ecological capacity. This study focuses mainly upon the role the tree plays in its environment and how it can be used as an indicator of climate through drought/flood signals in the rings. Bald cypress is a long-lived tree that can be over 1000 years old and is sensitive to climate and ground water hydrology. Because of these factors it is a favorable choice for dendrochronological study in the region. According to the International Tree-Ring Database, a chronology of the species is not well defined for southwestern Indiana. This research provides this missing information and creates the northern most bald cypress chronology in the Midwest. The study site is located in the extreme southwest of Indiana around Hovey Lake (a backwater lake of the Ohio River) about 10 miles south of Mount Vernon, Indiana. Samples were taken from trees near the shore, both on land and in the water.This study dated some trees to 1855. Analysis of the tree rings, climate data, and river discharge data revealed that bald cypress are not declining in southwestern Indiana. The rate of tree ring growth increases as PDSI does and the rate of river discharge does not seem to affect growth much at all. Even though this is the northernmost bald cypress chronology in the midwest and therefore should be stressed according to the theory of ecological amplitude, this chronology does not fall in the category with the highest series intercorrelation or mean sensitivity. The construction of the dam in 1975 has overwhelmed the climate signal in these trees and the trees continue to be suppressed due to the current water level.
    • Desirable personality traits of teachers

      Reed, Loren T. (2012-08-16)
      Not Available.
    • DEVELOPMENT OF A QUALITY MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT TOOL TO EVALUATE SOFTWARE USING SOFTWARE QUALITY MANAGEMENT BEST PRACTICES

      Erukulapati, Kishore (Cunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State University, 2017-12)
      Organizations are constantly in search of competitive advantages in today’s complex global marketplace through improvement of quality, better affordability, and quicker delivery of products and services. This is significantly true for software as a product and service. With other things being equal, the quality of software will impact consumers, organizations, and nations. The quality and efficiency of the process utilized to create and deploy software can result in cost and schedule overruns, cancelled projects, loss of revenue, loss of market share, and loss of consumer confidence. Hence, it behooves us to constantly explore quality management strategies to deliver high quality software quickly at an affordable price. This research identifies software quality management best practices derived from scholarly literature using bibliometric techniques in conjunction with literature review, synthesizes these best practices into an assessment tool for industrial practitioners, refines the assessment tool based on academic expert review, further refines the assessment tool based on a pilot test with industry experts, and undertakes industry expert validation. Key elements of this software quality assessment tool include issues dealing with people, organizational environment, process, and technology best practices. Additionally, weights were assigned to issues of people, organizational environment, process, and technology best practices based on their relative importance, to calculate an overall weighted score for organizations to evaluate where they stand with respect to their peers in pursuing the business of producing quality software. This research study indicates that people best practices carry 40% of overall weight, organizational best v practices carry 30% of overall weight, process best practices carry 15% of overall weight, and technology best practices carry 15% of overall weight. The assessment tool that is developed will be valuable to organizations that seek to take advantage of rapid innovations in pursuing higher software quality. These organizations can use the assessment tool for implementing best practices based on the latest cutting edge management strategies that can lead to improved software quality and other competitive advantages in the global marketplace. This research contributed to the current academic literature in software quality by presenting a quality assessment tool based on software quality management best practices, contributed to the body of knowledge on software quality management, and expanded the knowledgebase on quality management practices. This research also contributed to current professional practice by incorporating software quality management best practices into a quality management assessment tool to evaluate software.
    • Development of an Instrument to Measure Faculty Adherence to the Norms Of Science

      Motycka, Eric D.
      The norms of science of Communalism, Universalism, Disinterestedness, and Organized Skepticism provide a framework for understanding and examining faculty activity related to the triple helix of university, industry, and government relations. Despite the increase in scholarship regarding faculty and the norms of science, there is a lack of research focused on measuring faculty adherence to the norms that is psychometrically valid and reliable. The goal of this dissertation was to contribute to the literature by developing and testing such an instrument. This instrument differentiates among the norms of Organized Skepticism, Universalism, Commercialism, and Scientific Puritanism, the latter two being refined labels that captured the questions involved with those scales. The instrument‘s psychometric properties demonstrated both construct validity and internal reliability via field testing with 290 faculty at United States Midwestern research universities.
    • Diagnosing borderline personality disorder:the effect of therapist's negative emotional reactions on diagnostic judgements.

      Mayo, Keith (2012-05-09)
      Previous studies suggest that clinicians are prone to bias in diagnosing Borderline Personality Disorder(BPD)and that BPD symptoms elicit negative emotional reactions(NER)from clinicians.However,no studies have specifically examined the effect of NER on the diagnosis of BPD.This study examined the decision-making processes used when assigning a diagnosis of BPD,specifically,whether clinicians NER towards patients exhibiting BPD symptoms bias decision-making and result in misuse of the BPD diagnosis.A randomly-selected national sample of 98 licensed psychologists completed an Internet survey in which they read two case vignettes that were designed to elicit NER but were below threshold for a diagnosis of BPD.Participants rated the representatives of a series of Axis I and II diagnosis and rated their level of confidence;rated severity,prognosis,and the likelihood of the individual in the case benefiting from treatment;and rated the applicability of a series of symptoms for the case(including each of the DSM-IV criteria for BPD).They then rated the degree of NER felt toward the patient using two subscales of the Impact Message Inventory(IMI).Results provided moderate support for the prediction that participants who report higher levels of NER wold be more likely to diagnose BPD,would assign higher BPD representativeness ratings, and would rate the prognosis and likelihood of response to treatment lower.Predictions concerning the moderating effects of clinician variables(years of clinical experience,percentage of time spent in direct patient contact) were not supported,but clinician gender had significant effects on the diagnosis of BPD.The hypothesis that clinicians who were asked to assign diagnosis before rating symptoms(i.e a stimulated prototype approach)would be more prone to over-diagnosis of BPD was also not supported,but order of the cases had unexpected effects on the results.Implications for clinical training and directions for future research are discussed.
    • Diagnosis of Depersonalization Disorder

      DeHoff, Margaret R. (2010-09-22)
      Depersonalization Disorder (DPD) is considered both under-researched and underdiagnosed. A variety of reasons have been proposed for the under-diagnosis of DPD, including the high frequency of depersonalization as a symptom and comorbidity of DPD with other disorders. Under-diagnosis of DPD has also been attributed to inadequate diagnostic criteria in the DSM-IV-TR, as it lists only four criteria and only one specifically addresses the phenomenon of depersonalization. Several groups of researchers have proposed more comprehensive and in-depth conceptualizations of DPD. Further, common biases in clinical decision-making, such as an over-reliance on cognitive heuristics and the use of prototypes, can contribute to inaccurate diagnosis and under-diagnosis. A national sample of licensed psychologists was randomly selected and recruited from the membership of the American Psychological Association. The study was conducted on-line and participants were asked to read one of two DPD cases, assign a diagnosis, and rate the representativeness of a series of diagnoses for the case. They were also asked to rate the presence of a list of symptoms, including the DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10 criteria for DPD, and the symptoms and dimensions of DPD and depersonalization from the literature. Half of the participants were asked to assign a diagnosis and then rate symptoms (simulated prototype approach) while the others rated the symptoms before assigning a diagnosis (simulated DSM-IV approach). The study found that clinicians under-diagnosed DPD and that the DSM-IV depersonalization criterion had high sensitivity but not adequate specificity. Results indicated that a simulated DSM-IV approach improved accuracy of diagnosing DPD. Finally, results indicated that the symptoms of DPD and depersonalization proposed by researchers had better predictive value for DPD representativeness ratings than the current DSM-IV criteria, but not for a diagnosis of DPD. The results of this study have implications for the diagnostic criteria for DPD, clinical decisionmaking strategies, clinical training, and future research on DPD.
    • Direct Mail Marketing: SAMSUNG myPhone

      Baek, Sangjun (2012-04-26)
      In advertising, many industries currently have the same borrowed look that is often used over and over, creating a sea of"me too" advertising. As a designer, I am expected to explore many different approaches for one product. I have to create a new campaign for an existing product by developing posters, magazine/newspaper ads, direct mail and follow-up mailings. For my thesis, the campaign will be developed for a new Samsung cell phone, which I have named "myPhone." Part of the campaign is the positioning of the product and its name change, stressing that the phone is developed for the consumer. For my thesis project, I have created a direct marketing campaign.
    • Disaster preparedness in the american academy:A study of institutional context factors for compliance with the national incident management system.

      Wilder, Paul Joseph (2012-05-21)
      Recent major disaster events at colleges and universities around the nation have demonstrated that change is needed in the way that higher education institutions (HEIs) approach disaster preparation. The comforting notion that HEIs are immune to natural and manmade hazards has been shattered by events such as the Virginia Tech massacre and Hurricane Katrina’s assault on Mississippi’s coastal campuses. Reports of many other institutional responses to a variety of disaster incidents demonstrate that these two major disasters are not isolated events on the campuses of the American academy. This study developed a snapshot view of disaster preparation in American HEIs, using National Incident Management System (NIMS) compliance as a proxy for disaster preparedness. This quantitative, retrospective study, with a non-experimental design, used a scientific approach that employed both archival and survey data from a stratified random sample of 108 HEIs that were categorized based on organization and governance, as well as institutional sector, to establish a benchmark measurement of disaster preparation in the various types of institutions. Further, the study examined institutional context factors to investigate the degree of NIMS compliance in place at American HEIs, including organization and governance, previous disaster experience, institutional size, legal representation on the planning and response team, institutional sector, and composite economic losses by state, to see if any of these factors was statistically associated with NIMS compliance. Results indicate that two of the study variables were statistically significant; institutional size and institutional sector. These findings expose that smaller institutions are lagging behind in disaster preparedness. Additionally, the outcomes reveal that private institutions are facing difficulty keeping pace with their public counterparts in disaster preparation.
    • Disclosure Involving a Third-Party: Reciprocity and Liking Outcomes

      Cotterell, Keith (2011-09-19)
      This investigation examines the function of third-party disclosures on reciprocal self-disclosures and liking. Sixty-eight college students engaged in a social interaction with one or two computers. In the experiment, one computer would “disclose” information either about itself or about another computer (third-party). Each disclosure was followed by a question to the participant. Questions were asked either by the discloser or by third-party to assess reciprocation of disclosures. Afterwards, participants rated liking for the two computers-as-social-actors. Participants showed a tendency to disclose more (i.e., give longer responses) to an actor who disclosed to them, regardless of whether the disclosure was about the self- or about a third-party (though intimacy of the disclosures was not different). Participants did not disclose more to the third-party whom they heard disclosures about. Liking was unaffected by the disclosures. These results suggest that positive social benefits may be gained by disclosing about another in the place of oneself. Having another individual disclose about oneself, did not elicit of the same social benefits. Implications are discussed about the nature of disclosures and relationship formation.
    • Disorders of Extreme Stress, Not Otherwise Specified, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Borderline Personality Disorder: A Vignette Study Exploring Clinicians' Diagnostic Perceptions

      Knowles, Awen (2010-05-11)
      Research suggests that some individuals who suffer invasive, early childhood trauma develop significant character pathology, and may meet the criteria for both Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Trauma researchers have proposed a new diagnostic category for these individuals, called Disorders of Extreme Stress, Not Otherwise Specified (DESNOS), also known as Complex PTSD. The present study compared clinicians’ symptom ratings for two case vignettes to determine if DESNOS was a better description of the cases than PTSD, BPD, or comorbid PTSD/BPD. Additionally, potential sex bias in diagnosis was examined by manipulating the sex of the client in the vignette, and examining effects of participant sex. A national sample of 123 licensed psychologists completed the study online. The participants read both vignettes, rated the symptoms in each case, and assigned a diagnosis. The hypothesis that DESNOS would receive higher mean symptom ratings than PTSD, BPD, or comorbid PTSD/BPD was not supported. PTSD and BPD each received higher mean symptom ratings than DESNOS in Vignette A, but in Vignette B there were no significant differences in the symptom ratings. The hypothesis that sex of the client in the vignette would influence the diagnosis of BPD was not supported in Vignette A, but was supported in Vignette B, in which all BPD diagnoses were assigned to the female case. The hypothesis that female participants would endorse higher PTSD diagnostic ratings than would male participants was not supported. However, female participants assigned higher PTSD symptom ratings, and endorsed more of the symptoms of PTSD for Vignette A than did male participants, suggesting that the women attended more to the trauma history in the case. Overall, the study provided limited support for the construct of DESNOS. Limitations of the methodology, implications of the findings, and directions for future research are discussed.
    • DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING IN INTERNET OF THINGS (IoT) USING MOBILE AD HOC NETWORK (MANET): A SWARM INTELLIGENCE BASED APPROACH

      SELVADURAI, JOHN (Cunningham Memorial Library, Terre Haute, Indiana State University., 2017-12)
      Internet of Things (IoT) is a fast-growing technological trend, which is expected to revolutionize the world by changing the way we do things. IoT is a concept that encourages all the electronic devices to connect to the internet and interact with each other. By connecting all these devices to the internet, new markets can be created, productivity can be improved, operating costs can be reduced and many other benefits can be obtained. In IoT architecture, often sensors and aggregators collect data and send to a cloud server for analyzing via the traditional cloud-server model. This client-server architecture is not adequate to fulfill the growing requirements of IoT applications because this model is subjected to cloud latency. This research proposed a distributed computing model called Distributed Shared Optimization (DSO) to eliminate the delay caused by cloud latency. DSO is based on swarm intelligence where algorithms are built by modeling the behaviors of biological agents such as bees, ants, and birds. Mobile Ad-hoc Network (MANET) is used as the platform to build distributed computing. The infrastructure-less and leader-less features of MANET make it the ideal candidate to build IoT with swarm intelligence. To test the theory, this research also built a simulation program and conducted multiple simulations on both DSO and client-server models. The simulation data was analyzed by descriptive statistics and One-Way ANOVA. This research found that there is a significant difference in computing time between DSO and client-server models. Further, Multiple-Regression technique was conducted on DSO simulation data to identify the effect sensors and data had towards DSO computing time.
    • Diurnal and nocturnal avian antipredator behavior in thermally challenging conditions

      Carr, Jennie M. (2014-03-18)
      Diurnal avian antipredator behavior has been the focus of much past research, yet the influence of the thermal environment on such behaviors is often overlooked. Far less is known about nocturnal avian antipredator behavior, including how these behaviors are influenced by challenging thermal environments. The first portion of my research focused on how the thermal environment influences the diurnal antipredator behavior of wintering birds while (i) exposed to high wind speeds, (ii) foraging in sunlit and shaded microhabitats, and (iii) when using thermoregulatory postures to conserve body heat. In addition to increasing convective heat loss, high wind speeds increase the prevalence of background movements in the environment. My research demonstrated that wintering sparrows exposed to a moving stimulus are less likely to flush to cover on windy days than on calm days, suggesting that wind-driven visual noise may interfere with predator detection. Predator detection may also vary when feeding in sunlight and shade, and the thermal benefits of foraging in direct sunlight on cold winter days may also play an important role in dictating microhabitat choice. Regardless of the thermal benefits of foraging in sunlight, wintering sparrows preferred to feed in shaded microhabitats even at ambient temperatures well below thermoneutrality. However, these birds foraged in sunlight more frequently as ambient temperatures fell, suggesting a trade-off between thermoregulation (solar input) and predation risk. Additional evidence of such a thermoregulation-predation trade-off was evident in the use of heat-conserving thermoregulatory postures by wintering sparrows. Fluffing the feathers or standing on one foot will reduce the amount of heat lost to the environment. However, such postures slow take-off time and likely result in an increase in predation risk. As such, these risky postures were only used when feeding at relatively low ambient temperatures and when near protective cover. In general, these results indicate that characteristics of the thermal environment play an important role in dictating diurnal antipredator behavior. To address how the thermal environment influences nocturnal avian antipredator behavior, I examined the predation-related costs of using energy-saving nocturnal hypothermia. Many species of birds reduce their nighttime body temperature, thus reducing metabolic rate and conserving energy. Such drops in body temperature may be quite substantial and likely influence a bird’s ability to respond to a potential threat during the night. To examine the potential costs of hypothermia, I conducted nocturnal flight tests on hypothermic mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). In general, doves that cooled by more than 5 °C flew poorly or were unable to fly, but were able to fly well once re-warmed to near their normal daytime body temperatures. Thus, low body temperatures during energy-saving hypothermia likely result in an increase in the risk of nocturnal predation. Nocturnal antipredator behavior was also examined in ruby-throated hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris). These hummingbirds frequently use nocturnal torpor (i.e., deep hypothermia), with significant reductions in body temperature and corresponding inability to respond behaviorally to external stimuli. Although hummingbirds altered torpor use seasonally and over the course of the observation period, hummingbirds did not consistently reduce their use of torpor following an experimental increase in perceived predation risk. Thus, although hypothermia is behaviorally costly, further studies are needed to clarify the role of predation on nocturnal behavior in birds.
    • Diversity and Inclusion in The Information Technology Industry: Relating Perceptions and Expectations to Demographic Dimensions

      Wikina, Suanu Bliss
      The American society, especially the workplace, is becoming increasingly diverse in terms of race/ethnicity, culture, national origin, sexual orientation, familial status, age, religion, disability, and educational attainment (where there are people from different backgrounds and cultures the potential for suspicion and prejudices occur). This study examines diversity and inclusion in the information technology sector and assesses whether differences in group members perceptions and expectations are influenced by gender, race/ethnicity, position, and educational status. This study adopts a descriptive, quantitative approach utilizing a survey in the form of a questionnaire constructed using the Web-based survey software SurveyMonkey. This researcher designed a 12-item instrument administered to information technology (IT) professionals who are members of a national IT association. Statistical analyses, including descriptive statistics, correlation analysis, and t-tests were used to answer the research questions. It was found that perceptions and expectations of diversity and inclusion initiatives within the IT industry do not differ significantly by race/ethnicity, gender, education, and position. Details of the results, limitations, recommendations for future research, and applications for practice in organizations by human resources development professionals and technology managers are discussed.
    • Does the training of school board members make a difference?

      Halik, James M (2012-05-21)
      The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of public school superintendents and school board presidents in the United States relative to the orientation and ongoing training that is believed to be necessary for newly elected or selected and experienced board members. At the national, state, and local levels, public education is under a great deal of scrutiny. Public education throughout America is undergoing a significant overhaul unlike any time in the past. Boards of school trustees and superintendents are under the microscope with regard to performance and accountability. There is a lack of extensive research regarding the education, orientation, and training of newly elected or selected and experienced school board members and the perception of how that training might change the members’ effectiveness to influence positively the direction of the school corporation of which they serve. In most states, school board members are not required to have orientation or ongoing training with regard to their role and responsibilities prior to being elected or selected to their seat on the board. In conducting this study, the following questions were addressed and analyzed by a comparison of responses submitted by public school superintendents and school board presidents from coast to coast. 1. Are orientation and ongoing training for school board members important? 2. Do orientation and ongoing training for school board members make a difference? Public school superintendents and school board presidents were randomly selected from throughout the United States from small, medium, and large size school districts. The sample size was 250 public school superintendents and 250 school board presidents from five regions of the country identified by the National School Boards Association as the Northeast, Southern, Central, Western, and Pacific regions. A very high percentage (nearly 90%) of the school board presidents and superintendents reported that board members did attend programs, seminars, or workshops during their first year of service. There is a significant difference between what school board presidents believe and what superintendents believe regarding required or mandated training prior to newly elected or selected board members beginning their role as a member of the board. The majority (80%) of the school board presidents and superintendents in the country reported that board members should be required or mandated to attend programs, seminars, or workshops during their first year of service. On average, only 55% of school board presidents and superintendents in the country believe in-service programs, training seminars, and workshops should be required or mandated for experienced board members after their first year of service on the board.
    • Domain specific identity commitment and alcohol use and problems.

      Glanville, Alison (2012-04-18)
      Identity formation is an important developmental task of the college days.Previous research has demonstrated that identity commitment,as defined by James Marcia,is related to decreased substance use and problems.That is,individuals who are identity achieved or foreclosed use substances less frequently and experience fewer substance-related problems than do individuals who are classified in the statues of identity diffused or moratorium.However,Marcia discussed identity as developing in two domains,the occupational and the ideological(religious beliefs and political ideology).To date,no studies have examined in which domain commitment is associated witha decrease in substance use and problems.Using a sample of 283 college students,the present study sought to examine the relationship between identity development in these domains and alcohol use and problems.It was hypothesized that identity commitment in the ideological domain,rather than the occupational domain,would account for the relationship between overall identity commitment and substance use and problems and that this relationship would be mediated by anxiety.Overall,the hypotheses were not supported by the data.Identity commitment was not a significant predictor of alcohol use and problems and identity crisis was a better predictor than commitment.Religious identity appeared to the best predictor of alcohol use and problems of the three identity domains.Of the separate identity status,identity achievement had the highest predictive value for alcohol use.Finally,there was no evidence in the data to support the hypothesis that any relationships between identity and alcohol variables were mediated by anxiety.Limitations of the current study include differences in sample and measures as compared to other studies,as well as a number of variables that were not measured here. Implications and applications for working with adolescents and for substance abuse treatment are discussed along with recommendations for future studies.