• Factors Affecting Retention in Online Courses

      Berling, Victoria L.
      The purpose of this study was to expand what is known regarding the factors that relate to successful completion of online, undergraduate college courses. It addressed 13 student factors available through archival data at Northern Kentucky University based on 1,493 students enrolled in fully online courses in fall 2008. It included programmatic membership as the fourteenth variable. The study employed both logistic regression analysis and multiple regression analysis. The dependent variable for the logistic regression analysis was dichotomous based on completion of all online courses with a grade of ―D‖ or better (yes or no). The dependent variable for the multiple regression analysis was a continuous variable, percentage of online courses completed. The following variables were found to have a positive relationship to successful completion of online courses: applying for financial assistance, GPA, senior year in college, major in health and human sciences, major in a STEM field, and tuition residency of metro rate. The following variables were found to have a negative relationship to successful completion of online courses: race of Black and freshman year in college. The freshman year in college only showed as a significant variable in the multiple regression analysis.
    • Factors Influencing Family Medicine Residents’ Screening for Intimate Partner Violence

      Bruder, Melissa (2014-03-18)
      Intimate partner violence among adolescents is a serious and widespread problem. It is apparent that victims of intimate partner violence experience physical and psychological consequences. These adverse health effects can result in adolescents seeking care from healthcare professionals. However, intimate partner violence victims do not always receive the care and response they need. Because adolescents are reporting that not all healthcare professionals are screening for intimate partner violence, one must come to understand the factors that are hindering this occurrence. Although previous research has provided a foundation for understanding factors that influence intimate partner violence screening, researchers have not specifically examined factors related to family medicine residents’ screening adolescent patients. The present study examined responses from 118 family medicine residents across the United States. Data were collected through an online survey and were analyzed using a multiple regression, a repeated measures ANOVA, and a one-way ANOVA. The multiple regression analysis revealed that together, year in residency, previous identification of victims of intimate partner violence, and self-efficacy significantly predicted intimate partner violence screening among adolescent patients. The repeated measures ANOVA had a statistically significant interaction effect for patient’s gender and presenting medical concern on screening adolescent patients for intimate partner violence. The one-way ANOVA revealed that the frequency of family medicine residents’ screening adolescent patients for intimate partner violence did not significantly differ among the regional locations of residency programs in the United States.
    • Factors That Impact the Perceived Confidence of Indiana Public School Principals in the Area of Special Education Practices

      Rinehart, Tara L.
      The purpose of this quantitative study was to identify factors that impact the perceived confidence of Indiana school principals in the area of special education practices. This study utilized a web-based survey to assess Indiana principals‘ perceptions about their confidence related to special education practices. The variables tested included the role prior to becoming an administrator, the years of experience as an administrator, the highest degree attained by an administrator, whether an administrator has ever participated in college coursework in the preparation program related to educating students with disabilities, and whether an administrator has ever participated in any training outside of their preparation program related to educating students with disabilities.
    • Faculty Perceptions About Attributes and Barriers Impacting the Diffusion of Online Education in Two Saudi Universities

      Alhawiti, Mohammed Mfarij (2011-06-23)
      Recognizing that faculty are an essential part of the success of any distance education program, this study sought to examine faculty perceptions of attributes and barriers impacting diffusion of online education at two Saudi universities: Taif University and Tabuk University. More specifically, the study intended to (a) give an overview of faculty members’ current stage in the innovation-decision process in regards to online education, (b) examine faculty perceptions about attributes (motivating factors) and barriers (inhibiting factors) impacting diffusion of online education, (c) investigate the relationship between faculty members’ selected personal characteristics (including age, years of teaching, DE experience, gender, academic rank, nationality, and level of education) and their perceptions about attributes (motivating factors) and barriers (inhibiting factors) impacting diffusion of online education, (d) investigate the relationship between faculty members’ selected personal characteristics (including age, years of teaching, distance education experience, gender, academic rank, professional area, nationality, and level of education) and their stage in the innovation-decision process, and (e) demonstrate how these factors can be used to increase faculty adoption of online education to respond to the increasing demands for this kind of education. Rogers’ (1995) diffusion of innovation theory was employed to discuss the findings from this study and to reveal which attributes of innovation are perceived to be important in the innovation decision process by faculty members as they decide to adopt or reject online education. Data was collected using a self-administrated and cross-sectional questionnaire. The findings revealed that the most important attribute of WBDE was relative advantage and that the main barriers that prevented faculty members from adopting online education were technical expertise, infrastructure, and planning issues. The inferential analysis showed that distance education experience was a significant predictor for faculty perceptions about relative advantage, compatibility, observability, and complexity. It also showed that age, academic rank, and level of education were significant predictors of faculty perceptions of financial concerns as a barrier to WBDE. Moreover, the relationship between DE experience and faculty’s stage in the innovation-decision process was found to be statistically significant.
    • Family factors of resilient and non-resilient children

      Williams, Roger Duane (2012-05-10)
      The focus of this study was to determine if resilient and non-resilient children could be differentially described by a sub-set of the following varibales:parental attitude toward education,sibling order,siblings who dropped out of school,family composition,parental divorce or separation,familial drug or alcohol abuse,and physical or sexual abuse.The sample of fourth,seventh,and tenth garde at-risk children was selected from data provided by Phi Delta Kappa.Of this sample,102 were determined to be resiient and 258 were determined to be non-resilient.The null hypothesis was tested by a stepwise discriminant analysis.Tests of significance were computed,ascertaining the most parsimonious subset of discriminating variables.Tests of classification accuracy and total variance explained in the dependent variables were conducted.The criterion groups were significantly differentiated by four of the seven predictor varibales.The families of resilient children were found to have a positive parental attitude toward school,higher incidences of divorce or separation within the past year,more problems with alcohol or drug use,and to be headed by a single parent.The variable contributing the most to the separation of the resilient and non-resilient groups was parental attitude toward education.Those variables that did not contribute to group diferences were sibling order,physical or sexual abuse,and sibling drop outs.Conclusions drawn from the findings of the study suggested the modearting effects of parental attitude toward schooling.In particular,the protective effect of positive attitudes toward assistance providers and taking assertive action to resolve difficulties was indicated.Proactive efforts that involve the families of at-risk children was determined to be important of training psychologists in family-oriented theories and intervention techniques was proposed.
    • Family functioning and temperament as predictors of preschoolers coping with daily stressors.

      Jones, Pamela.D (2012-04-12)
      Understanding how preschool children cope is a first step toward identifying adaptive ways of coping which reduce stress and ultimately can decrease the risk of dysfunctional behavior. However, the literature on preschooler's coping is minimal, in part due to the lack of assessment tools. This research examined preschoolers coping with daily stress in an attempt to assess what coping styles would be used across different situations.I hypothesized that family environment and temperament would affect the coping style used and that temperament would moderate the effects of the family environment.A secondary question concerned the efficiency of the coping. In order to accomplish this, a scale was developed to assess coping across four situational domains.Using mothers as the primary reporter,the preschooler's temperament,family functioning and coping behaviors were assessed and the relationships were examined.I investigated the ability of family control and cohesiveness,child temperament and an interaction of cohesiveness and temperament to predict coping styles. This model was very good at predicting coping in situations where a child was trying to master a task; adequate for predicting coping in emotional situations; and has limited predictive ability in parent-child or peer situations. There was some support for the moderating effects of temperament. Temperament was a robust predictor of coping style, whereas family cohesion was not.Other findings suggest that children who have emotional temperaments used emotional types of coping.Children in families with more interfamily cohesion, or whose parents have higher levels of education, used more cognitive behavioral-problem solving.Ratings of coping efficacy resulted in cognitive-behavioral problem solving being most effective in Mastery situations,moderate emotional coping being most effective in Parent-child domain and highly emotional coping was rated as most effective in Emotional situations.
    • FAMILY LITERACY BAGS: A RURAL-APPALACHIAN APPROACH FOR PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT AND EDUCATION

      Good Overton, Ashley (Cunningham Memorial Library, Terre Haute, Indiana State University., 2017-12)
      The purpose of this concurrent, mixed-methods study was to investigate the implementation of the non-presumptuous literacy bag program as a critical component of increasing parental involvement in rural Appalachia schools related to student literacy achievement. The program was designed to increase parental involvement in book readings and related activities. The intent of the program was to encourage parents to become actively involved in their children’s literacy and to assist children to develop stronger literacy skills. In an effort to better understand parental involvement in a rural Appalachian community, I conducted a pre-program, parental involvement questionnaire in order to gain a greater insight into their own perception of parental involvement. During the implementation of the Family Literacy Bag program, weekly surveys were collected in the form of quantitative data from parents and the teacher who participated in the research study. After the program was concluded, post-program interviews with parent participants occurred to gain a better understanding of their perceptions on how the Family Literacy Bags impacted their parental involvement at home. Overarching themes emerged from the pre-program, parental involvement questionnaires and the post-program parent interviews. The themes included; (a) parental involvement is contingent on the parents’ enjoyment about their schools and communities, (b) parents’ involvement suggested that schools be conscientious of scheduling of events and time, and (c) parents provided ideas for schools to increase attendance at parental involvement events. Additional sub-themes included the following: school leaders need to be conscientious of event times in order to coordinate with surrounding schools to plan activities, schools need to offer v different event times so that working parents can attend, and schools could offer door prizes and food to help working families. Analysis of the post-program data suggested three key themes. These themes included (a) enjoyment levels of the Family Literacy bags were contingent on activities, (b) reading strategies that were provided in the Family Literacy Bags assisted parents in their children’s reading, and (c) parents felt comfortable using the Family Literacy Bag, but constricted due to the amount of time needed to complete. Subthemes included the following: weekly bags caused fatigue with parents and students, and since the Family Literacy bags were separate from curriculum, families did not see the bags as important. The weekly parent and teacher surveys provided support for the original research questions I presented. Quantitative data collection occurred through weekly parent and weekly teacher surveys. The parent and teacher surveys sought to provide answers to the following research questions: Does a passive program such as a Literacy Bag Lending Library promote a connection between schools and home? Does an intrinsically motivated parental participation program provide parents self-efficacy in helping their children succeed in school? Would a supplementary program including reading strategies intrinsically motivate parents to assist in children’s reading education? Lastly, do school stakeholders see the literacy bag program as a worthwhile tool to increase students’ academic confidence and parental involvement? A descriptive analysis evidenced that the majority of respondents felt that the Family Literacy Bags provided a connection between home and school whereas students were encourage to participate in the reading activities with their parents. Family Literacy Bags intrinsically motivated parental participation due to the excitement that their children had for the Family Literacy Bags. The Family Literacy Bags provided parents with weekly reading skills vi and guides to assist them while working with their children. The descriptive analysis evidenced that reading guides proved to be very helpful to parents. Teacher’s thought the Family Literacy Bags were somewhat effective as a worthwhile tool to increase students’ academic confidence and parental involvement. Parents suggested the literacy bags were an effective, worthwhile tool to increase students’ academic confidence and parental involvement. Implications are also included in Chapter 5 giving school leaders ideas to increase involvement from parents and what contributes to their parental involvement in the home and at school, as well as implications for future research related to this study topic.
    • Favoritism in the schoolroom

      Ripple, Rolland R. (Rolland Ray)
      Not Available.
    • Feasibility Study of Residential Grid-Connected Solar Photovoltaic Systems in the State of Indiana

      Al-Odeh, Mahmoud
      This study aims to measure the financial viability of installing and using a residential grid-connected PV system in the State of Indiana while predicting its performance in eighteen geographical locations within the state over the system’s expected lifetime. The null hypothesis of the study is that installing a PV system for a single family residence in the State of Indiana will not pay for itself within 25 years. Using a systematic approach consisting of six steps, data regarding the use of renewable energy in the State of Indiana was collected from the website of the US Department of Energy to perform feasibility analysis of the installation and use of a standard-sized residential PV system. The researcher was not able to reject the null hypothesis that installing a PV system for a single family residence in the State of Indiana will not pay for itself within 25 years. This study found that the standard PV system does not produce a positive project balance and does not pay for itself within 25 years (the life time of the system) assuming the average cost of a system. The government incentive programs are not enough to offset the cost of installing the system against the cost of the electricity that would not be purchased from the utility company. It can be concluded that the cost of solar PV is higher than the market valuation of the power it produces; thus, solar PV did not compete on the cost basis with the traditional competitive energy sources. Reducing the capital cost will make the standard PV system economically viable in Indiana. The study found that the capital cost for the system should be reduced by 15% - 56%.
    • Feeling Special: A Study of Local, Named, Need-Based Scholarships for Remediated Community College Students

      Oler, Ronald M.
      The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of local, named, need-based scholarships on the persistence of remediated, community college students. This study sought to connect the research on college-student persistence, remedial education, and need-based scholarships. Although there is a plethora of research on why college students depart without earning a degree, there is a dearth of such work focused solely on community college students. There have also been a considerable number of studies on remedial education, but none have tied-in how the remedial student‘s self-efficacy can be increased by awarding them a scholarship, thereby improving their persistence rates. This is likely due to scholarships normally being limited to exceptional students, not the middling community college students who are required to take remedial reading, writing, or mathematics. However, the situation is a little different at Midwest Community College where such practices have become commonplace. Fifteen participants who matched all of this study‘s criteria were interviewed for this mixed-methods study after descriptive data was collected about them. These 15 participants were culled from the 4,678 first-time, associate-degree seeking students who began in the fall 2004 term at Midwest. This study used the industry-wide standard measurement of 150% time frame to earn a degree, which is three years for a two-year associate‘s degree. The overall graduation rate for this cohort was 22%. The graduation rate for the remedial students in this cohort was only 7%. This study sought to locate and interview as many of the 70 remedial students as possible, who persisted to graduate within the 150% timeframe and who had also received a scholarship. Eventually, over the course of seven months, 15 students were located and interviewed. Their stories shed light on how these, the most at-risk for dropping out, persevered to earn their associate‘s degrees. It also shed light on how receiving a scholarship boosted their belief in themselves, their self-efficacy.
    • Foraging behavior and seasonal movements of the eastern red bat(Lasiurus Borealis)in Central Indiana.

      Everson, Brianne.L (2012-04-13)
      Twenty-four female Eastern red bats(Lasiurus borealis) were captured and tracked to foraging areas near the Indianapolis International Airport during the summers of 2003 and 2004 with full foraging data obtained on 13. A series of multi-azimuth(3-7) triangulations was used to estimate the location of each bat throughout the night.Euclidean distance analysis was used to examine habitat sue by L.borealis.These bats had smaller home ranges than previously noted as well as smaller homes ranges than other species at this location.They foraged over woodlands,newly planted tree fields,open water,park and pasture lands more than predicted by randomly generated points. They avoided highly urban areas such as commercial lands,gravel pits and transportation corridors more than predicted by randomly generated points.Four female L.borealis were tracked leaving the study site between 15 July and 15 August in 2003 and 2004.Simultaneously,signals were lost on four additional radio-tagged bats.Long-term capture rates of adult L.borealis were examined during 3 netting periods(15 May-15 June,15 June-15 July and 15 July-15 August) from 1998-1999,2002-2004.Nearly twice as many adult L.borealis were captured in the third round of netting compared to the previous two rounnds.Based on a comparison of bats radio-tracked leaving the study area with typical home rage sizes of L.borealis at this site, an increase in lost radio tags,and an increase in capture rates of adult female L.borealis during late summer,it appears that L.borealis begins migrating through the study area in late July.Telemetry data indicate their movement through central Indiana is from east tp west,instead of north to south as idicated in large-scale analyses.
    • Foreign Language Anxiety in the Classroom and in on Online Environment

      Báez-Holley, Monica (2014-03-18)
      This study compared the levels of anxiety that students experienced when taking a foreign language in the classroom with those taking a foreign language at a distance. It also aimed to determine if the student’s academic performance in the course could be predicted by his or her foreign language anxiety level. The sample consisted of 107 undergraduate students (57 traditional classroom students and 50 online students) enrolled in SPAN 101 at Indiana State University in the spring of 2012. Participants were asked to complete the L120 Questionnaire 2 developed by Hurd (2003). The original version of the instrument was used with the online students and a modified version with the classroom students. The results of this study indicated that there was no difference in the levels of foreign language anxiety experienced between classroom and online students. It was concluded that students’ anxiety level was not a good predictor of final test scores in either environment.
    • Francesca da Rimini in dramatic literature

      Lattin, Bill (2013-04-09)
      Not Available
    • Friendships,romantic relationsips,and the importance of self-expansion.

      Kashiwabara, Mami (2012-04-23)
      Self-expansion theory (Aron & Aron, 1986) posits that individuals enter and maintain relationships in order to expand their sense of self and suggests that expanding the sense of self is a basic human motivation. In this study, I examined whether the perceived opportunities for self-expansion within a relationship predicted feelings of closeness and passion for a partner, and unlike many previous studies, I explored the importance of self-expansion in friendships as well as romantic relationships. I also explored individual differences in the importance of self-expansion opportunities in predicting closeness and passion. The results suggest that opportunities for self-expansion may motivate involvement in both friendships and romantic relationships, although the experience may be different in the two categories of relationship. The results also suggest that there may be individual differences in the importance of self-expansion, but these patterns were not as expected. I discuss the implications of these results for self-expansion theory and understanding close relationships.