• Health habits of high school girls

      Shattuck, Ruth (2012-08-17)
      Not Available.
    • Hear My Voice: An Examination of the Views of Parents Who Are Raising Children of African American Descent

      Phelps, Chavez Maurice (2012-01-13)
      Researchers have demonstrated that children who attend early childhood education programs benefit academically and socially (National Institute for Early Education Research, 2003). However, other researchers have shown that African American students may still lag behind their counterparts when they enter school (National Center for Education Statistics ([NCES], 2004). To explain this phenomenon, scholars and practitioners have relied on deficit theories, such as Ruby Payne’s (2005) culture of poverty theory or John Ogbu’s (1992) oppositional culture identity theory, which shift the blame solely on the child or their parents. However, there are other researchers who have stressed the importance of examining the impact of racism and classism on African American children’s academic success. The purpose of this study is to provide a voice to parents of children who are of African American descent. Specifically, I examined parents’ perspectives on early academic success and various factors that impact their children’s success using Bronfenbrenner’s (1979) ecological systems theory and Spencer’s (1995) phenomenological variant of ecological systems theory (PVEST) as frameworks. To develop an understanding of early academic success from the perspective of parents, qualitative methodology was chosen, specifically grounded theory. Fourteen families who lived in a Midwest city or town, particularly mothers and their children, participated in this study. Data resources included two interviews, journals, and academic and social skills screeners. The data were analyzed based on parents’ degree status and marital status as well as grade, gender, and disability status of their child.Results show that parents define early academic success as acquiring the following: literacy, numeracy, and social skills. The participants stressed the importance of parents and teacher characteristics as important to their children’s early academic success. Furthermore, these parents believed that family factors such as a structured and consistent family routine are relevant to academic achievement. In terms of neighborhood factors, parents believed that a quiet and peaceful neighborhood as well as a neighborhood that valued and foster academic achievement as a community is crucial. Participants stressed the importance that their children should participate in various activities such as sports and music and dance classes. Their children should possess such values as respect and compassion, which are necessary to be successful. Additionally, the participants discussed their various teaching strategies and the importance of spending time with their children. Finally, the participants discussed the conversations they have with their children regarding race and how their children’s school and teachers embrace their children’s heritage.
    • Henry David Thoreau and Amos Bronson Alcott : a study of relationships

      Henry, Frances Harriet (2012-08-17)
      Not Available.
    • High School Principals‟ Attitudes toward the Implementation of E-administration in Kuwait‟s Public Schools

      AlShammari, Iqbal Abeid
      The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of high school principals toward the implementation of electronic administration (E-administration) in public schools in Kuwait. To collect data, the researcher used a questionnaire and employed a quantitative technique. The researcher distributed 135 surveys to all high school principals in public schools in Kuwait. The response rate reached 83.7%. Both descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were conducted to analyze data. For each variable frequency and percentages were calculated. For all Likert-type scale variables, means and standard deviations were calculated. There was no statistically significant difference between respondents regarding all variables. However, the MANOVA analysis in the current study reported only one significant positive interaction between gender (male and female) and having ICDL (p-value= 0.028). Positive response rates in terms of the advantages, the most important factors enabling the implementation and the main obstacles facing the implementation of E-administration were generally high and may reflect the readiness to implement E-administration. Results from this study may provide baseline information for implementing E-administration in Kuwait and the Middle East. This study suggests that governments and policy makers gradually implement E-administration through a well organized plan. Therefore, a well organized plan should include all factors that enable the implementation. Furthermore, the study recommends that policy makers should offer rich professional development regarding E-administration in order to raise the awareness and acceptance of E-administration implementation. Also, it is recommended that governments provide support, financial aid and more decentralization.
    • High-Fidelity Manikin-Based Simulation: A Study of Implications for Interprofessional Healthcare Practitioner Education at the Associate Degree Level of Study

      Fowler, Luster
      Healthcare practitioner training programs, specifically at the associate degree level of study, have historically focused practitioner training efforts on discipline-specific programming and curricula. However, these institutions have now begun to examine the utility and efficacy of incorporating interprofessional experiences into their programs. One of the current pedagogical approaches being investigated is the use of high-fidelity manikin-based simulation in the training of their healthcare students. This study examined the use of interprofessional high-fidelity versus low-fidelity simulation within associate degree-granting institutions and examined potential differences in self-efficacy and learning outcomes of participants incorporating a preand post-assessment. A convenience sample of 75 students participated in this study, which included associate degree-seeking nursing students (n = 36) and associate degree-seeking respiratory care students (n = 39). Participants were divided into two groups: a high-fidelity group (n = 52) and a lowfidelity group (n = 23). Each group was composed of both nursing and respiratory care students. A subsequent assessment of pre-intervention and post-intervention self-efficacy and learning outcomes was also performed that examined students by course of study, identified as either nursing students or respiratory care students. Differences in self-efficacy between the high-and low-fidelity groups were not significant on pre-assessment or post-assessment, p = .529 and p = .246. Additionally, differences between nursing and respiratory care students were not significant on pre-assessment or post- assessment, p = .079 and p = .779 respectively. Differences in perceived learning outcomes between the high-and low-fidelity groups were not significant on pre-assessment or post-assessment, p = .747 and p = .219. Additionally, differences between nursing and respiratory care students were not significant on pre or postassessment,p = .408 and p = .611 respectively.
    • History of education in Posey County

      Meadows, A. L. (Adrian Lucy)
      Not Available.
    • History of the Indiana State Teachers College

      Allen, Max P. (Max Printy) (2012-06-22)
      Not Available.
    • History of the radio division of Indiana State Teachers College

      Morgan, Ruth Holaday (2013-03-15)
      Not Available.
    • Holocene Landscape Evolution of the Ohio River Valley from Knob Creek to Rosewood Bottom

      De Rego, Kathryn G. (2012-10-19)
      Rivers and floodplain environments have provided human settlements with resources for thousands of years. By understanding how rivers shape the land around them, we can use landforms to reconstruct ancient fluvial processes and to examine how they have conditioned the way humans interact with their environment. This study investigates the Lower Ohio River during the Holocene. During this period, Midwestern landscapes were adjusting to a variety of processes, including millennial-scale climate change involving the transition from a glacial to an interglacial environment. At the same time, Archaic hunter-gatherers adopted a settlement strategy that favored large river valleys. The cause of this shift has not been resolved. This study examined floodplain sedimentation and change along the Lower Ohio from Knob Creek to Rosewood Bottom through two different scales of analysis: the regional (geologic) scale and within local bottoms. A model of floodplain structure from Madison to Tell City, Indiana was created using a GIS and used to examine differences between geologic regions and Early and Late Holocene sediment. Swales were identified using a DEM, and depth, area, and perimeter-area ratio were used as proxies of their characteristics, which are correlated with backwater environments. Subsurface soil and sediment data were collected from a transect across Rosewood Bottom and within a paleochannel common to the study reach and used to reconstruct floodplain production within an individual bottom. Radiocarbon dates from geologic and archaeological contexts were used to examine Early and Late Holocene sedimentation rates. The Ohio River was active during the Early Holocene. It migrated rapidly and constructed most of the modern floodplain. In some areas, it was anabranching because resistant Pleistocene braid bars formed obstructions to flow that became islands. During the Late Holocene, deposition has been mainly characterized by overbank backwater/slackwater deposition in swales. There is not enough evidence to assign an exogenic cause to this phenomenon. Significant differences in floodplain structure between individual bottoms and regions, the influence of underlying Pleistocene gravels on river migration, and different dates for paleochannel abandonment are indicators of autogenic controls on the Ohio’s behavior and show that bottoms have independent histories. This study complements current models of environmental change for river basins in the Midwest, but it suggests that the stability of the floodplain be given more consideration when analyzing Archaic settlement strategy.
    • Hope and Spirituality and Their Relationship to The Overall Quality of Life in Cancer Patients

      Burt, Nathaniel
      In this study, hope, spirituality, stage of cancer, age, and gender were explored as predictors of the quality of life perceived by 100 cancer patients. The instruments used were the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy—Spirituality Well-Being, the Herth Hope Index, and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy. The patients were being treated at two oncology medical centers in the mid-western region of the United States. The main findings indicated a predictive relationship between spirituality, hope, stage of cancer, age, gender, and quality of life. A simultaneous multiple regression analysis, using quality of life as a dependent variable and spirituality, hope, stage of cancer, age, and gender as independent variables, indicated that patients with a high level of hope and spirituality and an earlier cancer stage reported having a greater quality of life. Age and gender had no significant predictive relationship with patient quality of life. Further findings indicated that spirituality and hope were positively correlated. Hope and stage of cancer, as well as spirituality and stage of cancer were found not to be significantly related, suggesting that neither hope nor spirituality significantly change as a result of the stage of cancer. The results of this study have implications concerning the relevance of hope and spirituality in the treatment of cancer patients and the impact of hope and spirituality on cancer patients' perceived quality of life.
    • Housing of men students, Indiana State Teachers College

      Selsam, William C. (2012-08-13)
      Not Available.
    • How a principal's knowledge and experience impact literacy achievement for English language learners

      Hardy, Pamela S.
      The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the impact of the knowledge and experience of elementary principals in the area of best practice in literacy instruction for English language learners (ELLs) and the potential impact on student achievement of ELLs. This study explored the principals’experience in education as a predictor of the principals’ knowledge of best practice in literacy instruction for ELLs and found it was not a predictor. Additionally, this study examined the principals’ experience as a building leader as a predictor of the level of implementation of best practice in literacy instruction for ELLs and found it was not a predictor. This study also examined the relationship between principals’ knowledge of best practice in literacy instruction for ELLs and the level of implementation of these same best practices in literacy instruction for ELLs in the principals' schools. Using a Pearson’s correlation, this study found a strong correlation between the principals’ knowledge of best practice in literacy instruction for ELLs and the schools’ level of implementation of this same best practice. Finally, this study examined the impact of the principals’ experience in education, the principals’ experience as a principal, the principal’s experience in the current school, the level of the principal’s knowledge of best practice in literacy instruction for ELLs, and the level of implementation of these best practices in literacy instruction for ELLs on ELL achievement, as measured with the Grade 3 Indiana Reading Evaluation and Determination (I-READ-3) statewide reading assessment. This study found no impact of these factors on student achievement as measured with the I-READ-3 assessment. This study provides additional information to principals who serve student populations with ELLs. It contributes to the growing body of research in identifying factors of principal characteristics that contribute to student learning and achievement. This research provides additional information to educators about the significance of principals being instructional leaders who serve all students.