• Nature in the poetry of Emily Dickinson

      Watson, Charles Mitchell (2013-04-09)
      Not Available.
    • Neural Network Classification of Hyperspectral Imagery for Urban Environments: a Case Study

      Lulla, Vijay (2010-09-22)
      Urban environments are complex because many different artificial and natural objects occur in close proximity. Being able to understand the processes and workings of these environments requires the ability to observe and record data with high spatial and spectral resolution. Hyperspectral sensors have been gaining popularity for this task as they are becoming more affordable. In this research, a commonly used maximum likelihood (ML) classifier and artificial neural network (ANN) classifier have been compared for classifying urban land use and land cover (LULC) using AISA+ hyperspectral data. Further, the best set of bands were identified for classification of urban areas for use in ANN classification. Optimum bands based on a spectral separability measure were used with a neural network classifier to compare its performance with maximum likelihood classifier. It was found that both the classifiers had an overall classification accuracy of more than 80% and the neural network classifier with optimum band selection performed better in all of the study sites.
    • New Methods To Manage Design Firms

      Yousaf, Mohammed (2012-05)
      As a child, I lived in a small city in Jordan called Irbid, where a lot of people knew each other, and I would wake up to my family chatting in the morning. When I was 18 years old, I left my country for the first time to visit Syria. It was very nice to get to know a different culture; it gave me a new perspective on communication. After that I started travelling a lot
    • Nontraditional-age women graduates from a distance program: contributors to choosing psychology as a major

      Fischer, Jackie
      The purpose of this qualitative research study was to identify the contributing factors that led nontraditional-age female college students studying in a distance format to choose psychology as a major. Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews, as well as short essays and demographic questionnaires completed by the participants. The results were examined within the context of Lent and Brown’s (2013) social cognitive career theory (SCCT). The application of SCCT led to the examination of how the women overcame real and perceived barriers to degree attainment. Data analysis using the lens of liberal feminist theory exposed some of the social constructs that existed as the p articipants pursued their bachelor’s degrees. The following primary themes were identified: (a) a sense of benevolence leads nontraditional-age female college students to choose psychology as a major, (b) family and community support is critical for degree attainment for nontraditional-age women who study in a distance format, (c)nontraditional-age women choose a distance program because of its practicality and flexibility, (d) specific skills and traits contribute to the success of nontraditional-age female college students, and (e) nontraditional-age women who completed their degrees in psychology in a distance program experience personal and professional transformation. Implications for theory, practice, and research are also presented.
    • Novel Phytol-Derived Immunostimulants (PHIS-01) for Enhancement of Vaccine Efficacy: A Comparative Study

      Youssef, Aachoui (2011-09-16)
      Adjuvants are used widely in vaccine formulations. However for humans, choices are very limited. Since they are selected empirically, it is not expected that any two adjuvants would influence immune mechanisms the same way. However they all influence host microenvironment, antigen presentation, and retention of immunological memory. This study focuses on new terpenoid adjuvants based on phytol derivatives. We previously observed that phytol and one of its derivatives PHIS-01 (a phytol-based immunostimulant, phytanol) are excellent adjuvants. To gain an understanding of the structural features important for adjuvanticity, we further studied compounds derived from a diterpene Phytol. We designed two new phytol derivatives, PHIS-02 and PHIS-03 (aminated and mannosylated compounds respectively). In this study we investigated their relative safety and efficacy compared to PHIS- 01 (phytanol) and other commonly used adjuvants that include alum, Freunds’ adjuvants and SIS (extra-cellular matrix). In addition, we examined how changes at the polar terminus affect adjuvanticity of PHIS-01, PHIS-02, PHIS-03 in term of host microenvironment and safety profile. Using these adjuvants as emulsions with different soluble protein antigens, ovalbumin and a hapten-protein conjugate phthalate-KLH, we evaluated in both autoimmune resistant and susceptible murine models. The following immunological parameters were studied: 1) effects on antibody responses in terms of titers, specificities and isotypic profiles; 2) effects on T-helper cells, cytokines, and chemokines milieu; 3) involvements of apoptotic and/or necrotic activity and inflammasome pathways as their primary modes of action. Our results indicate that: 1)modified phytol-derived adjuvants significantly augment antibody response of isotypes IgG1 and IgG2a, promote effective T cell proliferation and exhibit no adverse autoimmune anti-DNA response in either autoimmune or non autoimmune mice. 2) Phytol derivatives function by activation of antigen-presenting cells involving apoptotic/necrotic effects on target cells. 3) Phytol derivatives improve vaccine immunogenicity by promoting regulated and nonpathogenic inflammatory changes in the immediate microenvironments, as characterized by mobilization of chemo tactic factors (MCP-1, KC, MIP-1, LIX, lymphotactin, eotaxin), growth factors (MCSF, GCSF, GM-CSF), and cytokines that mobilize innate and adaptive immunity and lead to T helper polarization and a magnified antibody response 4) PHIS -01, compared to PHIS-03 and alum , is a better activator of genes in the inflammasome pathways. In conclusion, our findings also clearly highlight the importance of bonds and functional moieties in shaping the adjuvanticity of phytol derivatives. Hydrogenation of phytol generates PHIS-01 which is a very safe and superior adjuvant in terms of the quality and magnitude of the overall immune response evoked. However, modification of its polar terminus of PHIS-01 with a hydrophilic mannose moiety (PHIS-03) profoundly changes the cytokine/chemokine milieu and favors T-helper type 2 rather than the T-helper type1 induced by PHIS-01.
    • Occupational Survey of Jasper, Indiana.

      Brollier, Richard Allen
      Not available.
    • Olfactory Mate Choice and Potential Chemical Signals of the White-Throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis)

      Sebastian, Peter (2011-03-15)
      Chemical odor signals are well documented in mammals, and yet almost nothing is known about the use of chemical odor signals in birds due to the traditional view that birds have a no sense or a poor sense of smell. Recent studies have revealed the traditional view to be unfounded, but more work is necessary to 1) expand our knowledge of avian olfaction in passerine species and 2) determine whether birds utilize chemical signals. The aim of this thesis was to 1) test for olfactory-based choice in a passerine species, and examine the chemical composition of preen oil for potential chemical signals. Results suggest that the polymorphic white-throated sparrow does choose between odors from their own bedding and odors from fresh bedding based on their unique disassortative mating, with tan males and white females choosing fresh bedding over their own and white males and tan females choosing their own bedding over fresh bedding. Additionally, a study on captive white-throated sparrows found that multiple preen oil volatile compounds were seasonally elevated during the breeding season, and thus indicate the possibility of these compounds acting as chemical signals. In wild populations, preen oil composition varied by morph-sex classes as well as by year sampled, and some compounds may even change throughout the course of the breeding season. Comparisons between wild populations and captive birds indicate that captive conditions may also alter preen oil composition.
    • Oliver Cromwell:change and continuity

      Ellis, Kari.L (2012-04-12)
      This study looks at the life of Oliver Cromwell,Lord Protector of England in an effort to clarify the diverse and conflicting interpretations resulting from a lack of agreement between those who are biased for and against the Lord Protector.The purpose of the study of this conflicting information is not to settle whether Cromwell was a good figure or bad, but to define more clearly his time.Cromwell, clarified creates a broader understanding of the seventeenth century Englishman.An introduction develops a brief summarization of Pre-Reformation Europe,the forces which brought changes,Reformation Europe and the Post-Reformation era in which Cromwell lived.The non-Cromwellian periods were included to develop a broader picture for the reader of the atmosphere into which Cromwell emerged.The study concentrates on six key points of conflict within the lifetime of Cromwell and discussion of those conflicts through use of periods or roles within his life.Cromwell's changeable nature does not lend itself to a static,one dimensional interpretation, but rather to one that attempts to incorporate the normal fluctuations of human nature and the continuity of change.This study concludes with no-earth shattering developments,but with the assertion that Cromwell's seeming inconsistencies are indicative of a man who illustrates not the static,stiffness which brings frequently disastrous results,but rather his openness to change.He is a prime example of how the only constant in life is change.Finally,the conclusion is a call to other students of history for recognition of the need for further action in defining not only Cromwell, but his time and a thorough investigation and study of the seventeenth century through interpretive works.
    • Online Pump Efficiency

      Wilkerson, Bruce
      Knowing the efficiency of a pumping unit has important operational and financial benefits to those who operate the unit. Historically efficiency is collected on a periodic basis through on-site collection of the necessary parameters. Unit efficiency can be calculated on a real time basis by combining telemetered data with fluid properties in a Real Time Transient Model (RTTM). This method however needs to be validated in order to ensure it is equivalent to field efficiency testing. The RTTM was expanded to be able to calculate unit efficiency utilizing telemetered data and modeled fluid properties. Three crude oil and two refined products units were configured in the model to perform the calculations. Data from each of the units was stored in a relational database for later analysis. Date and time, efficiency ratio (current efficiency/manufacturer’s efficiency), flow rate and viscosity were stored once every fifteen minute. Field efficiency test data was retrieved and then compared to the telemetered data. A deviation of one percent or less was considered acceptable. Where the two methods did not correlate within the required one percent, the data was analyzed to determine the root cause. Errors in the model’s algorithms and potential errors in field data collection account for all departures. This research supports the use of the RTTM to calculate unit efficiency.
    • OPERATIONALIZING HUMILITY: A MODEL OF SITUATIONAL HUMILITY FOR CHRISTIAN COLLEGE STUDENT LEADERS

      Barrett, Scott T. (Cunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State University, 2017-12)
      This research study explored how college student leaders operationalize humility in their actions and what leads individuals to act with situational humility. There is a rise in narcissistic tendencies in college students (Twenge, Konrath, Campbell, & Bushman, 2008a, 2008b) and a decline in overall character traits (Burns, 2012; Hunter, 2000; Liddell & Cooper, 2012). Opposite the vice of narcissism sits the virtue of humility (Emmons, 2000; Exline & Geyer, 2004; Peterson & Seligman, 2004; Tangney, 2000). Using a grounded theory approach, the researcher looked to discover the process of humility development. Twenty six in depth interviews were conducted at three institutions. Each institution was a member of the Council of Christian Colleges and Universities and each participant identified as having a Christian belief system. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed. Transcriptions were coded using grounded theory method of open, axial, and selective coding. Based on the data collected three main themes emerged. Faith and humility go hand in hand, sense of self impacts humbling experiences, and the effect of relationships on humility. Through this research, the model of situational humility emerged grounded in the data. The model of situational humility describes what leads an individual to act with humility within a specific humbling experience. For these students, humbling experiences occurred when their sense of self (“I am an athlete,” “I get things done on time,” “I am a not racist”) did not line of up with their experience of the world (physical injury, failing to send necessary emails, making comments that were received as racial insensitive by a peer). Individuals then move to iv the point of change where they must decide how whether they will reorient their sense of self or actions or if they will not reorient and act with pride. In this point of change individuals were positively impacted towards humility by their Christian belief system, empathy, being in relationship, and interacting with others who were different from them. The implications of this research for institutional leaders who desire to grow humility in students include valuing how humility is seen as a virtue, growing empathy in students, and providing opportunities for students to be in relationship with others, specifically those who are different from them.
    • Optimal Experience in Relationships, Activities, and Beyond: Connecting Flow with Self-Expansion

      Dean, Brandy M. (2010-05-11)
      Flow is a state of optimal experience characterized by complete immersion in an enjoyable activity and has been associated with positive experience in activities. Self-expansion is a state of increase in the diversity and complexity of the self and has been linked with positive experience in relationships. Despite phenomenological similarities, the connection between these two states has not been examined. The current study used a correlational design to explore the degrees of overlap between these states by comparing them in general, situation-specific, and predictive contexts. It was expected that flow and self-expansion would occur at similar frequencies, be produced by similar situations, be positively correlated within given activities and relationships, similarly predict attraction to other within a given relationship, and be similarly predicted by a personality trait. Results indicated that these experiences do tend to cooccur. Among students reporting both experiences, the frequencies of the experiences were positively related, although flow experiences were reported as more frequent. Flow and selfexpansion experiences were produced by similar sources across activities and relationships, and students tended to specify the same type of activity or relationship as the source of both experiences. As expected, flow and self-expansion were positively related within a given activity and within a given relationship. Both flow and self-expansion experienced in a relationship were positively related to attraction to the other, although the relationship between self-expansion and attraction was stronger than the relationship between flow and attraction. Neither flow nor self expansion experienced in an activity was related to trait happiness, and there was no significant difference between these correlations. These results are reviewed in the context of previous research, and implications for theory, research, and practice are discussed. Finally, considerations for future research comparing these two theories, as well as other varieties of positive experience, are discussed.
    • Organizations as Consumers of Human Capital Via Technology: A Policy Study of Information And Communication Technologies

      Zuppo, Colrain M.
      Organizations are consumers of human capital through technological means. Flexibility in work hours and locations can assist employee productivity; however, it can also foster a blurred distinction between work time and personal time (Robbins & Judge, 2007). Employees are given the tools to stay connected outside of a straightforward 40 hour work week in the name of enhanced productivity and/or flexibility with regard to their work arrangements. Organizational policies regarding ICTs have been limited to proscriptive measures (e.g. prohibiting installation of specific applications or downloads) as opposed to providing managerial parameters in the form of formal or informal policies.The purpose of this research was to provide a view of the multifaceted problem of managing technology (specifically ICTs) while balancing the needs of the humans within organizations who utilize those technologies. This dissertation investigated whether or not organizations have policies concerning employees’ constant connectivity to work during non-working hours through ICTs. This research also examined whether HR professionals, who would typically be involved in the formation of organizational policy, anticipated the formation and adoption of policies regarding employees’ usage of organizationally-provided/subsidized ICTs during non-working hours. Based upon data collected, a framework for a best-practices policy model was developed.
    • The Other I

      Snyder, Andrew (2012-04)
      I have always been interested in the idea of duality. By this I am referring to the two sides, or personalities, of a person, the side that is presented to the world, and the side that that is hidden. The term Alter Ego, which is Latin for "other I" began being used in the nineteenth century when psychologists first started diagnosing Dissociative Identity Disorder, or Multiple Personality Disorder. This disorder has the characteristics of having two or more different personalities that can take control of an individual's character1
    • Ozonexus

      Pothumarthi, Kartheeka (2012-04-26)
      I love nature. I had a very strong connection with nature from my childhood. Most of my childhood was spent playing in the garden, staring at the water of a small pond near my house, collecting flowers and preserving them in thick sheets and arranging them into greeting cards. That was my first attempt to be creative and design something new. I cherish the moments where I tried to catch the butterflies (but failed to catch them), running behind the flying dandelion seeds and enjoying the warm sun rays. As years passed by my world started a rapid shift from garden to a pile of books, a computer and a mobile phone. I slowly stopped my usual visits to the garden and that small pond because I was busy finishing my homework, texting and chatting with friends
    • Parental compliance to clinical recommendations in an ADHD clinic.

      Thibodeau, Alice Samantha (2012-04-26)
      Psychological assessments are a cornerstone of clinical practice in psychology,but if results and recommendations are not used to guide treatment interventions, their value is greatly diminished. Currently, there is very little research that examines adherence to treatment recommendations given to parents or caregivers following psychological evaluations of their children. The present study expands on previous research (MacNaughton & Rodrigue, 2001) examining perceived barriers to parental compliance with psychological assessment recommendations by considering the impact of severity of child behavior problems and parenting stress on compliance. Eighty caregiver/child dyads were recruited through an ADHD evaluation clinic and caregivers completed a telephone interview approximately 4 to 6 weeks after receiving recommendations for their children's care. It was predicted that parents/caregivers reporting greater levels of stress would report lower levels of compliance; parents/caregivers reporting greater levels of compliance would report greater improvement in children's behavior; parents/caregivers would report compliance to less than 70% of the recommendations (MacNaughton & Rodrigue, 2001) and the recommendation to which parents/caregivers most commonly adhered would be that of consulting with a non-psychological professional (i.e., physician). Results revealed that caregivers reporting greater levels of parenting stress were more likely to report following recommendations, that greater levels of compliance were associated with greater levels of improvement, that caregivers reported adherence to 81.5% of recommendations, and that caregivers were equally likely to engage in active self-help recommendations (i.e., parent education on ADHD) and those for professional nonpsychological services (i.e. consulting with a physician for medication) and least likely to follow through on recommendations for psychological services (child. or family counseling). The most commonly reported barriers to following recommendations were 1) that caregivers had not had time to comply and 2) that teachers were uncooperative with implementing school-based recommendations.