• Occupational Survey of Jasper, Indiana.

      Brollier, Richard Allen
      Not available.
    • Olfactory Mate Choice and Potential Chemical Signals of the White-Throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis)

      Sebastian, Peter (2011-03-15)
      Chemical odor signals are well documented in mammals, and yet almost nothing is known about the use of chemical odor signals in birds due to the traditional view that birds have a no sense or a poor sense of smell. Recent studies have revealed the traditional view to be unfounded, but more work is necessary to 1) expand our knowledge of avian olfaction in passerine species and 2) determine whether birds utilize chemical signals. The aim of this thesis was to 1) test for olfactory-based choice in a passerine species, and examine the chemical composition of preen oil for potential chemical signals. Results suggest that the polymorphic white-throated sparrow does choose between odors from their own bedding and odors from fresh bedding based on their unique disassortative mating, with tan males and white females choosing fresh bedding over their own and white males and tan females choosing their own bedding over fresh bedding. Additionally, a study on captive white-throated sparrows found that multiple preen oil volatile compounds were seasonally elevated during the breeding season, and thus indicate the possibility of these compounds acting as chemical signals. In wild populations, preen oil composition varied by morph-sex classes as well as by year sampled, and some compounds may even change throughout the course of the breeding season. Comparisons between wild populations and captive birds indicate that captive conditions may also alter preen oil composition.
    • Oliver Cromwell:change and continuity

      Ellis, Kari.L (2012-04-12)
      This study looks at the life of Oliver Cromwell,Lord Protector of England in an effort to clarify the diverse and conflicting interpretations resulting from a lack of agreement between those who are biased for and against the Lord Protector.The purpose of the study of this conflicting information is not to settle whether Cromwell was a good figure or bad, but to define more clearly his time.Cromwell, clarified creates a broader understanding of the seventeenth century Englishman.An introduction develops a brief summarization of Pre-Reformation Europe,the forces which brought changes,Reformation Europe and the Post-Reformation era in which Cromwell lived.The non-Cromwellian periods were included to develop a broader picture for the reader of the atmosphere into which Cromwell emerged.The study concentrates on six key points of conflict within the lifetime of Cromwell and discussion of those conflicts through use of periods or roles within his life.Cromwell's changeable nature does not lend itself to a static,one dimensional interpretation, but rather to one that attempts to incorporate the normal fluctuations of human nature and the continuity of change.This study concludes with no-earth shattering developments,but with the assertion that Cromwell's seeming inconsistencies are indicative of a man who illustrates not the static,stiffness which brings frequently disastrous results,but rather his openness to change.He is a prime example of how the only constant in life is change.Finally,the conclusion is a call to other students of history for recognition of the need for further action in defining not only Cromwell, but his time and a thorough investigation and study of the seventeenth century through interpretive works.
    • Online Pump Efficiency

      Wilkerson, Bruce
      Knowing the efficiency of a pumping unit has important operational and financial benefits to those who operate the unit. Historically efficiency is collected on a periodic basis through on-site collection of the necessary parameters. Unit efficiency can be calculated on a real time basis by combining telemetered data with fluid properties in a Real Time Transient Model (RTTM). This method however needs to be validated in order to ensure it is equivalent to field efficiency testing. The RTTM was expanded to be able to calculate unit efficiency utilizing telemetered data and modeled fluid properties. Three crude oil and two refined products units were configured in the model to perform the calculations. Data from each of the units was stored in a relational database for later analysis. Date and time, efficiency ratio (current efficiency/manufacturer’s efficiency), flow rate and viscosity were stored once every fifteen minute. Field efficiency test data was retrieved and then compared to the telemetered data. A deviation of one percent or less was considered acceptable. Where the two methods did not correlate within the required one percent, the data was analyzed to determine the root cause. Errors in the model’s algorithms and potential errors in field data collection account for all departures. This research supports the use of the RTTM to calculate unit efficiency.
    • OPERATIONALIZING HUMILITY: A MODEL OF SITUATIONAL HUMILITY FOR CHRISTIAN COLLEGE STUDENT LEADERS

      Barrett, Scott T. (Cunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State University, 2017-12)
      This research study explored how college student leaders operationalize humility in their actions and what leads individuals to act with situational humility. There is a rise in narcissistic tendencies in college students (Twenge, Konrath, Campbell, & Bushman, 2008a, 2008b) and a decline in overall character traits (Burns, 2012; Hunter, 2000; Liddell & Cooper, 2012). Opposite the vice of narcissism sits the virtue of humility (Emmons, 2000; Exline & Geyer, 2004; Peterson & Seligman, 2004; Tangney, 2000). Using a grounded theory approach, the researcher looked to discover the process of humility development. Twenty six in depth interviews were conducted at three institutions. Each institution was a member of the Council of Christian Colleges and Universities and each participant identified as having a Christian belief system. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed. Transcriptions were coded using grounded theory method of open, axial, and selective coding. Based on the data collected three main themes emerged. Faith and humility go hand in hand, sense of self impacts humbling experiences, and the effect of relationships on humility. Through this research, the model of situational humility emerged grounded in the data. The model of situational humility describes what leads an individual to act with humility within a specific humbling experience. For these students, humbling experiences occurred when their sense of self (“I am an athlete,” “I get things done on time,” “I am a not racist”) did not line of up with their experience of the world (physical injury, failing to send necessary emails, making comments that were received as racial insensitive by a peer). Individuals then move to iv the point of change where they must decide how whether they will reorient their sense of self or actions or if they will not reorient and act with pride. In this point of change individuals were positively impacted towards humility by their Christian belief system, empathy, being in relationship, and interacting with others who were different from them. The implications of this research for institutional leaders who desire to grow humility in students include valuing how humility is seen as a virtue, growing empathy in students, and providing opportunities for students to be in relationship with others, specifically those who are different from them.
    • Optimal Experience in Relationships, Activities, and Beyond: Connecting Flow with Self-Expansion

      Dean, Brandy M. (2010-05-11)
      Flow is a state of optimal experience characterized by complete immersion in an enjoyable activity and has been associated with positive experience in activities. Self-expansion is a state of increase in the diversity and complexity of the self and has been linked with positive experience in relationships. Despite phenomenological similarities, the connection between these two states has not been examined. The current study used a correlational design to explore the degrees of overlap between these states by comparing them in general, situation-specific, and predictive contexts. It was expected that flow and self-expansion would occur at similar frequencies, be produced by similar situations, be positively correlated within given activities and relationships, similarly predict attraction to other within a given relationship, and be similarly predicted by a personality trait. Results indicated that these experiences do tend to cooccur. Among students reporting both experiences, the frequencies of the experiences were positively related, although flow experiences were reported as more frequent. Flow and selfexpansion experiences were produced by similar sources across activities and relationships, and students tended to specify the same type of activity or relationship as the source of both experiences. As expected, flow and self-expansion were positively related within a given activity and within a given relationship. Both flow and self-expansion experienced in a relationship were positively related to attraction to the other, although the relationship between self-expansion and attraction was stronger than the relationship between flow and attraction. Neither flow nor self expansion experienced in an activity was related to trait happiness, and there was no significant difference between these correlations. These results are reviewed in the context of previous research, and implications for theory, research, and practice are discussed. Finally, considerations for future research comparing these two theories, as well as other varieties of positive experience, are discussed.
    • Organizations as Consumers of Human Capital Via Technology: A Policy Study of Information And Communication Technologies

      Zuppo, Colrain M.
      Organizations are consumers of human capital through technological means. Flexibility in work hours and locations can assist employee productivity; however, it can also foster a blurred distinction between work time and personal time (Robbins & Judge, 2007). Employees are given the tools to stay connected outside of a straightforward 40 hour work week in the name of enhanced productivity and/or flexibility with regard to their work arrangements. Organizational policies regarding ICTs have been limited to proscriptive measures (e.g. prohibiting installation of specific applications or downloads) as opposed to providing managerial parameters in the form of formal or informal policies.The purpose of this research was to provide a view of the multifaceted problem of managing technology (specifically ICTs) while balancing the needs of the humans within organizations who utilize those technologies. This dissertation investigated whether or not organizations have policies concerning employees’ constant connectivity to work during non-working hours through ICTs. This research also examined whether HR professionals, who would typically be involved in the formation of organizational policy, anticipated the formation and adoption of policies regarding employees’ usage of organizationally-provided/subsidized ICTs during non-working hours. Based upon data collected, a framework for a best-practices policy model was developed.
    • The Other I

      Snyder, Andrew (2012-04)
      I have always been interested in the idea of duality. By this I am referring to the two sides, or personalities, of a person, the side that is presented to the world, and the side that that is hidden. The term Alter Ego, which is Latin for "other I" began being used in the nineteenth century when psychologists first started diagnosing Dissociative Identity Disorder, or Multiple Personality Disorder. This disorder has the characteristics of having two or more different personalities that can take control of an individual's character1
    • Ozonexus

      Pothumarthi, Kartheeka (2012-04-26)
      I love nature. I had a very strong connection with nature from my childhood. Most of my childhood was spent playing in the garden, staring at the water of a small pond near my house, collecting flowers and preserving them in thick sheets and arranging them into greeting cards. That was my first attempt to be creative and design something new. I cherish the moments where I tried to catch the butterflies (but failed to catch them), running behind the flying dandelion seeds and enjoying the warm sun rays. As years passed by my world started a rapid shift from garden to a pile of books, a computer and a mobile phone. I slowly stopped my usual visits to the garden and that small pond because I was busy finishing my homework, texting and chatting with friends
    • Parental compliance to clinical recommendations in an ADHD clinic.

      Thibodeau, Alice Samantha (2012-04-26)
      Psychological assessments are a cornerstone of clinical practice in psychology,but if results and recommendations are not used to guide treatment interventions, their value is greatly diminished. Currently, there is very little research that examines adherence to treatment recommendations given to parents or caregivers following psychological evaluations of their children. The present study expands on previous research (MacNaughton & Rodrigue, 2001) examining perceived barriers to parental compliance with psychological assessment recommendations by considering the impact of severity of child behavior problems and parenting stress on compliance. Eighty caregiver/child dyads were recruited through an ADHD evaluation clinic and caregivers completed a telephone interview approximately 4 to 6 weeks after receiving recommendations for their children's care. It was predicted that parents/caregivers reporting greater levels of stress would report lower levels of compliance; parents/caregivers reporting greater levels of compliance would report greater improvement in children's behavior; parents/caregivers would report compliance to less than 70% of the recommendations (MacNaughton & Rodrigue, 2001) and the recommendation to which parents/caregivers most commonly adhered would be that of consulting with a non-psychological professional (i.e., physician). Results revealed that caregivers reporting greater levels of parenting stress were more likely to report following recommendations, that greater levels of compliance were associated with greater levels of improvement, that caregivers reported adherence to 81.5% of recommendations, and that caregivers were equally likely to engage in active self-help recommendations (i.e., parent education on ADHD) and those for professional nonpsychological services (i.e. consulting with a physician for medication) and least likely to follow through on recommendations for psychological services (child. or family counseling). The most commonly reported barriers to following recommendations were 1) that caregivers had not had time to comply and 2) that teachers were uncooperative with implementing school-based recommendations.
    • Parenting a Child with Behavior Problems: Dimensions of Religiousness that Influence Parental Stress and Sense of Competence

      Weyand, Chelsea (2010-09-22)
      Parenting a child with behavior problems has been associated with an increase in parental stress and a decrease in parental sense of competence. While parental religiosity has generally been associated with greater child and parent functioning, it has been suggested that when parenting a child with behavior problems, some aspects of parental religiousness (e.g., negative religious coping, biblical conservatism) might decrease functioning. One hundred and thirty-nine parents of children between the ages of three and twelve completed a questionnaire in order to examine the influence of religious variables (sanctification of parenting, negative religious coping, positive religious coping, biblical conservatism) on the relationship between child behavior problems and parental stress and sense of competence. Sanctification of parenting was found to moderate the relationship between child behavior problems and parental stress, such that parents high in sanctification showed little change in parenting stress as severity of behavior problems increased. Similarly, positive religious coping was found to play a protective role in the relationship between behavior problems and parental sense of competence. Overall, positive religious coping was related to increased stress in parents of children with few behavior problems while not decreasing stress for parents of children with more difficult behavior. Parents of children with greater perceived behavior problems reported significantly higher sanctification of parenting and parenting stress, as well as lesser use of positive religious coping and lower sense of competence. Negative religious coping and biblical conservatism did not moderate the relationship between child behavior problems and parental stress, nor sense of competence. This study provides further clarification of the dimensions of religiousness that are relevant to the parenting experience. It also provides evidence to suggest that parental religiousness can have either a positive or negative influence on parental functioning, depending on parenting circumstances and personal perceptions of God and religion.
    • The Path To Another World

      Lu, Rio Ying-Shu (2012-08)
      I am a very ordinary girl and grew up in a very traditional Taiwanese family. We worship and pray to gods and our ancestors since our religion is Taoism. Also, we made traditional food by ourselves for some worship festivals. These are the memories of my childhood but I still can tell many details. I was standing at the side and watched when my grandparents were cooking for worship and I could try the food when they got some extra portions. The taste of the food is still on my tongue and still clear. My time with my family as a child is so sweet that I decided to create my project with those memories. Therefore, the food offerings and the worship culture in Taiwan are my original ideas for my thesis
    • Pedagogical research in chemistry, 1925-1935

      Powell, Wesley H. (2012-08-14)
      Not Available.
    • Perception of Control: Accuracy among Optimists and Pessimists on Noncontingency and Contingengy Tasks

      Baum, Spencer (2011-03-15)
      The learned helplessness theory asserts that depressed individuals unrealistically believe that they have little to no control over aversive outcomes in their lives. Paradoxically, research on judgment of control has demonstrated that depressed individuals are not necessarily pessimistic, but rather more realistic than non-depressed individuals. Most of the research on depressive realism has investigated individual’s perceived control in situations in which they have no actual control. Few studies have investigated perception of control in situations where control is possible. Considering that many circumstances in life are controllable, it is important to examine how different personality variables contribute to accurate judgments of control in controllable situations. In addition, many studies have found a negative correlation between optimism and depression and the positive correlation between depression and pessimism, yet the research on control lacks information on optimistic and pessimistic individuals’ perception of control. Using a computerized judgment of control task, the current study examined perception of control in both no-control and control situations among participants classified as either optimistic or pessimistic and as dysphoric or non-dysphoric. Measures of optimism and pessimism used in this study were the Attributional Style Questionnaire and the Life Orientation Test-Revised and the Beck Depression Inventory-II was used to assess depressogenic symptoms. Participants were 88 undergraduate students. It was hypothesized that optimistic participants would exhibit illusory control in both contingent and non-contingent situations, while the pessimistic participants would provide accurate judgments of control in the no-control situation and underestimate control in the iv control situations. Additionally, it was hypothesized that dysphoric participants would provide accurate control judgments in the no-control situation and underestimate control in the control conditions. The results provided mixed support for the study’s hypotheses. Participants with optimistic explanatory styles provided accurate control judgments in the high contingency task and overestimated control in noncontingent and low contingent tasks. Participants with pessimistic explanatory styles underestimated control in the high contingency task and overestimated in noncontingent and low contingent tasks. Contrary to the depressive realism hypothesis, dysphoric participants did not provide accurate judgments of control regardless of the contingency situation. Dysphoric participants underestimated control in the high contingency situation and overestimated control in noncontingent and low contingent tasks.
    • Perception of Social Presence in Asynchronous and Synchronous Online Discussion from The Perspective of Native and Non-Native Speaker

      Alruhaimi, Abdullah (2011-09-16)
      The technology innovation of telecommunication gave confidence to educational institutions to substitute some of their courses from traditional courses into virtual ones. This switch in education inspired globalization. The learners use either synchronous or asynchronous communication tools to interact with each other. Most previous studies in this field show that social presence is correlated with learner achievement satisfaction and interaction. So the researcher measured the level of social presence for both groups of learners, native and nonnative speakers, across both types of online communication, synchronous and asynchronous communication. The researcher conducted a 2x2 split-plot ANOVA design with repeated measure for this study. The four cells in this design help the researcher to find how every group differs in both discussion formats. The findings of this study will lend a hand to institutions, instructional designers, instructors, and software and hardware developers to improve and concentrate on preferable methods of communication for global virtual institutions. The researcher did not find a statistically significant difference between native and nonnative speakers across the methods of online communications. There was no statistically significant difference between the learners in general across the methods of online communications. But the reported low level of agreement toward the level of social presence in both methods of online communication emphasizes the importance for all people who are concerned about virtual education to work hand in hand to elevate the level of social presence in online learning.The researcher encourages those who are concerned about online learning, and education in general to be the early adopters of technology such as Smartphone applications and the advanced features of social networking such as Facebook and Google wave.