• Tasks And Responsibilities of a First-Line Supervisor in a Job Shop Manufacturing Environment in Northwest Wisconsin

      Pederson, Leonard
      The problem of this study was to identity the tasks and responsibilities of first-line supervisors in a job-shop manufacturing environment in the Northwest Wisconsin portion of the United States. The purpose of this study was to provide insight to the knowledge, skills, and abilities required of the first-line supervisors in a manufacturing environment. An understanding of these attributes would aid in the future selection of supervisory candidates, and it would assist corporate executives in the training and evaluation of personnel in supervisory positions. The methodology of this research study used a modified Delphi study process, in that it went from the literature review to the development of the tasks and responsibilities from the review of the prior research. The study was executed in four sequential phases, which at its conclusion provided a list of tasks and responsibilities. The first phase was a thorough literature review of work that had already been completed regarding managerial and supervisory tasks and responsibilities. The second phase was the pilot study and the enlistment of the panel members. The third phase was the actual Delphi process using the assembled panel, using the Internet and email to communicate. The fourth phase was the analysis and reporting of the results of the Delphi panel. The result was a list of 49 tasks. The panel estimated the time spent during their work week on each task, which accounted for 94.2% of their time. Using a Pareto concept of looking at the top 20% or top 10 items for guidance, seven of the top 10 are related to interpersonal communication and skills. These tasks only consumed 21% of their time, but constituted seven of the top 10 most important tasks as viewed by the panel.
    • Teacher Bullies: A Factorial Analysis of Perceptions of Teachers’ Bullying Behaviors

      Davies, Sally Walter (2011-09-22)
      Bullying in schools is a global phenomenon that can infringe upon the rights of students to learn and grow in a secure and fostering environment. Most of the past and current research on school bullying focuses on peer bullying, but there is a gap in the understanding of types and characteristics of bullying behaviors. This study centered on a type of abusive behavior that has received very limited attention: teachers bullying students. For the purpose of this study, the definition of teacher bullying behavior is a repeated pattern of conduct used to punish, manipulate, or disparage a student, rooted in a power differential. Such behaviors may threaten, harm, humiliate, induce fear, or cause substantial emotional distress and go beyond a reasonable disciplinary procedure. The goal of this research was to uncover categories of teacher bullying behaviors. A factor analysis was conducted on data gathered through a questionnaire created for this study. The questionnaire contains descriptions of teacher behaviors, which participants described as bullying or not bullying, as well as measures of the severity of the behavior. The sample included graduates of public or non-public high schools who are 18 years or older. Over half of the sample (64%, N = 332) reported that a teacher had bullied them at least once. The final factor analysis consisted of a two-factor solution. The two factors that emerged were based on severity of behaviors. The first factor represented particularly severe bullying behaviors, while the second factor signified behaviors considered to be mild to moderate bullying by teachers. Interestingly, bystanding behaviors by teachers loaded on the first factor, which indicate these types of behaviors were considered to be severe bullying.
    • Teacher Evaluations: Do Classroom Observations and Evaluator Training Really Matter?

      Pies, Sarah J. (Cunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State University, 2017-12)
      The purpose of this study was to determine if the minimum number of observations stated in a district’s teacher evaluation plan, observation characteristics described in a district’s evaluation plan, and the characteristic of those evaluating teachers had an impact on whether a school would receive a bonus or penalty point for Indiana’s A-F accountability model. This study analyzed both math and English/language arts bonus and penalty points for all schools whose district has been implementing the new mandated teacher evaluation plan since the 2012-2013 school year. This included 3,997 schools within 215 districts in Indiana. Overall, when predicting whether a school will receive a bonus or penalty point, the findings for math were stronger than the findings for English/language arts. When considering whether a school will receive a bonus point for math, the minimum number of observations stated in the district’s evaluation plan was a significant predictor of a bonus point by itself but has a negative relationship associated with a reduction of the probability of getting a bonus point for math. Observation characteristics also had predictors in each model, both centered on the number of required observations in the plan (the actual number or just their presence in the plan). In the models using only the number of observations as a variable, the predictors were associated with an increased likelihood in a penalty and a decreased likelihood in a bonus. For the models with evaluator characteristics data, significant factors found a negative relationship with the likelihood of a school receiving a bonus point for math. When considering whether a school will receive a bonus point for English/language arts, evaluator characteristics did not serve as significant predictors nor does v the minimum number of observations stated in the district’s evaluation plan. One significant relationship was determined in that a district stating in its evaluation plan that both pre- and post-conferences are required, including goal setting, had a positive impact on the likelihood of getting a bonus point for English/language arts versus getting no bonus or penalty.
    • Teacher Self-Efficacy Beliefs Related to Chronic Disruptive Behavior

      Jones, Kalinda R. (2011-09-20)
      In the current study, elementary teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs regarding working with students displaying chronic disruptive behavior (CDB) were explored. CDB was defined as persistent observable actions that have a negative impact on academic or social functioning. To address the infrequently researched construct of self-efficacy beliefs specific to teaching students exhibiting CDB, a modified version of the Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy Scale (short form) was used. Factor analysis results indicated the three self-efficacy factors of instructional strategies self-efficacy, classroom management self-efficacy, and student engagement self-efficacy. No significant relationships were found between each of the three types of teacher self-efficacy beliefs and the combination of the demographic variables of education level, years of teaching experience, and gender. No significant difference was found in self-efficacy beliefs among the teaching focus areas of general education, special education, and specialty education. Potential relationships were explored with each type of teacher self-efficacy beliefs and teachers’ current and past experience working with students displaying CDB, past training and desire for future professional development related to working with students with CDB, and perceived support when working with students displaying CDB. Past training and perceived support were significantly related to both instructional self-efficacy beliefs and student engagement self-efficacy beliefs. Previous experience, past training, and perceived support were significantly related to classroom management self-efficacy beliefs. Implications for research and practice regarding teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs when working with students displaying chronic disruptive behavior are discussed.
    • Teachers’ Perceptions toward Enhancing Learning through Multiple Intelligences Theory in Elementary School: A Mixed Methods Study

      Al-Wadi, Nouf I. (2012-01-19)
      The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of multiple intelligences theory on elementary students’ academic achievement and to investigate teacher perceptions of multiple intelligences theory. The multiple intelligences school that was chosen for this study was Edwin Rhodes Elementary School. The study examined Edwin Rhodes Elementary School performance via the California Academic Performance Index. Edwin Rhodes School scores were compared with similar traditional school scores and with gifted and talented scores. The study found that the multiple intelligences school performance was between traditional and gifted and talented school performances. The study also explored teachers’ perceptions at Edwin Rhodes School toward multiple intelligences theory using a cross-sectional survey. The results of the study showed that teachers were familiar with the theory of multiple intelligences, but they did not have formal education about it, either in a teacher education program or through professional development.
    • Terre Haute during the Civil War

      Ridgley, Ronald H. (2013-05-03)
      Not Available.
    • Terre Haute milk--from producer to consumer

      Turner, Paul K. (2013-02-26)
      Not available.
    • Terrorizing the 'Fortress of London'? German Bombings, Public Pressure, and the Creation of the British Home Defense System in World War I

      Platt, Brandon (2010-07-20)
      Aeronautical warfare played a greater role in the First World War than initially given credit, forcing the British government over time to develop a competent ‗Home Defence‘ system to ward off German bombings and satisfy the British public‘s pressure for protection. By juxtaposing early aerial history with the British public‘s perceptions and the government‘s response, this study reveals a vital transition in the nature and perceptions of warfare during the First World War, providing a socio-military perspective rarely seen in pure military or social histories. Debunking the misconception of the reliance of aerial warfare for just scouting and reconnaissance, this study demonstrates that aerial bombardment, focusing particularly on the German bombing campaign over Britain, had a significant psychological impact on the British people. Moreover, studying these bombings illustrates the rapid technological and tactical advancements that transpired as the war progressed, eventually leading to the creation of the ‗infant‘ British Royal Air Force and an aerial defense system that would become the foundation of Britain‘s defense system during World War II. The enduring results of these German bombings was Britain‘s reunion with the European continent – no longer allowing it to remain in isolation – while simultaneously contributing to the general ‗totalization‘ of warfare that occurred in the First World War.
    • Test-teach-test procedure in general science

      Hensley, R.W. (2013-01-22)
      Not available.
    • The Achievements of the American Negro in the Present Era

      Churchill, Coleridge M. (2013-01-08)
      Not Available
    • The anxiety of learning disabled school children with remedial instruction

      Coronado V, Marco A (2012-05-16)
      The purpose of the present study was to investigate the anxiety levels of elementary school learning disabled(LD)students provided with atleast one semester of remedial instruction.It was hypothesized that there would be a significant difference in anxiety levels between LD and regular education(RE) students.The variables were anxiety,grade level,and gender for the LD and RE students.A sample of 90 students from 3rd,4th and 5th grades were divided into the LD and RE groups.Students in the LD group had been provided with remedial instruction ranging from one to seven semesters with an average of three semesters.The student's anxiety was self-reported on the RCMAS.The LD and RE sets of scores were analyzed using a 3-way analysis of variance with the level of significance set at p < .05.The results indicate that,compared to non-LD,the LD students displayed significantly higher levels of general anxiety,worry,oversensitivity,social concerns,and concentrations difficulties.LD females displayed significantly higher levels of general anxiety,worry,and oversensitivity than LD male students.In addition,LD 5th grade females showed significantly higher levels of anxiety than LD 3rd and 4th grade male and female students.Moreover,LD and RE lower grade students did lie significantly more than upper grade students.