Now showing items 1-20 of 61

    • DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING IN INTERNET OF THINGS (IoT) USING MOBILE AD HOC NETWORK (MANET): A SWARM INTELLIGENCE BASED APPROACH

      SELVADURAI, JOHN (Cunningham Memorial Library, Terre Haute, Indiana State University., 2017-12)
      Internet of Things (IoT) is a fast-growing technological trend, which is expected to revolutionize the world by changing the way we do things. IoT is a concept that encourages all the electronic devices to connect to the internet and interact with each other. By connecting all these devices to the internet, new markets can be created, productivity can be improved, operating costs can be reduced and many other benefits can be obtained. In IoT architecture, often sensors and aggregators collect data and send to a cloud server for analyzing via the traditional cloud-server model. This client-server architecture is not adequate to fulfill the growing requirements of IoT applications because this model is subjected to cloud latency. This research proposed a distributed computing model called Distributed Shared Optimization (DSO) to eliminate the delay caused by cloud latency. DSO is based on swarm intelligence where algorithms are built by modeling the behaviors of biological agents such as bees, ants, and birds. Mobile Ad-hoc Network (MANET) is used as the platform to build distributed computing. The infrastructure-less and leader-less features of MANET make it the ideal candidate to build IoT with swarm intelligence. To test the theory, this research also built a simulation program and conducted multiple simulations on both DSO and client-server models. The simulation data was analyzed by descriptive statistics and One-Way ANOVA. This research found that there is a significant difference in computing time between DSO and client-server models. Further, Multiple-Regression technique was conducted on DSO simulation data to identify the effect sensors and data had towards DSO computing time.
    • THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CONCURRENT DESIGN ON THE COST AND SCHEDULE PERFORMANCE OF DEFENSE WEAPONS SYSTEM ACQUISITIONS

      Robertson, Randolph B. (Cunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State University, 2017-12)
      This study investigates the impact of concurrent design on the cost growth and schedule growth of US Department of Defense Major Defense Acquisition Systems (MDAPs). It is motivated by the question of whether employment of concurrent design in the development of a major weapon system will produce better results in terms of cost and schedule than traditional serial development methods. Selected Acquisition Reports were used to determine the cost and schedule growth of MDAPs as well as the degree of concurrency employed. Two simple linear regression analyses were used to determine the degree to which cost growth and schedule growth vary with concurrency. The results were somewhat surprising in that for major weapon systems the utilization of concurrency as it was implemented in the programs under study was shown to have no effect on cost performance, and that performance to development schedule, one of the purported benefits of concurrency, was actually shown to deteriorate with increases in concurrency. These results, while not an indictment of the concept of concurrency, indicate that better practices and methods are needed in the implementation of concurrency in major weapon systems. The findings are instructive to stakeholders in the weapons acquisition process in their consideration of whether and how to employ concurrent design strategies in their planning of new weapons acquisition programs.
    • A STUDY OF THE FACTORS INFLUENCING LAST MILE RESIDENTIAL FIXED BROADBAND PRICING IN KENTUCKY

      Ramage, Michael (Cunningham Memorial Library, Terre Haute, Indiana State University., 2017-12)
      Ever since the first telegraph, a technology management challenge has existed to expand the availability of communication services farther into rural and unserved areas, while maintaining the affordability of those services to residential users. Over the years, that challenge has transformed from telegraph to broadband communications or high-speed Internet access. The challenge of affordable expansion of broadband services is seen all across the United States including the Commonwealth of Kentucky. This study examined the extent to which community and provider-related supply and demand factors among last mile residential fixed broadband service areas impact the nonpromotional advertised price of last mile broadband service throughout the 120 counties in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The potential factors included population density, unemployment rate, provider count, broadband availability, middle mile, actual broadband speeds, technology deployed, provider type, maximum advertised download speeds, and maximum advertised upload speeds, with a goal to reveal if any have a correlation to the actual price of broadband seen by end users. In addition, this study attempted to create a model based on the significantly correlated factors. Utilizing Pearson correlation and multiple regression analysis, this study found five variables with a significant correlation to the dependent variable, price per megabit, including a slight negative correlation with the count of middle mile providers, slight positive correlation with the technology deployed, slight negative correlation with the provider type, strong negative v correlation with the download speed tier, and strong negative correlation with the upload speed tier. Finally, a model was created to predict the price per megabit of broadband with three variables, technology used, provider type, and a joint variable representing the download and upload speeds tiers.
    • DEVELOPMENT OF A QUALITY MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT TOOL TO EVALUATE SOFTWARE USING SOFTWARE QUALITY MANAGEMENT BEST PRACTICES

      Erukulapati, Kishore (Cunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State University, 2017-12)
      Organizations are constantly in search of competitive advantages in today’s complex global marketplace through improvement of quality, better affordability, and quicker delivery of products and services. This is significantly true for software as a product and service. With other things being equal, the quality of software will impact consumers, organizations, and nations. The quality and efficiency of the process utilized to create and deploy software can result in cost and schedule overruns, cancelled projects, loss of revenue, loss of market share, and loss of consumer confidence. Hence, it behooves us to constantly explore quality management strategies to deliver high quality software quickly at an affordable price. This research identifies software quality management best practices derived from scholarly literature using bibliometric techniques in conjunction with literature review, synthesizes these best practices into an assessment tool for industrial practitioners, refines the assessment tool based on academic expert review, further refines the assessment tool based on a pilot test with industry experts, and undertakes industry expert validation. Key elements of this software quality assessment tool include issues dealing with people, organizational environment, process, and technology best practices. Additionally, weights were assigned to issues of people, organizational environment, process, and technology best practices based on their relative importance, to calculate an overall weighted score for organizations to evaluate where they stand with respect to their peers in pursuing the business of producing quality software. This research study indicates that people best practices carry 40% of overall weight, organizational best v practices carry 30% of overall weight, process best practices carry 15% of overall weight, and technology best practices carry 15% of overall weight. The assessment tool that is developed will be valuable to organizations that seek to take advantage of rapid innovations in pursuing higher software quality. These organizations can use the assessment tool for implementing best practices based on the latest cutting edge management strategies that can lead to improved software quality and other competitive advantages in the global marketplace. This research contributed to the current academic literature in software quality by presenting a quality assessment tool based on software quality management best practices, contributed to the body of knowledge on software quality management, and expanded the knowledgebase on quality management practices. This research also contributed to current professional practice by incorporating software quality management best practices into a quality management assessment tool to evaluate software.
    • A STUDY OF THE MATERIAL INSPECTION RECORD AND QUALITY SYSTEMS: A CASE IN THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY

      Brown, Larry W. Jr. (Cunningham Memorial Library, Terre Haute, Indiana State University., 2017-12)
      Defective products and services are a part of every industry, sector, and organization. Minimization of those defects is essential for business success. The later those defects are found, the more they cost the business and consumer. This study investigated the impact having an accredited Quality Management System (QMS) had on the acceptance of delivered product. The study focused on the products delivered to the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) and Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) organizations. This study investigated the statistical significance between the means of the groups within size and number of accreditation. The dependent variables were Material Inspection Record (MIR), units received, and units rejected, or products delivered to the NAVSEA and NAVSUP organizations. The study used the PDREP Metric Dashboard data for fiscal year 2012, quarter 1 through fiscal year 2016, quarter 2, resulting in more than 8,000 records analyzed and interpreted using a one-way ANOVA and General Linear Model. The results of the analysis indicated there were no significant differences between size or accreditation of organizations, when compared to the number of rejected units and Material Inspection Report (MIR) acceptance or rejection. The analysis did suggest there is statistical significance when size and accreditation are compared to MIR acceptance or rejection (F-Value 3.01, P-Value 0.006). Additional analysis was conducted for within group comparisons and small organizations were identified as having a statistically disproportionate percentage of units rejected (76.61 percent), when compared to the percentage of units received (55.24 percent). iv Within small organizations, organizations with one accreditation had the highest ratio of units rejected compared to units received (2.00 to 1) as a percentage of units received within small organizations. Further research was recommended to explore other factors that would improve risk assessment and mitigation within the Department of Defense (DoD).
    • OPERATIONALIZING HUMILITY: A MODEL OF SITUATIONAL HUMILITY FOR CHRISTIAN COLLEGE STUDENT LEADERS

      Barrett, Scott T. (Cunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State University, 2017-12)
      This research study explored how college student leaders operationalize humility in their actions and what leads individuals to act with situational humility. There is a rise in narcissistic tendencies in college students (Twenge, Konrath, Campbell, & Bushman, 2008a, 2008b) and a decline in overall character traits (Burns, 2012; Hunter, 2000; Liddell & Cooper, 2012). Opposite the vice of narcissism sits the virtue of humility (Emmons, 2000; Exline & Geyer, 2004; Peterson & Seligman, 2004; Tangney, 2000). Using a grounded theory approach, the researcher looked to discover the process of humility development. Twenty six in depth interviews were conducted at three institutions. Each institution was a member of the Council of Christian Colleges and Universities and each participant identified as having a Christian belief system. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed. Transcriptions were coded using grounded theory method of open, axial, and selective coding. Based on the data collected three main themes emerged. Faith and humility go hand in hand, sense of self impacts humbling experiences, and the effect of relationships on humility. Through this research, the model of situational humility emerged grounded in the data. The model of situational humility describes what leads an individual to act with humility within a specific humbling experience. For these students, humbling experiences occurred when their sense of self (“I am an athlete,” “I get things done on time,” “I am a not racist”) did not line of up with their experience of the world (physical injury, failing to send necessary emails, making comments that were received as racial insensitive by a peer). Individuals then move to iv the point of change where they must decide how whether they will reorient their sense of self or actions or if they will not reorient and act with pride. In this point of change individuals were positively impacted towards humility by their Christian belief system, empathy, being in relationship, and interacting with others who were different from them. The implications of this research for institutional leaders who desire to grow humility in students include valuing how humility is seen as a virtue, growing empathy in students, and providing opportunities for students to be in relationship with others, specifically those who are different from them.
    • Incorporating Lean Non-Value Added Variants into a Method of Determining Stakeholder Salience for First-Line Manager Decision Making

      Bader, Bruce H. (Cunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State University, 2017-12)
      This research brings together two streams of thought for first-line manager decisionmaking. The first is the quality system model, in particular, Lean operations. The second is Stakeholder Theory. Both streams have been identified as ways to improve value of the organization. Previous studies disagree regarding whether Lean and Stakeholder theory can work together. The potential problem of having a poor balance of Stakeholders and Lean waste is that exclusive focus on one may result in less awareness of the other, in which case value can be lost by the organization. This research investigates if both Lean waste and Stakeholder salience share a common language in the literature using data mining. This research surveys organizations that perceive themselves as Lean and have multiple diverse Stakeholders to determine whether Lean wastes and Stakeholder salience (priority) are considered the decision-making process. A Z-test compares proportions of Lean waste considered to proportions of Stakeholder salience. An ANOVA is done to see if organization type, position of a person within the organization, organization size, geographic location, or lean management maturity has an effect on the priority assigned to Stakeholder salience or Lean waste variants when making decisions. The final phase of this research is a proposed decision-making instrument that will weigh Stakeholder salience and Lean waste variants on an equitable level for First-line Managers’ decision-making. The major findings of this research are that Lean waste variants and Stakeholder salience are considered in decision-making but that Stakeholder salience is more important. This is iv independent of various factors. Stakeholder mapping using salience values adjusted for Lean waste provides a visually enhanced balanced approach allowing the decision-makers to know the impact of both, facilitating more precise input to their decision-making process. More precision in the decision-making process can lead to results that create improved value for the organization.
    • WHAT IS THE INFLUENCE OF FORM-FOCUSED INSTRUCTION OF COPULA AND AUXILIARY (BE) ON ESL LEARNERS?

      Alraddadi, Abdulaziz Ibrahim (Cunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State University, 2017-12)
      This study explored the influence of form-focused instruction (FFI) in teaching English copula and auxiliary (be) to English as a second language (ESL) learners. Following the noticing hypothesis, FFI, and the basic principles of curriculum and instruction theory, this study investigates if ESL learners make omission, misuse, or misjudgment errors while acquiring English as a second language. Also, the study examined whether ESL learners show significant improvement in their knowledge of English copula and auxiliary (be) after receiving FFI. Previous copula and auxiliary (be) research (Jishvithaa, Tabitha, & Kalajahi, 2013; Muftah & Eng, 2011; Unlu & Hatipoglu, 2012) has shown that ESL learners commit omission and misuse errors. It was the aim of this study to investigate that ESL learners commit those errors and to add misjudgment errors to the investigation. Moreover, the study also aimed at examining the influence of FFI on the ESL learners’ knowledge of copula and auxiliary (be). Previous research on FFI influence (Ellis, 1984; Tomita & Spada, 2013; Valeo, 2013) has shown a positive influence of FFI on learning and acquiring grammatical structures. This study adds more findings by focusing on the influence of FFI on the ESL learners’ knowledge of the copula and auxiliary (be) in the present tense. This study was a quantitative quasi-experimental one. It utilized a control group and an experimental group. It followed a pretest-treatment-posttest, control-group design. Participants were 14 ESL learners (10 in experimental group, 4 in control group) who were in two existing groups at two ESL classes in a Midwestern university. The results reflect that participants made v omission, misuse, and misjudgment errors. The participants committed more misjudgment errors and less omission and misuse errors. All participants showed a significant change overtime in regard to making misjudgment errors. The outcomes highlight misjudgment errors as a potential type of errors that ESL learners may commit with copula and auxiliary (be). The experimental group outperformed the control group over time by significantly making less omission errors. When compared over time and between groups, participants’ scores on the grammatical judgment tasks have shown improvement suggesting a positive effect of FFI treatment on the participants’ knowledge of copula and auxiliary (be). Further research is needed to involve a larger participant population and more types of copula and auxiliary (be) errors.
    • KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS OF PART-TIME EMPLOYEES TEACHING ONLINE

      Alexander, Mark L. (Cunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State University, 2017-12)
      Online learning has caused a seismic shift in higher education since its rise beginning at the turn of the century. A portion of that impact has been on the ascent of the part-time employee teaching online. Adjunct instructors account for the overwhelming majority of the faculty providing education to these online learners. Because an instructor’s performance impacts students’ learning and their resulting end of course evaluation has such a bearing upon that person’s employment, it is imperative to identify key performance indicators (KPIs) of employees teaching online. The problem addressed by this study was to determine the factors that affected a part-time online employee’s performance rating by their students within a higher education setting. More specifically, this study sought to identify key performance indicators for those teaching online part-time. Correlations and regression were conducted on institutional data covering 1295 fully online courses that occurred in 2016 at a regionally-accredited, private university. Potential key performance indicators studied were faculty threads posted per week, faculty employment longevity, faculty load, average course GPA, and class size. Three of those variables were statistically significant (p < 0.001) in individual correlations to an adjunct’s End of Course Survey score. Four of those factors were statistically significant (p < 0.001) in predicting students’ satisfaction of a part-time employee teaching online. The key performance indicators of part-time employees teaching online include faculty threads posted per week, faculty load, average course GPA, and class size. Implications and ideas for future research were discussed. iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS An undertaking such as this has one person as its author but many people that contribute to such a culminating project. Thank you to my Advisor and Chair, Dr. Cindy Crowder, for her encouragement, guidance, and status check-ins. Thanks also to my committee members, Dr. David Beach and Dr. Li-Shiang Tsay, for their time, review, and feedback throughout this process. My family has been gracious, encouraging, and supportive throughout this entire process. Louann, your love and support is epitomized in your willingness to read this document and cheer me on through the defense. Thank you for encouraging my pursuit of certifications and degrees throughout our marriage. You make me a better person each and every day. Thanks to Emily, Abigail, Ian, and Isaiah for supporting me through this journey, for extending your support, and for forgiving me for being grumpy near deadlines. I am so blessed to be your father. You all inspire me! Thanks to my parents, in-laws, extended family members, small group members, friends, and colleagues at work for your support and belief in me. You are each such a blessing. I must give a shout-out to all of the locations that fueled my need for public solitude: The Refinery Business Center, Ott Hall 150-B and the Student Center at Indiana Wesleyan University, and Culver’s Restaurant #404. Thank you for tolerating me! Most importantly, thanks to my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. To God be the Glory, great things He has done!
    • The Differences in Perceived Acceptance of A Modified Advanced Product Quality Planning (Apqp) Model for Health Care

      Schneider, Richard A.
      The health care industry has been slow to embrace traditional systems engineering tools, which have proven effective in manufacturing and other industries in developing services and delivery systems. There is a perception that these traditional engineering tools, methods, and processes are not applicable to health care. A Delphi panel of 14 experts gathered to identify which Advanced Product Quality Planning (APQP) tools are applicable in health care. Secondly, this study aimed to reach consensus on additional tools that if added, would make the APQP model more likely to meet the needs of the health care industry. The resultant of the Delphi exercise is the Advanced Quality Planning for Health Care (AQPH) model. The Delphi panel of experts consented on 48 tools. An Internet survey sent to the American Society for Quality Health Care Division (ASQ-HCD) collected data on the differences in perceived acceptance of the AQPH model. One hundred and thirty-eight ASQHCD members completed the Internet survey. A T-Test measured differences in perceived acceptance amongst the groups. There was no statistically significant difference (p=.530, ∞=.05) in perception of the AQPH model between ASQ-HCD certified members and non-certified members. There also was no statistically significant difference (p=.758, ∞=.05) in perception of the AQPH model between ASQ-HCD members holding clinical and non-clinical positions. Additionally, there was no statistically significant difference ( p=.416, ∞=.05) in perception of the AQPH model between ASQ-HCD members with less than 20 years of experience and members with 20 years or more experience.the AQPH model between ASQ-HCD members with less than 20 years of experience and members with 20 years or more experience.
    • Post-Arrival Performance Interventions That Assist Expatriates’ Adjustment and Performance

      Wood, Evan D.
      This research examined the relationship between post-arrival performance interventions and the adjustment and performance of North American expatriates working and living in Hong Kong. The focus was on an integrated view of multiple post-arrival performance interventions in order to examine their combined impact. This research provides information to organizations regarding strategies to improve the adjustment and performance of expatriates. A multivariate design was used to describe the dynamics underlying the dimensions of adjustment and performance by indicating which interventions in combination might be more strongly associated with adjustment and performance. A questionnaire comprised of several existing constructs derived from the extant literature was developed and administered to those listed in the 2009/2010 American Chamber of Commerce Hong Kong membership directory. The interventions examined were integrated cross-cultural training, mentoring, role ambiguity, spouse and family support, and compensation. Four different multiple regression models were developed. The final general adjustment regression model showed a relationship with spouse and family support and role ambiguity. The final interaction adjustment regression model showed a relationship with role ambiguity, spouse and family support, compensation, and the control variable language fluency. The final work adjustment regression model showed a relationship with integrated cross-cultural training, mentoring, role ambiguity, spouse and family support, and compensation. Lastly, the final performance regression model showed a relationship with integrated cross-cultural training, mentoring, role ambiguity, spouse and family support, compensation, and language fluency. The results suggest the importance of multi-national corporations to consider post-arrival performance interventions in addition to pre-departure interventions. Specifically, two primary areas emerged with high significance. First, reducing role ambiguity has a significant relationship with all three adjustment constructs and performance. Second, the findings lend support to the concept of organizations providing additional support to the spouse and family as a means of increasing adjustment and performance of expatriates.
    • Effectiveness of Information Technology Infrastructure Library Process Implementations by Information Technology Departments within United States Organizations

      Persinger, Jon F.
      This research study examined whether the overall effectiveness of the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) could be predicted by measuring multiple independent variables. The primary variables studied included the number of ITIL process modules adopted and the overall ITIL ―maturity level. An online survey was used to collect data from participating volunteers within the United States, and then analyzed to reveal any significant findings. The research showed a statistically significant positive relationship between overall maturity level and effectiveness, however the ability to predict effectiveness based upon the number of process modules adopted was inconclusive. Additionally, differences in module adoption from either the Service Support or Service Delivery process blocks were considered. The results suggested that process module adoption from the Service Support block has a somewhat stronger relationship to overall effectiveness than adoption from the Service Delivery block, though this finding should be viewed cautiously. Sample size and survey instrument limitations restricted the interpretation of the results.
    • Comparing the Perceived Relevance of Informal and Formal Learning in Skill Acquisition in a Leadership Development Program

      Smith, William Kirk
      Leadership development is at or near the top in importance to senior executives within organizations. In the criteria for the Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award, leadership has the second highest weighting, behind only business results but ahead of customer focus, measurement, analysis, knowledge management, workforce focus, process management, and strategic planning. Corporations in the United States spend an estimated $20-30 billion per year in leadership training and there is a question of whether the learning that takes place outside the classroom, informal learning, is more relevant than formal learning. Learning within organizations is vital to success. It is the lifeblood that grows and sustains human capital. Many methods for the measurement and evaluation of the impact of formal learning and performance improvement programs in organizations have been introduced in the past decade but measuring and evaluating the value of informal learning that filters through patterns of relationships in organizational networks has been elusive. Very few studies have attempted to address the effects of informal and formal learning in management or leadership training. The objective of this study was to compare the perceived relevance of informal learning and formal learning in acquiring leadership skills in a leadership development program. This study attempted to compare the perceived relevance of informal learning versus formal learning in skill acquisition in a specific leadership development program. This was done using data from McKesson Corporation‘s McKesson Center for Learning Lead the Way program. This study provides insights into the perceived relative importance and relevance of informal and formal learning. Using paired-samples t-tests, the study analyzed the perceived relevance and importance in a leadership development program.
    • A Study of Selection, Training, and Host Country Cultural Adaptation Experiences of Expatriate Faculty from United States AASCU Universities

      Fenton, Mark Gabriel
      Literature addressing selection, cross-cultural training and determinants of a successful or failed expatriate experience is extensive for those in business, but there is little research on these topics for professional academics. This research expands the understanding of why academics expatriate, how they were selected, what their perceptions of a successful experience are, what pre-departure cultural training they received, and what factors may have been difficult. Expatriates are professionals who live and work in a foreign country. This status study of male and female faculty from two AASCU universities expands knowledge on academic expatriation. The response rate was 54%. Independent sample t-tests were used to analyze data with gender as the grouping variable. There was no institutional requirement for expatriation, but it is encouraged. Reasons for expatriation were the experience, conduct research and teach. Business and academia look to expand internationally. While academia seeks to attract a more diverse student and faculty base, business may be seeking quicker access to raw materials, labor and markets. Traveling spouses had fewer difficulties adapting to a host culture than children. Few academics received cross cultural training. It is recommended a formal selection instrument be designed specifically for academics. Training programs should include cultural differences, cultural adaptation, and professional expectations. Additional study of success and failure factors such as living conditions, host cultures and formal training is recommended. As universities continue to grow faculty and student exchange programs, training needs to grow in ways to support expatriation, cultural understanding and the goal of a successful expatriate experience.
    • Tasks And Responsibilities of a First-Line Supervisor in a Job Shop Manufacturing Environment in Northwest Wisconsin

      Pederson, Leonard
      The problem of this study was to identity the tasks and responsibilities of first-line supervisors in a job-shop manufacturing environment in the Northwest Wisconsin portion of the United States. The purpose of this study was to provide insight to the knowledge, skills, and abilities required of the first-line supervisors in a manufacturing environment. An understanding of these attributes would aid in the future selection of supervisory candidates, and it would assist corporate executives in the training and evaluation of personnel in supervisory positions. The methodology of this research study used a modified Delphi study process, in that it went from the literature review to the development of the tasks and responsibilities from the review of the prior research. The study was executed in four sequential phases, which at its conclusion provided a list of tasks and responsibilities. The first phase was a thorough literature review of work that had already been completed regarding managerial and supervisory tasks and responsibilities. The second phase was the pilot study and the enlistment of the panel members. The third phase was the actual Delphi process using the assembled panel, using the Internet and email to communicate. The fourth phase was the analysis and reporting of the results of the Delphi panel. The result was a list of 49 tasks. The panel estimated the time spent during their work week on each task, which accounted for 94.2% of their time. Using a Pareto concept of looking at the top 20% or top 10 items for guidance, seven of the top 10 are related to interpersonal communication and skills. These tasks only consumed 21% of their time, but constituted seven of the top 10 most important tasks as viewed by the panel.
    • Sustainability Considerations in Defense Aircraft Manufacturing

      Cunion, Jeffrey
      Limited availability of non-renewable resources, global warming, competitive advantage, increased government regulation, compliance and non-compliance costs, public concern, and social responsibility are all general reasons why organizations have recently embarked on campaigns to adopt sustainable, or “green”, practices as a business strategy. Though much of the current research documents the reasons for organizations to pursue sustainable methods, the literature lacks industry specific information on how organizations can, and actually are, making their operations more sustainable. This dissertation describes the sustainable practices and considerations prescribed for all manufacturing industries by means of an extensive literature review. In addition, a case study of sustainable aircraft manufacturing materials and processes in place at a particular aircraft manufacturer was performed via a review of company documentation, interviews, and process observations. The sustainable techniques identified during the course of this research have been compiled into listings which can be utilized by aircraft manufacturers and supply chain members for assessing the sustainability of their own organizations.
    • A Comparison of Gauge Repeatability and Reproducibility Methods

      Stamm, Scott
      Common in industrial applications is the need for estimates for measurement precision error. Measurement precision error is important because manufacturers make decisions about product acceptance or rejection based on product measurements. A frequent method of determining measurement precision error is the Gauge Repeatability and Reproducibility Study (GR&R Study). A typical GR&R Study determines estimates of repeatability error, reproducibility error as well as estimates of total measurement precision error and the part-topart component. This dissertation compares three methods of performing GR&R studies on 10,080 simulated GR&R study data sets. The 10,080 simulations were derivations of 224 actual Gauge R&R studies. The three methods of analysis are Donald Wheeler’s “Honest Gauge R&R Study,” the Automotive Industry Action Group’s Average and Range Method and the ANOVA Method. The study results were analyzed by ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and Pearson correlation. The analysis showed the three methods are different in their estimates of total Gauge R&R and the components of repeatability, reproducibility, and part-to-part. The analysis also estimated the pair-wise comparisons of the three methods and showed they are different from one another for total GR&R, repeatability, reproducibility and part-to-part. The correlation analysis showed Donald Wheeler’s method to be correlated with both the Average and range method and the ANOVA method and the Average and range method to be correlated to the ANOVA method. For critical products the ANOVA method is recommended for Gauge R&R analysis, while for less critical products the Average and range method and Wheeler’s “Honest Gauge R&R Study” approach are recommended.
    • Identifying Innovative Work Behaviors: An Inquiry Using Critical Incident Technique

      Peffers, Samuel N.
      Innovation is a driving force in economic activity and often considered essential for organizational health and growth; therefore, a better understanding of the employee behaviors that supervisors most frequently associate with employee innovativeness, innovative work behaviors, has the potential to be very beneficial. Although much has been written about it, most previous work has focused on behavior categories or dimensions without seeking to observe or understand how innovative work behavior is manifested in the workplace. Critical incident technique is a well-established and extensively applied method of inquiry for determining effective work role behaviors, but it has not previously been applied well to the study of innovative work behavior. This study applied critical incident technique to collect first hand behavior observations in the places where innovative work behavior occurs. A better understanding of the discrete behaviors associated with workplace innovation can assist Human Resources Development practitioners and educators in administering innovation focused training and development initiatives. The research presented in this dissertation indicates that what supervisors within organizations with a stated innovation orientation perceive as effective innovative work behavior can be summarized as four primary behaviors: generating ideas, recognizing problems or opportunities, acquiring ideas from sources external to the employee’s immediate work organization, and promoting ideas to others within the work organization.
    • An Experiment to Assess the Utilization of Adaptive Control Technology on a Cnc Lathe to Reduce Energy Consumption During Machining: A Step Towards Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing

      Bartles, Dean L.
      Global warming is a well-documented concern. If left unabated, many scientists believe that global warming could potentially have devastating impacts to life on earth. Current research points to greenhouse gas emissions caused by the burning of fossil fuels to produce electricity as one of the primary causes of global warming. The more electricity produced and consumed the more greenhouse gas emissions are released to the atmosphere. Industry is one of the most significant consumers of electricity. Within industry, manufacturing accounts for a significant majority of all energy consumed with machine tools being one of the largest consumers. Machine tool builders need to develop ways for machine tools to use less energy in producing the same amount of product. The literature contains suggestions on how a manufacturer can approach reducing the amount of energy consumed by machine tools in manufacturing. However, there is paucity in the literature related to how “adaptive control” might be employed to reduce the amount of energy consumed by machine tools in manufacturing. This study examined the possibility of employing “adaptive control” to minimize the amount of energy consumed by machine tools during machining.
    • Impact of ISO 9001 Certification on United States Firms’ Financial Performance

      Aba, Eli Kofi
      One of the greatest demands in our global economy that have compelled firms to invest increasingly in resources for the enhancement of their management practices is organizational competitiveness. Standards have played an increasingly important role in economic and market globalization. Studies on the financial impact of ISO 9001 on firms are still inadequate to make definitive conclusions on the financial impact of ISO 9001 on firms. Furthermore, there is no clear position on the financial benefits of ISO 9001 standard in literature. Therefore, the researcher investigated the impact of ISO 9001 certification on United States firms’ financial performance for a period of five years including one-year prior to certification, year of certification, and three fiscal years after certification. A sample of 397 firms that had received ISO 9001 certification from 1991 to 2002 was examined. Certified-firm and non-certified-firm operating performances were examined over the same period based on the ratio of pre-tax operating income to total assets (EBITA/TA). Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to test for significant differences in operating performance between the firms. There was significant improvement performance from prior year to year of certification. The certified firms performed better in the five-year period than the non-certified and the matched-control firms.