• Global-Mindedness and Intercultural Competence: A Quantitative Study of Pre-Service Teachers

      Cui, Qi (2013-08-28)
      This study assessed pre-service teachers’ levels of global-mindedness and intercultural competence using the Global-Mindedness Scale (GMS) and the Cultural Intelligence Scale (CQS) and investigated the correlation between the two. The study examined whether the individual scale factors such as gender, perceived competence in non-native language or culture, frequency of interaction with people of diverse backgrounds, and teaching experience were good predictors of pre-service teachers’ global-mindedness and intercultural competence. The survey was conducted through Qualtrics with privacy protection. The Statistical Package of the Social Science (SPSS) was used and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), multiple regression, and Pearson product-moment correlation tests were utilized to analyze the data. The research results were based on 184 survey responses of undergraduate students who have declared an education major or minor at a Midwest state university. The results revealed that the independent variables of gender, perceived competence in non-native language or culture, and teaching experience were significant predictors of the pre-service teachers’ levels of global-mindedness. The independent variables of perceived competence in non-native language or culture, frequency of interaction with people of diverse backgrounds, and teaching experience were significant predictors of pre-service teachers’ levels of intercultural competence. There was a moderate, positive, and significant correlation between pre-service teachers’ overall GMS scores and overall CQS scores.
    • How do Principals' Behaviors Facilitate or Inhibit the Development of a Culturally Relevant Learning Community?

      Kelley, Gwendolyn Julia
      The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the question: “How do principals facilitate or inhibit the development of a culturally responsive learning environment?” A second question asked, “What is the principal’s role in developing a culturally relevant learning community?” The criteria for purposely selecting the 12 principals chosen for the study included finding principals who served in schools with a 50% or greater non-White population and who also had served a minimum of three years as the school’s leader at the time of the study. Additionally, the schools chosen from various districts around the state showed an upward trend in student performance and growth model data for all of their ethnic groups. Based on a literature review, which provided a cursory view of topics related to understanding cultural competency, questions were formulated that explored what creating a culturally responsive learning community looked like. The interviews revealed many practices that described effective schools and what effective principals do. Five themes emerged in the findings. Linked to each of the findings is a range of five to 11 subthemes. With varying degrees of understanding and implementation, principals in the study demonstrated practices that included (a) having high expectations for all, (b) developing a sense of community, (c) using analysis of data and monitoring/evaluation of staff, (d) providing professional development that addressed cultural competency issues, and (e) promoting awareness and knowledge about cultural proficiency practices. Noting their current progress, all of the principals expressed their desire for their staffs to have more training to increase their levels of cultural proficiency.