• A problem book for prospective superintendents

      Hanna, Paul Mitchell
      Not Available.
    • An Analysis of the Financial Aid and Political Consequences experienced by School corporations when closing a School or Consolidating Schools

      Morikis, Peter
      The purpose of this study was to identify the common consequences experienced by school corporations when closing or consolidating schools. The primary focus of the study was to identify the financial and political consequences experienced by school corporations when closing a school closing or consolidating schools. Specific questions regarding district facilities, district personnel, district expenditures, and district educational programs were asked. Four superintendents for this study were selected from a sampling of Indiana school corporations who had experienced declining enrollments and a school closure or consolidation. Once identified, superintendents were interviewed to determine the financial and political consequences experienced when closing a school or consolidating schools. After a review of the literature and obtaining the perspective of superintendents through interviews, the researcher was able to discover many common themes school corporations faced when closing or consolidating schools. Those themes can be found in the following statements: 1. There was community conflict that was generated when a neighborhood school closed. 2. Teacher associations were very protective of positions and were hesitant to agree to staff reductions. 3. The financial condition of the district was a strong consideration when contemplating a school closing or consolidation. 4. Administrative staff reductions were an integral part of working through the school closure or consolidation process. 5. Board members were reluctant to move ahead with a school closure or consolidation. 6. Non-certified personnel positions were eliminated during the closure or consolidation process. The literature review and accompanying interviews also helped answer the Grand Tour questions that prompted this research study. The answers to the Grand Tour questions follow: 1. There are significant financial and political consequences when closing a school or consolidating schools. 2. There are significant financial and political consequences to school districts when closing or consolidating schools. 3. There are significant consequences to district facilities, district personnel, and district expenditures when closing or consolidating schools. 4. There are few consequences to programs when closing or consolidating schools. The results presented above demonstrated consequences school corporations experienced when closing a school or consolidating schools.
    • Educational Referendum Voting in Ohio Based on District Size, Socio-Economic Status, and Median Income

      Galovic IV, Thomas A.
      The purpose of this study was to identify the successful tax levy votes for capital project referendums in Ohio over the past 17 elections and correlate those with the socio-economic level, median income, and district enrollment in which the votes took place. This will serve as a guide to predict what school districts in Indiana would have successful capital project referendum votes based on the Ohio results. The study used data provided directly from the Ohio Department of Education in regards to the levy votes and the poverty level of the school districts over the past 17 elections from school years spanning 2004-2009. Once data were compiled, a threshold was developed of the frequency of success rates of the votes relative to poverty level, median income, and enrollment.
    • The need for sex education in the public schools

      Flick, E. Perry (2012-08-14)
      Not Available.
    • The Superintendent‘s Role In Developing Peer Coaching

      Younghans, Barry C.
      The purpose of this qualitative study was to discover how the behaviors of Indiana School district-level leaders create a culture of instructional, peer coaching in the district. An additional purpose was to discover any similarities between how district level leaders and leaders from different sized corporations behaved to create a climate of peer coaching. The increase in accountability brought about by both federal and state legislation has placed greater emphasis on providing each classroom with highly-trained instructors. One method of professional development that is currently being used to help ensure that students have access to excellent teachers is peer coaching; also known as instructional coaching. The related literature reviewed included the areas of peer coaching benefits, the characteristics of peer coaching and the role of administrators in peer coaching. Lastly, one theoretical model of peer coaching was reviewed. The participants in the study were nine school-district leaders from across the approximate northern third of Indiana. These leaders were interviewed and some common behaviors were identified. These behaviors included involvement in the coach selection process, securing funding for coaches, providing professional development for coaches and providing coaches to elementary teachers in literacy. Insight gained from this study should help district-level leaders create a climate conducive to peer coaching.