Recent Submissions

  • EFFECT OF DIRECTED STUDY OF MATHEMATICS VOCABULARY ON STANDARDIZED MATHEMATICS ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS

    Waite, Adel Marlane (Cunningham Memorial Library, Terre Haute, Indiana State University., 2017-12)
    The problems under investigation included (a) Did a directed study of mathematics vocabulary significantly affect student performance levels on standardized mathematical questions? and (b) Did the strategies used in this study significantly affect student performance levels on standardized mathematical questions? The population consisted of eighth-grade pre-algebra students from two different middle schools in southern Indiana. This quasi-experimental study was of a quantitative, repeated-measures design, using a population of approximately 140 eighthgrade students with a control sample of 37 and an experimental sample of 52. I performed a repeated measures ANCOVA to analyze scores from a mathematics vocabulary posttest for each participant, by the treatment and control groups, while controlling for student pretests scores. Results showed that after adjusting for pretest scores (F = 20.12, p < 0.0001), students who received intervention through a directed study of mathematical vocabulary had significantly higher posttest scores compared to the group who did not receive treatment. Students in the treatment group were required to keep a vocabulary journal, part of which was a self-rating of their understanding of each term. At the conclusion of the study, I assigned journal/understanding ratings for each term in the participants’ journals. To decide if the journal/understanding scores were associated with pretest and posttest scores, I performed a Pearson’s correlation analysis using the continuous variables of journal/understanding score and pretest and posttest scores. There was no significant correlation to the pretest scores for either the student self-rating journal/understanding scores (r = -0.04, p = 0.756) nor the v journal/understanding scores that I assigned(r = -0.04, p = 0.756). The results of the correlation analysis showed that the rating of students on their own journal/understanding (r = 0.23, p = 0.103) did not have any correlation with the posttest scores; however, the rating given by the teacher on the journal/understanding of the student was positively correlated with the posttest scores (r = 0.38, p = 0.005). Higher posttest scores were associated with higher journal/understanding scores, with a moderately positive correlation. School professionals such as teachers, administrators, and curriculum directors can assess and review the intervention done in this study and explore replicating or incorporating the approach in their curriculum. With the increase in test scores due to a directed study of mathematical vocabulary, school officials may consider this approach to increase the learning of students and as a result, increase their test scores on high-stakes examinations.
  • ADULT LEARNING AND THE EFFECT OF EDUCATION AND GENDER INTERACTION ON TYPE 2 DIABETICS

    Nur, Abdi Hashi (Cunningham Memorial Library, Terre Haute, Indiana State University., 2017-12)
    The purpose of this mixed methods research study was to investigate whether the relationships between education and medication and healthy exercise adherence were the same among female and male Type 2 diabetic adult learners. The purpose included also exploring whether registered nurses would alter their approach to diabetic adult learners’ education on medication and healthy exercise adherence considering patients’ gender and education levels. The study also investigated the correlation between diabetes duration and medication and healthy exercise adherence. The research investigation employed mixed methods sequential explanatory design using qualitative data to help explain the quantitative findings. The quantitative study was based on preexisting data of 102 Type 2 diabetic adult learners collected by the researcher. The qualitative study was a phenomenological investigation based on semi-structured interviews of 10 registered nurses from Terre Haute Regional Hospital. The research investigation suggested no significant interaction between gender and education levels regarding medication and healthy exercise adherence (respectively p = .746; p = .664). In contrast, the findings in the qualitative analyses suggested that the registered nurses would change their approach to patients’ education on medication adherence based on education levels, not gender. The nurses expressed also that healthy exercise adherence among Type 2 diabetic adults was individual based, i.e., education attainment and gender had no impact on patients’ healthy exercise adherence. The quantitative analyses also suggested an inverse correlation between how long Type two diabetic adult learners have been diagnosed with the iv disease and their healthy exercise adherence. The longer patients were diabetic the less they were adherent to healthy exercise routines. The study recommended that more investigation on Type 2 diabetic adult learners would be useful to understand the impact of the interaction between gender and education attainment on medication and healthy exercise routines. The study suggested as well that future investigations should include larger sample sizes of study subjects and more representation of male Type 2 diabetic adult learners. They should as well include more representation of minority and young Type 2 diabetic populations. Moreover, this study suggested future investigations which include other groups of diabetes educators such as specialists from dietary and pharmacy professions.
  • AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE FIVE-FACTOR PERSONALITY TRAITS MODEL AS PREDICTORS AMONG WOMEN IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS FIELDS AT INDIANA STATE UNIVERSITY

    Challa, Sowmya (Cunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State University, 2017-12)
    The purpose of this study is to identify any trends in personality traits of students at a midwestern university along with the influence of gender, choice of STEM or non-STEM academic major, and level of education on personality traits. The chosen mid-western university is Indiana State University (ISU) located in Terre Haute, Indiana. This study investigated the personality traits of student’s through administering Goldberg’s (1999) International Personality Item Pool of the Big Five Broad Domains of Personality. The personality profiles of students at ISU who have taken the questionnare are summarized. The personality profiles of female students were analyzed further with special focus to identify the role of level of education and choice of major among female students. Based on the responses of the study’s subjects, there are significant relationships found between gender and all of the big five personality traits. Level of education, graduate or undergraduate, had significant impact on extraversion, agreeability, concientiousness, and emotional stability. Choice of STEM and non-STEM major impacted emotional stability for subjects in general but its influence is not significant among female subjects. Choice of STEM or non-STEM major had a significant influence on the intelligence/imagination trait for both male and female subjects. Level of education did not have any significant influence on intellegence/imagination. Overall, this study found a few significant relationships between Big-Five personality traits and identified categorizations.
  • UNDERGRADUATE MATHEMATICS STUDENTS’ ATTITUDES TOWARD USING E-LEARNING IN SAUDI ARABIA

    Alrehaili, Bakheet Wasel (2013-12)
    The main objective of this study was to investigate the attitudes of undergraduate mathematics students in Saudi Arabia towards online mathematics education. Comparisons were made among male, female, underclassmen, and upperclassmen undergraduate mathematics students at the University of Tabuk (UT). Of 161 students enrolled in the mathematics program, 118 mathematics students responded to the survey. The sample consisted of 57 male and 61 female students. A 2 x 2 ANOVA test was used to reveal any statistically significant differences between the various groups based on gender and educational level. The findings showed that underclassmen did not differ significantly from upperclassmen in their attitudes toward online mathematics, male students did not differ significantly from female students in their attitudes toward online mathematics, and there was no significant interaction between educational level and gender in terms of the students’ attitudes toward online mathematics education.
  • ADULT LEARNING AND THE EFFECT OF EDUCATION AND GENDER INTERACTION ON TYPE 2 DIABETICS

    Nur, Abdi H. (2017-12)
    The purpose of this mixed methods research study was to investigate whether the relationships between education and medication and healthy exercise adherence were the same among female and male Type 2 diabetic adult learners. The purpose included also exploring whether registered nurses would alter their approach to diabetic adult learners’ education on medication and healthy exercise adherence considering patients’ gender and education levels. The study also investigated the correlation between diabetes duration and medication and healthy exercise adherence. The research investigation employed mixed methods sequential explanatory design using qualitative data to help explain the quantitative findings. The quantitative study was based on preexisting data of 102 Type 2 diabetic adult learners collected by the researcher. The qualitative study was a phenomenological investigation based on semi-structured interviews of 10 registered nurses from Terre Haute Regional Hospital. The research investigation suggested no significant interaction between gender and education levels regarding medication and healthy exercise adherence (respectively p = .746; p = .664). In contrast, the findings in the qualitative analyses suggested that the registered nurses would change their approach to patients’ education on medication adherence based on education levels, not gender. The nurses expressed also that healthy exercise adherence among Type 2 diabetic adults was individual based, i.e., education attainment and gender had no impact on patients’ healthy exercise adherence. The quantitative analyses also suggested an inverse correlation between how long Type two diabetic adult learners have been diagnosed with the disease and their healthy exercise adherence. The longer patients were diabetic the less they were adherent to healthy exercise routines. The study recommended that more investigation on Type 2 diabetic adult learners would be useful to understand the impact of the interaction between gender and education attainment on medication and healthy exercise routines. The study suggested as well that future investigations should include larger sample sizes of study subjects and more representation of male Type 2 diabetic adult learners. They should as well include more representation of minority and young Type 2 diabetic populations. Moreover, this study suggested future investigations which include other groups of diabetes educators such as specialists from dietary and pharmacy professions.
  • Border Pedagogy and the Acculturation of Korean Students in U.S. Institutions of High Education

    Green, Randy (2010-09-22)
    This study aimed at identifying learning and teaching strategies that can promote the process of acculturation for Korean students in institutions of higher education in the United States. In particular, the study attempted to pinpoint ways in which these students and their instructors can become aware of and resist educational tendencies and approaches that promote hegemony and devalue cultural perspectives and experiences as well as construct meaning within the context of a worldview that is influenced by both Korean and U.S. cultures. It was hoped that the identification of these skills and strategies would aid both students and instructors in developing the ability to become successful border crossers, as defined by Giroux‟s (2005) border pedagogy, as well as culturally enlightened citizens of the global community. The study was qualitative in nature and consisted of a series of interviews with six South Korean students (three undergraduate and three graduate) enrolled in a mid-sized institution of higher education in the U.S. Midwest, six U.S. faculty members at the same university who had had Korean students in their courses, and four faculty members from Korea who were teaching at the university. A review of the literature included an examination of Positivism and its role in U.S. education, border pedagogy, particularly as it relates to international education and the process of acculturation, processes of cross-cultural adaptation, studies that have been conducted about South Korean students at U.S. institutions of higher education, historical influences on Korean higher education, and teaching and learning strategies common in South Korean universities. The study was able to identify several teaching and learning strategies that were interpreted as encouraging the process of acculturation and enabling students to cross borders. These strategies appeared to be supportive of the empowerment of and dialogue between students and teachers and strove to incorporate the cultural perspectives of both parties into the teaching and learning process. The study also identified a number of practices and perceptions that appeared to promote the assimilation of these students. In particular, there was little evidence that suggested the participants had reflected on or resisted influences and educational tendencies which could possibly promote the process of hegemony. The development of strategies that combat this tendency and facilitate a demystification of the educational process is recommended.
  • Foreign Language Anxiety in the Classroom and in on Online Environment

    Báez-Holley, Monica (2014-03-18)
    This study compared the levels of anxiety that students experienced when taking a foreign language in the classroom with those taking a foreign language at a distance. It also aimed to determine if the student’s academic performance in the course could be predicted by his or her foreign language anxiety level. The sample consisted of 107 undergraduate students (57 traditional classroom students and 50 online students) enrolled in SPAN 101 at Indiana State University in the spring of 2012. Participants were asked to complete the L120 Questionnaire 2 developed by Hurd (2003). The original version of the instrument was used with the online students and a modified version with the classroom students. The results of this study indicated that there was no difference in the levels of foreign language anxiety experienced between classroom and online students. It was concluded that students’ anxiety level was not a good predictor of final test scores in either environment.
  • Transformational Effects of Museum Exhibits Upon Their Patrons: The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

    Caruso-Woolard, Cassandra (2013-09-06)
    The focus of this research was on the affective learning experienced at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center—a museum that tells the history of slavery in the United States, the courage, cooperation, and perseverance enacted by many who overcame the challenges and consequences of the unfreedoms once practiced in America. Such a study is important in order to understand the challenges faced and how adversity was prevailed upon. The qualitative approach adopted in this study included focus groups, observations, artifact collection, and a review of literature. The findings from this research provide evidence that the participants in this study did experience affective learning, which led to a dialogue about societal concerns regarding racial tensions in America. Conclusions drawn from this study are the 21st century paradigm shift of how the Freedom Center advocates courage cooperation and perseverance in its mission; also, that history should be retold to understand present-day ideologies and circumstances. This study provides a solid foundation for further work investigating affective learning school-age children experience when visiting the Freedom Center. A longitudinal behavioral study to see if these children reach the fifth level of the affective domain is recommended.
  • A Comparison Study of the Use of Paper versus Digital Textbooks by Undergraduate Students

    Johnson, James W. (2013-09-05)
    Today’s undergraduate student faces many challenges. The challenges include paying for tuition and textbooks and finding a job upon graduation. These students are tech-savvy and seeking better ways to learn and retain material they learn in their classes. In addition, the textbook market is trying to evolve by serving this tech-generation through offering digital textbooks and other media-rich materials. New digital textbooks coupled with tablet e-readers are being used to help undergraduate students learn and retain information just as well as traditional paper textbooks. Undergraduate students have strong opinions about the use of paper and digital textbooks including the physical effects of digital e-readers, cost concerns for both formats of textbooks, and the features students want to see in e-readers. This study examined the effectiveness of using digital textbooks compared with traditional paper textbooks in undergraduate courses. Student performance comparisons were used to see if the digital versions have any significant influence on students’ achievement scores versus paper books and if there are any differences between genders. Moreover, regardless of performance outcomes, features of software and devices were explored to determine if these influence use of digital texts. Digital textbooks provide effective learning resources for undergraduate students at cost-effective prices. Features of digital e-readers can help students meet their learning goals and complete their coursework using new, interactive textbooks that pull together the content experts and multimedia.
  • Global-Mindedness and Intercultural Competence: A Quantitative Study of Pre-Service Teachers

    Cui, Qi (2013-08-28)
    This study assessed pre-service teachers’ levels of global-mindedness and intercultural competence using the Global-Mindedness Scale (GMS) and the Cultural Intelligence Scale (CQS) and investigated the correlation between the two. The study examined whether the individual scale factors such as gender, perceived competence in non-native language or culture, frequency of interaction with people of diverse backgrounds, and teaching experience were good predictors of pre-service teachers’ global-mindedness and intercultural competence. The survey was conducted through Qualtrics with privacy protection. The Statistical Package of the Social Science (SPSS) was used and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), multiple regression, and Pearson product-moment correlation tests were utilized to analyze the data. The research results were based on 184 survey responses of undergraduate students who have declared an education major or minor at a Midwest state university. The results revealed that the independent variables of gender, perceived competence in non-native language or culture, and teaching experience were significant predictors of the pre-service teachers’ levels of global-mindedness. The independent variables of perceived competence in non-native language or culture, frequency of interaction with people of diverse backgrounds, and teaching experience were significant predictors of pre-service teachers’ levels of intercultural competence. There was a moderate, positive, and significant correlation between pre-service teachers’ overall GMS scores and overall CQS scores.
  • An experiment with three methods of teaching social studies

    Gabbard, Darrell L. (2013-04-09)
    Not Available.
  • The preparation of a supplementary reader especially adapted for Negroes

    Merriweather, Evangeline Harris (2013-04-09)
    Not available.
  • A prognostic test for shorthand

    Huggard, Edith Hagedon (2013-04-09)
    Not available.
  • The organization and administration of a county audio-visual center

    Kuhn, Albert Joseph (2013-03-08)
    Not available.

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