• Saudi College Student's preference for synchronous and asynchronous web-based courses:An exploratory study.

      Al-Jabri, Abdullah (2012-05-17)
      Technology has become an essential component of the teaching-learning process,and online-learning,in particular,has captivated the interest of many educational institutions throughout the world.Web-based learning has provided both students and teachers with new and unique ways of communicating with each other.As a result,many studies have been conducted to investigate factors affecting the establishment of productive communications in web-based settings.Likewise,the focus of this study is how the number of courses completed and the participants perception of their English language competence impacted their preferences for synchronous and asynchronous web-based learning in English instruction and in Arabic instruction.The sample consisted of 82 Saudi undergraduate students enrolled at Indiana State University during the spring 2011.The study used a hard copy modified version of a survey that was designed by Burton(2009)containing 27 items,which were divided into three parts.A four-point Likert scale was utilized to gain an overall score of student's preferences for synchronous and asynchronous web-based courses.Descriptive statistics(frequencies,means and standard deviations,skewness and kurtosis).one-way ANOVA tests,and repeated measures test(paired samples t-test)were utilized to answer the questions presented in this study.The results revealed that there was no significant difference in student preferences for synchronous web-based courses delivered in English or Arabic on the basis of grade level or the learner's perceptions of their level of English language proficiency.There were also no significant differences between preferences for synchronous learning in English(L2)and preferences for synchronous learning in Arabic(L1).The results also showed that the participants had greater preferences for synchronous online courses over asynchronous online courses.These findings mirror those found in earlier studies.The descriptive statistics revealed that learners had a strong preference for having direct conversations with the teacher,having more flexibility,studying on their own,and learning new materials through discussions with others or through having someone explain it to them.
    • School leadership mentoring characteristics in an era of significant educational reform.

      Monahan, Bobbie Jo (2012-05-18)
      The state of Indiana is undergoing substantial educational reform,as is the nation.Educational leaders are in great need of support as they address reform initiatives.The support that educational leaders receive from mentors/coaches may be a determining factor in how they embrace the latest reform and work with their school communities.The primary purpose of this study was to understand the role of experienced superintendents/district leaders as mentors and coaches to new superintendents/district leaders in times of stressful educational reform.Four experienced district leaders were interviewed using the research method of qualitative inquiry.Based on the perceptions of four experienced district leaders in response to interview questions involving leadership skills outlined by the National Association of Secondary School Principals:Mentoring and Coaching-Developing Educational Leaders,the following conclusions were made:1)The mentor's leadership style is significant in the mentoring of new district leaders.Each participant described his or her leadership styles differently,yet there is a connection of high involvement in their organizations and the need to adapt their leadership to each unique situation. 2)Legislative agendas are directly impacting district leadership.Both Indiana Senate Bill No 575(Collective Bargaining Act,2011a)and Indiana Senate Bill No 1(Teaching Evaluation and Licensing Act,2011b)clearly focus on district leaders.3)Stress defines educational leadership and is a persistent topic between mentors and mentees. 4)Stress is a positive factor in leading.However,the stress from current educational reform is viewed as a positive factor in leading amidst the negative stressors. 5)Successful mentoring practices in education among participants are more informal than formal.6)The reasons for mentoring in an educational setting are grounded in feeling of moral accountability regarding mentoring and giving back to the craft of leading.
    • Science Museums, Centers and Professional Development: Teachers Self Reflection on Improving Their Practice

      Ogbomo, Queen O. (2010-07-20)
      The purpose of this qualitative case study research was to ascertain the significance of the professional development programs workshops organized by a science museum and a science center in two Midwestern cities. The research investigated the effect the workshops had on the instructional practice of the participating elementary science teachers. More specifically, this study was guided by the following research question: How do the professional development programs at museums help teachers change the way they teach and consider science in their classroom? The core of this study consists of case studies of six elementary school teachers who were identified as a result of their participation in the museum and science center workshops and an instructor from the museum and another instructor from the science center. Teachers‟ selfefficacy regarding the teaching of science was sought through a Likert-style survey and triangulated with classroom observations and interviews of individual teachers. The findings of this study revealed two overarching themes: one, that the workshops were beneficial and two, that it did not improve instructional practice. The following are the factors identified as reasons for the workshops being beneficial: 1) the opportunity to build their content knowledge, 2) opportunity to experience and discuss the materials: 3) opportunity to collaborate with colleagues: 4) workshop materials and resources are linked to state goals: and 5) that they promote teacher confidence. The teachers who thought the workshops did not improve their instructional practice gave the following reasons: 1) they already had a strong background in science: 2) there was no follow-up activity: 3) the loss of a full day of teaching: and 4) the time constraint to implement what was learned. Though this study utilized a small sample of teachers, those involved in this study felt they acquired knowledge that would be either beneficial to them or to their students and they particularly enjoyed the inquiry-based activities that were conducted in either the museum or the science center workshops.
    • Teachers’ Perceptions toward Enhancing Learning through Multiple Intelligences Theory in Elementary School: A Mixed Methods Study

      Al-Wadi, Nouf I. (2012-01-19)
      The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of multiple intelligences theory on elementary students’ academic achievement and to investigate teacher perceptions of multiple intelligences theory. The multiple intelligences school that was chosen for this study was Edwin Rhodes Elementary School. The study examined Edwin Rhodes Elementary School performance via the California Academic Performance Index. Edwin Rhodes School scores were compared with similar traditional school scores and with gifted and talented scores. The study found that the multiple intelligences school performance was between traditional and gifted and talented school performances. The study also explored teachers’ perceptions at Edwin Rhodes School toward multiple intelligences theory using a cross-sectional survey. The results of the study showed that teachers were familiar with the theory of multiple intelligences, but they did not have formal education about it, either in a teacher education program or through professional development.
    • Test-teach-test procedure in general science

      Hensley, R.W. (2013-01-22)
      Not available.
    • The Attitude of Middle Eastern Faculty toward the use of Distance Education in the Middle Eastern State Universities: A Comparative Study between the Middle Eastern Faculty and USA Faculty

      AlTameemy, Farooq A. (2010-07-27)
      Although distance education is offered in many academic institutions, specifically universities, in most of the developed countries, utilizing it as a part of the educational system in the Middle East is still in the development stage and not at the same stage as Western and European countries. Of the institutions in the Middle East that have started utilizing distance education, many face difficulties, an example of which is that these distance programs are not accredited by the educational system in the country. In turn, this leads to other problems for graduates of these distance programs, such as inability to find a job or inability to go for a higher education degree.As the faculty members of the universities in the Middle East represent a strong and an effective part of the education stake holders in the Middle East, this study investigates their attitudes toward the use of distance education in Middle Eastern universities. A comparison between the attitudes of the faculty members in the Middle East and faculty members in the United States was conducted.The study involved 139 faculty members from the Middle East, who live and work in Yemen, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, and Bahrain; and 126 participants from the United States, who work at various universities. To investigate their attitudes toward the use of distance education, a web-based survey was created in two versions, Arabic and English, and a link to it was sent out to participants via email.The study results showed negative attitudes of Middle Eastern faculty members in the use of technology, culture and social, economic, location, policies, educational, academic achievement and availability of distance education tools factors. When compared to the faculty members in the USA, Middle Eastern faculty members showed more negative attitudes toward the use of distance education.
    • The compositional style of keith emerson in Tarkus(1971)for the rock music trio emerson,lake and palmer.

      Ford, Peter T (2012-05-10)
      British composer and keyboardist Keith Emerson(b.1944)has composed for various mediums,which include piano,orchestra and rock trio.A consistent level of musical awareness is manifested in all three of these mediums,and a unique compositional style can be identified by studying the rhythmic,melodic,harmonic,and formal language of his music.The subject of this discussion is one representative large-scale work,Tarkus(1971),as it appears on side one of the eponymous album recorded by the rock music trio Emerson,Lake and Palmer (ELP).The Tarkus album was released in 1971 during the early initial ELP period.Theintent of this thesis is to define and document the compositional approaches keyboardist Keith Emerson took when writing the suite Tarkus for Emerson,Lake and Palmer.Following a biographical chapter,this study examines each of the seven movements of the suite,detailing Emerson's compositional treatment of instrumentation,text (where applicable),rhythm,texture,harmony,melody,counterpoint and form.An eclectic analytical approach is taken,with theoretical descriptions of vertical and linear events including traditional functioning harmony,jazz chord symbols,atonal set theory,and other devices.Emerson's compositional collaboration with Greg Lake on certain meovements is also addressed.A Summary and Conclusions chapter ends the study.Tarkus was chosen for analysis for the following reasons:it is oen of the few large-scale works by Emerson with a published score;it contains representative a large-scale work from the beginning of the early initial ELP period,Emerson's most prolific and successful period to date.Emerson's compositional style in Tarkus is consistent with both earlier and later works,as it involves an abundance of harmonic and melodic intervals of a fourth,the use of ostinatos,and the recurrence of compound meters.
    • The Correlation between Academic Achievements, Self-Esteem and Motivation of Female Seventh Grade Students: A Mixed Methods Approach

      Henman, Karen (2010-07-20)
      During the early grades, female students generally display enthusiasm for learning science. As these same students go though school, however, their level of motivation changes. Once female students reach high school, many lack the confidence to take chemistry and physics. Then, in college they lack the background necessary to major in chemistry, physics, and engineering. This study used quantitative data to investigate the correlation between female students' motivation, self-esteem, and standards-based state science achievement tests combined with a qualitative survey of student’s perceptions of parents’ attitudes toward science. The Children’s Science Motivation Inventory (CAIMI) determined students’ levels of motivation toward science. The Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory (CSEI) ascertained female students’ overall self-esteem. The ISTEP+ exam given in the 6th grade measured the students’ academic achievement in science. Trained examiners who interviewed students comprised the qualitative component of the study. Each examiner elaborated on selected questions from the CSEI and CAIMI to determine the students’ perceptions of parental attitudes toward science. A multiple regression was used to determine the correlation between self-esteem, motivation, and achievement in science. The correlation was strongest between motivation. Interviews revealed parents and teachers had the most influence on students' perception of science. In understanding the correlation between female students’ motivation, achievement, and self-esteem, schools will gain further knowledge into how students relate to the academic field of science and can thus promote females' participation in more science courses in high school. This then will provide females the necessary background knowledge to pursue a greater number of science majors in college.
    • The development and change process needed for the implementation of the electronic writing protfolio to assess student writing at Eastern Illinois University.

      Hopgood, Debra Cross (2012-05-10)
      The purpose of this study was to analyse how the adoption of an electronic writing portfolio led to institutional change at an institution of higher education that chose to adopt the Electronic Writing Portfolio(EWP)to assess the writing skills of their students.This study also analyzed the perceptions and experiences of key administrators and faculty that participated in the adoption of the EWP.The research questions addressed in this study were:1)To what extent has the institution demonstrated that the EWP is linked to the mission of the institution? 2)What is the institutional evidence that faculty participated in the development of the EWP? 3) what is the institutional evidence that the EWP is institution-wide in conceptualization and scope? 4)To what degree has the perceptions of key faculty and administrators,regarding the development and implementation process of the EWP,been congruent with the Four-Frame Model for organizational change developed by Bolman and deal(1997)? The research was a qualitative study using a case study design.Eastern Ilinois University,located in Charleston,Illinois was the case study institution.The case study was conducted in accordance with the protocol established in Research Designs by John W Creswell(1994).Information was gathered from archival data and through interviews with key faculty and administrators.A literature review related to organizational change and assessment in higher education was conducted.Minutes taken from meetings of the Committee for the Assessment of Student Learning were reviewed and analysed.Minutes from the Writing Across the Curriculum and the Council on Academic Affairs were also reviewed and analyzed.The conclusions indicated that faculty and administrators consistently demonstrated in their interviews that the Electronic Writing Portfolio and the University's mission statement are linked.Faculty also consistently demonstrated that faculty was engaged in the development of the Electronic Writing Portfolio.Interviews also indicated,however,that administrators believe there was not enough faculty involvement.The research also indicated,that the issue of second tier assessment has not been resolved.This indicated congruence with Bolman and Deal's(1997)political framework,which states that conflict is natural and inevitable.Future study is recommended to analyze the effects of the fully implemented EWP from student's freshman through senior year.The effects of the EWP on teaching and learning should be studied as well.Additionally,a study is recommended to analyze why there is a difference of opinion between faculty and administartion concerning the level of faculty participation in the development and implementation of the EWP.
    • The differences of information technology visions between the faculty and students in the engineering laptop institution.

      Yamamoto, Toshiyuki (2012-05-10)
      The main purpose of this study was to examine the Information Technology Visions of the faculty and the students in the engineering college with atleast five years of history of being a laptop institution.A survey was conducted in the Division of Human Information Sciences at Kanazawa Institute of Technology in Kanazawa,Japan which has been a laptop institution since 1993.Furthermore,the relationship between the Information Technology Vision(henceforth,IT Visions)and computer skills was examined independently at the faculty's level and at the student's level.An original instrument was developed from Delcourt et al.(1994) and Janz(1999) as the basis for the survey.The instrument contained four parts:Part I included questions about demographic information;Part II included questions regarding prior experience in Information Technology;Part III included questions about the IT Vision;Part IV included questions about computer skills.The uniqueness of this instrument was that both the faculty and the students were examined using the same instrument.The participants in the survey were all faculty members in the Division of Human Information Science:24 male professors and 644 students.All 24 professors were selected as the faculty sample.50 students were randomly selected from a completed survey pool with the method of a stratified sampling conforming to the student population radio of 91% male and 9% female.This study was composed of three examinations:The difference of the IT Vision between the faculty sample and the stratified student sample;the relationship between the IT Vision and computer skills in the faculty sample;the relationship between the IT Vision and computer skills in the stratified student sample.Results showed that the IT Vision of the faculty and that of the students were significantly different.The student's IT Vision was higher than the faculty's.Further,the correlation results showed that the faculty's IT Vision was not significantly correlated with their computer skills,while the student's IT Visions was significantly correlated with their computer skills.
    • The effect of Instrument Type on the measure of Hydration Status

      Niemann, Andrew (2012-05-18)
      Context: Although some instruments have been validated for clinical measure of hydration status, new and currently invalid instruments are available for purchase and clinical use. Athletic trainers commonly use these instruments to assess hydration status for weight checks and body mass loss charts due to their ease of use. However, the validity of these popular instruments has not yet been established. Objective: To determine the validity of urine specific gravity (USG) for the assessment of hydration status via the following instruments: handheld clinical refractometer, pen style digital refractometer, and midget urinometer as compared to the gold standard urine osmometer(OSMO). Design: Descriptive diagnostic validity study. Setting: Biochemical research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Healthy active men and women (n=108;mean age=22±4yrs; self reported height=174±20cm and mass=75±17kg) were recruited among faculty and students on a university campus. Interventions: The independent variable was instrument type with four levels: osmometer, handheld clinical refractometer, pen style digital refractometer, and midget urinometer. After recruitment, participants completed an informed consent and a short health history questionnaire to rule out any exclusionary criteria such as kidney disease or chronic urinary tract infection. Participants were then given a clean standard urine cup and asked to provide as much sample as possible, providing more than one cup when possible. Main Outcome Measures: Hydration status was measured by USG and OSM. USG was evaluated by a handheld clinical refractometer, pen style digital refractometer, and midget urinometer. The gold standard OSM was calculated by a freezing point depression osmometer. Z scores were calculated for each instrument and Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients were evaluated to examine the relationship between each instrument of USG and OSM. Results: Strong significant correlations were identified for the digital refractometer (r=0.814, p< 0.001) and handheld clinical refractometer (r=0.943, p< 0.001) with OSM. A weak statistically insignificant correlation was established between the midget urinometer (r=0.133, p< 0.142) and OSM. Average hydration status indicated variability among some of the instruments: digital refractometer USG=1.0194±0.0075, clinical refractometer USG=1.020±0.007, urinometer USG=1.028±0.091, osmometer OSM=743±271) Conclusions: Handheld clinical refractometry can be used confidently for assessing hydration status as it shows a strong significant correlation with the gold standard osmometer, which is consistent with previous literature. Additionally, the use of the pen style digital refractometer showed a strong, significant correlation with the gold standard osmometer and provides clinicians with another option for the clinical assessment of USG and hydration status. The findings of this also study suggest that the use of a midget urinometer should be performed with extreme caution, as it showed a weak correlation with the gold standard osmometer, indicating it might not provide accurate results when used to determine hydration status.
    • The effects of supportive interventions on first-year teacher efficacy.

      Johnson, Li-Yen K. (2012-05-09)
      Purpose of study:The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of supportive interventions on first-year teacher efficacy.Two Rand Studies(1976 & 1977)and a study by Kilgore and Kozisek(1989)provided the theoretical framework for this investigation.Procedures:One hundred and fourty-four first-year teachers in the Indianapolis Public Schools received a questionnaire to participate in this study.Ninety-five teachers responded to the questionnaire.The response rate for the teacher questionnaires was 66%.The questionnaire was divided into five parts.The first part measured teacher efficacy.This was determined by answers given to questions regarding the confidence level of first-year teachers in areas such as classroom discipline,instruction,assessment,and public relations.The second part measured teacher support from peeople other than the mentor.This was a measure of school climate.The third part measured instructional guidance.Instructional guidance was defined as the feedback given to teachers on their performance.The fourth part was a measure of principal support.Teachers rated how often each of fifteen behaviors was associated with principals.The fifteen behaviors included discussion on district and school policies,classroom observation,invitations to school gatherings,suggestions on assessment,assistance with teaching strategies,demonstration of lessons,assistance with administrative paperwork,encouragement to attend professional development activities,and assistance with classroom management.The fifth part was a measure of mentor support.Teachers again rated how often each of same fifteen behaviors was associated with mentoring.Demongraphic data were collected,analysed and reported.Descriptive data were tabulated and analyzed to determine whether mentor support,teacher support,principal support,and instructional guidance had an effect on first-year teacher efficacy.Findings:Four hypotheses were tested in this research project.Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics,Pearson correlation,and regression analysis.The building Environment or climate(support),instructional guidance,and principal support had an effect on teacher efficacy.There were significant relationships found between efficacy and suppport,instructional guidance,and principal support.However,there was not a significant relationship found between efficacy and mentoring.This information suggests that mentoring support cannot increase first-year teacher efficacy and teacher efficacy is related to the building climate(teacher support),instructional guidance,and principal support.Furthermore,aditional item correlation analysis reveals that a sense of accomplishment,job satisfaction,and sufficient materials do significantly impact first-year teacher efficacy.The results of this study should be of interest to both district and school level administrators.Since teacher efficacy is related to teacher retention and student achievement,district and school level administrators should make every effort to create a professional environment that values collegiality and positive school climate.
    • The impact of creative problem solving for general education intervention teams on team member's ratings of treatment acceptability.

      Grimes, Jennifer L (2012-05-09)
      Many states require or recommend school-based,problem solving teams in an effort to develop interventions to address student and teacher needs.Often these teams have not been trained in a structured problem-solving process,which is thought to improve the quality of interventions developed by a team.Creative Problem Solving(CPS)is a problem-solving process developed from creativity and cognitive psychology literature and has been found to increase team effectiveness.CPS has been modified for use with school-based,problem-solving teams,which are called General Education Intervention(GEI)teams in the state of Indiana,to assist in developing quality interventions.This modified process is called CPS for GEI teams.School-based problem-solving teams,CPS and treatment acceptability literature were discussed.The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of training in CPS for GEI teams on team member's ratings of familiarity,acceptability and perceived effectiveness of interventions.A self-report instrument,developed from the literature,assessed team member's ratings of familiarity,acceptability and perceived effectiveness of positive,negative and consultation intervention types by problem severity.There were 89 participants from 23 elementary schools that completed pre and posttest surveys in this treatment(CPS-GEI trained)vs control(untrained)group experimental design.Findings indicated that training in CPS-GEI significantly increases teams member's familiarity ratings for all intervention types measured,acceptabilty ratings for all intervention types measured,acceptability ratings for positive interventions and perceived effectiveness ratings for consultation interventions.These findings suggest that training school-based,problem-solving teams in a specific process will increase team member's familiarity with interventions.Findings in this study do not support current treatment acceptability models suggesting that familiarity,acceptability,use,integrity and effectiveness are interrelated and that by changing one variable,others will change as a function of the interrelationship.
    • The impact of personality and affect on college student's motives for marijuana use.

      Hawkins, Lindsey W (2012-05-09)
      Previous research has examined the relationship between motives for drinking and alcohol use. However, less research has been conducted on the relationship between motives for marijuana use and marijuana use/problems. This study attempted to examine what predictors of marijuana use and problems are mediated by motives for marijuana use, Prior research has identified several predictors of marijuana use including psychological distress, expectancies, sensation seeking, and various personality factors. In addition, previous studies have suggested that use-related problems are not merely a function of how much of a substance one consumes, but also one's motivation for using that substance. The current study tested a series of path models treating motives for marijuana use as mediators of the relationship between various affect-related and personality variables and marijuana use in a sample of college students who had used marijuana at least once in their lifetime (N =398, 60% female, mean age =19). Results suggested that Coping motives directly predict marijuana-related problems. Also, higher psychological distress and higher Relaxation and Tension Reduction expectancies predicted using marijuana for Coping reasons. Additionally, the relationship between Openness to Experience and marijuana use and between Perceptual and Cognitive Enhancement expectancies and use were mediated by Expansion motives (i.e., using marijuana to expand awareness), Higher levels of Perceived Peer Marijuana Use and Social/Sexual Facilitation expectancies predicted Social and Enhancement motives for marijuana use.The current study also suggested that psychological distress and Neuroticism redicts Conformity motives for marijuana use.In addition,Perceived Peer Marijuana Use and Neuroticism impacted marijuana outcomes directly as well as through alternate mediational pathways.Theoretical and practical implications of the results are present,as well as suggestions for future research.
    • The impact of state energy programs and other contextual factors on US buildings energy comsumption.

      Boadu, Andrea N.Y.A Ofori (2012-05-18)
      High energy consumption in the United States has been influenced by populations, climates, income and other contextual factors. In the past decades, U.S. energy policies have pursued energy efficiency as a national strategy for reducing U.S. environmental degradation and dependence on foreign oils. The quest for improved energy efficiency has led to the development of energy efficient technologies and programs. The implementation of energy programs in the complex U.S. socio-technical environment is believed to promote the diffusion of energy efficiency technologies. However, opponents doubt the fact that these programs have the capacity to significantly reduce U.S. energy consumption. In order to contribute to the ongoing discussion, this quantitative study investigated the relationships existing among electricity consumption/ intensity, energy programs and contextual factors in the U.S. buildings sector. Specifically, this study sought to identify the significant predictors of electricity consumption and intensity, as well as estimate the overall impact of selected energy programs on electricity consumption and intensity. Using state-level secondary data for 51 U.S. states from 2006 to 2009, seven random effects panel data regression models confirmed the existence of significant relationships among some energy programs, contextual factors, and electricity consumption/intensity. The most significant predictors of improved electricity efficiency included the price of electricity, public benefits funds program, building energy codes program,financial and informational incentives program and the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program. Consistently, the Southern region of the U.S. was associated with high electricity consumption and intensity; while the U.S. commercial sector was the greater benefactor from energy programs. On the average, energy programs were responsible for approximately 7% of the variation observed in electricity consumption and intensity, over and above the variation associated with the contextual factors. This study also had implications in program implementation theory, and revealed that resource availability, stringency and adherence had significant impacts on program outcomes. Using seven classification tables, this study categorized and matched the predictors of electricity consumption and intensity with the specific energy sectors in which they demonstrated statistical significance. Project developers, energy advocates, policy makers, program administrators, building occupants and other stakeholders could use study findings in conjunction with other empirical findings, to make informed decisions regarding the adoption, continuation or discontinuation of energy programs, while taking contextual factors into consideration. The adoption and efficient implementation of the most significant programs could reduce U.S. electricity consumption, and in the long term, possibly reduce U.S. energy waste, environmental degradation, energy imports, energy prices, and demands for expanding energy generation and distribution infrastructure.
    • The impact of the September11,2001 tragedy on Saudi high school student's attitudes toward studying in the United States of America.

      Alzamil, Abdullah (2012-05-09)
      This thesis is a qualitative study of the Impact of September 11,2001 Tragedy on Saudi High School Student's Attitudes Studying in America.Its main aim is to 1)find the Saudi high school student's attitudes toward studying in the US,2)investigate in-depth the factors that make Saudi high school students choose a specific country to study in,3)identify the obstacles and barriers that prevent Saudi high school students from studying in the US due to the impact of September 11 attacks on the US from their perspectives,and 4)find out the Saudi high school student's suggestion's to solve these problems.The subjects of the study are 15 high school students coming from frive educational zones in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.Their ages range from 18-19.The data collected are based on their responses in both the focus group discussion and the in-depth interviews.The subject's responses were audio-recorded and analysed.The main findings of the research are:one,there do appear to be negative attitudes among Saudi students toward studying abroad in general and in the US specifically.Two,the majority of the students considered their safe and friendly enviornment and their parents worries and concerns as the major factors that affect their choice of study in a particular country.Quality of education was placed as the least important factor.Three,Saudi students believe that visa restrictions and regulations and new rules applied on Saudis are among the barriers that prevent them from studying in the United States.