Now showing items 21-40 of 52

    • A survey of industrial recreation in Indiana

      Arnett, Robert Edwin (2013-05-03)
      Not available.
    • A History of the Indiana Pocket Athletic Conference

      Scheller, Robert (2013-04-09)
      Not available.
    • A study of eight-man football in Indiana

      Broadwell, Charles Cecil (2013-03-04)
      Not available.
    • Behaviors and Perceptions Concerning Online Nutrition Information Among Young Adult Midwest University Students

      Moeckly, Brenda (2013-02-18)
      Since the inception of the Internet, Americans have become increasingly dependent upon this medium for gleaning information, with each new generation being more apt to seek information online. This general trend has affected, among many other things, the search for health and nutrition information. While the Internet can provide a wealth of beneficial information for users, it can pose a myriad of dangers, as well, if users do not know how to look for credible information. The objectives of this study were to determine where university students search for nutrition information and what criteria they use when seeking nutrition information online. The population sampled was from a Midwest University. Participants were selected via convenience sampling methods. Students were invited to participate in an online survey available campuswide. Data was analyzed using SPSS statistical software. This study found that 73% of students surveyed indicated they use the Internet to search for nutrition information online. Government websites and product websites were shown to be chosen most often as being visited for nutrition information. The credibility criteria most often chosen as being important included date of publication or update of information, the information’s being authored by a medical doctor, and the web address ending in “.gov.” The results of this study identified that the majority of university students sampled used the Internet when searching for nutrition information and identified several criteria that students use when determining online nutrition information’s credibility. These results can be used to help health professionals, and registered dietitians in particular, know how best to provide and promote online health and nutrition information for consumers. Young adults are leading the trend of searching for health and nutrition information online, and registered dietitians need to provide timely, and understandable information for the public in order to best meet their needs.
    • Risk Characteristics of Healthcare Workers that Decline Voluntary Influenza Vaccination

      Epler, Caroline (2013-02-11)
      Influenza, also known as the flu, is one of the most common seasonal illnesses with outbreaks occurring each year. Transmission of the influenza virus in a hospital setting is a significant concern, because although most cases of influenza are mild, up to 25% require outpatient medical care, as many as 4% require inpatient care, and 1% require intensive care. One way to prevent influenza is through vaccination of those deemed to be high risk for contracting and spreading the disease, such as healthcare workers. The purpose of this study was to identify personal, demographic and professional characteristics of healthcare workers who decline influenza vaccination in a Southeastern United States teaching hospital. Characteristics examined in this study included gender, ethnicity, number of years employed at the hospital, personnel role and level of patient contact. The method for this research involved the utilization of existing (secondary) data from the 2010-2011 flu vaccination program gained from the employee database of the hospital. A population consisting of 22,845 healthcare workers was observed. Findings included identification of African Americans as the ethnic group with the highest declination rate. Healthcare workers with little patient contact also had high rates of declination. While physicians and nurses had relatively low rates of declination, environmental service workers had a high rate of declination. This study concluded that although specific groups were identified with high rates of declination, further research is needed to determine the reason behind declination amongst these groups and if any relationship can be made with regard to education level or job title that affects declination of the influenza vaccine. Future research is needed to understand why healthcare workers decline vaccination and how to improve vaccination rates in this population.
    • A study of the Indiana high school basketball tournaments

      Bevington, Raymond H. (2013-02-11)
      Not available.
    • The Effects of A Gluteus Medius Training Protocol on Muscle Activation and Postural Control

      Dorpinghaus, Nathan (2012-10-22)
      Context: Researchers have suggested a weak or dysfunctional gluteus medius (GM) has been linked to a number of lower extremity injuries. Identifying an appropriate intervention to prevent or correct GM deficits and determine associated outcomes has become a subject of increased interest. Objective: To determine if GM training changes lower extremity muscle activation during a dynamic task. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Biomechanics research laboratory. Participants: Eighteen healthy, physically active participants (7 men, 11 women; age=21.2±2.01yrs; height=168.39±8.92cm; mass=77.76±16.39kg) volunteered for the study. Each participant served as their own control. Intervention(s): Muscle activation of 5 trunk muscles were measured bilaterally before and after the protocol during a single-leg drop landing (45cm). All of the participants completed a six week GM training protocol. Main Outcome Measure(s): Peak and mean muscle activation was measured 400ms pre-and post-landing (pre-mean, pre-peak, post-mean, post-peak). Muscle activation data was normalized using maximal voluntary contractions. Results: No significant differences were observed during the control period. Decreased muscle activation was observed in the non-dominant GM [pre-mean (F1,17=14.301, P=.001), pre-peak (F1,17=9.490, P=.007), post-mean (F1,17=5.373, P=.033), and post-peak (F1,17=4.678, P=.045)]. Increased biceps femoris (BF) mean muscle activation was observed on the dominant leg pre-landing (F1,17=4.752, P=.044). Conclusions: Six weeks of GM training was enough time to observe improved neuromuscular efficiency of the GM. Increased BF muscle activation prior to landing suggests participants had an increased feedforward response in preparation for landing following training. Therefore, the combination of improved neuromuscular efficiency and a greater feedforward response suggest pelvic stabilization may be improved during a single-leg drop landing as a result of six weeks of GM training. This study suggests clinicians should incorporate bilateral GM exercises to improve lower extremity neuromuscular efficiency and feedforward responses which may improve pelvic stabilization. Key words: Electromyography, lower extremity injury, rehabilitation, neuromuscular efficiency, single-leg drop landing.
    • Collegiate Student Athlete<br /> Perception of Satisfaction <br /> and Comfort with<br /> Athletic Training Students

      Tebbe, Keith (2012-10-22)
      TITLE: Collegiate student athlete perceptions of satisfaction and comfort with athletic training students CONTEXT: Athletic training students (ATS) and student athletes have a large amount of interaction with one another. Many other medical professions study the interaction that their students have with a patient population. OBJECTIVE: Investigate student athlete’s perception, satisfaction, and comfort with ATSs. DESIGN: Online survey. SETTING: Student athletes at CAATE- accredited institutions. PARTICIPANTS: 66 student athletes (20 male, 46 female) from 22 universities DATA COLLECTION: The survey consisted of 3 yes/no questions, 5 demographic questions, 1 multiple-answer question asking the participant to select characteristics that describe an ATS, 21 Likert scale questions based off previous perception and comfort studies, and 5 open ended questions. ANALYSIS: Analyzed for statistics of central tendency RESULTS: Student primarily perceive ATSs for taping ankles (n=62, 93.9%), distributing water/sports drinks (n= 62, 93.9%), and rehabilitating injuries (n=60, 90.9%). Athletes did not perceive ATSs as licensed health care professionals and minimally perceived ATS as participating in emergency care. Athletes were most satisfied with of respect ATSs demonstrated (4.3±0.8). Student athletes were least satisfied with ATSs’ communication with coaches (3.7±1.2) Student athletes were most comfortable with the ATS asking the ATC when unsure of an injury (4.7±0.5). Student athletes were least comfortable with discussing personal issues with an ATS (3.6±1.0). CONCLUSIONS: We found that in general, student athletes were satisfied and comfortable with the ATSs at their institution. ATSs, like other medical profession students, are receiving satisfactory marks from their patient population. KEYWORDS: athlete, athletic training student, satisfaction, comfort
    • The Effects of Playing<br /> Surfaces on Landing<br /> Mechanics During A<br /> Jump Rebound-Landing<br /> Task

      Stankowski, Kayla (2012-10-22)
      CONTEXT: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common among physically active people. Most ACL injuries occur from a noncontact mechanism such as landing from a jump. It is well known that neuromuscular risk factors, such as poor landing mechanics can increase the risk for ACL injury. However, it is unknown how playing surfaces affect landing mechanics. OBJECTIVE: Determine if landing on different athletic surfaces effects landing mechanics. DESIGN: Repeated measures design SETTING: Research Laboratory and Gymnasium PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-two healthy, physically active individuals (14 males, 18 females; age=20±2years; height= 172.1±9.7 cm and mass=71±14kg) were recruited to participate in this study. INTERVENTION: Independent variable was surface type, a wood basketball court and a volleyball sport court. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Landing mechanics, assessed by the LESS. A paired samples t-test was performed to compare the mean LESS scores on each surface within participants. RESULTS: No significant differences (P=0.22) were identified between the LESS scores on the wood basketball court (6±1) and the volleyball sport court surfaces (6±2) within each participant. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study demonstrated no differences in landing mechanics between a wood basketball court and a volleyball sport court surface as assessed by LESS scores. Clinicians and researchers should also take into consideration that shoes were not standardized between participants, which could alter results due to differences in shoe-surface interaction. Therefore future research should examine other athletic playing surfaces, including outdoor surfaces such as grass and artificial turf as well as standardize shoes worn by participants.
    • Dynamic Warm-Up Effect on 5-Km Performance and Running Economy in Collegiate Cross-Country Runners

      Wunderlich, Adriane (2012-10-19)
      The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a dynamic warm-up on running economy (RE) and 5-km performance compared to a control protocol in collegiate cross-country runners. Fifteen male cross-country runners underwent both a half-mile warm-up run at 65% VO2max followed by either a dynamic stretching protocol or a control protocol. After the protocols, subjects completed a 5-km performance for evaluation of RE and performance. Sit-and-reach scores were recorded both before and after each protocol. RE was measured as the total calories expended during each 5-km and performance time was recorded. There was no significant interaction for the sit-and-reach. After the dynamic warm-up the sit-and-reach did not significantly increase (29.10 ± 13.66 to 31.23 ±12.42cm; p>0.05) and did not significantly increase after the control protocol (29.08± 12.7 to 29.00± 13.46cm; p>0.05). Also, values post-dynamic drills were not significantly greater than those for the control protocol (p>0.05). Running economy was not statistically different across conditions (dynamic: 234 ± 26kcals; control: 239 ± 25kcals ;p>0.05). There was no significant difference found among 5-km performance time (dynamic: 18 minutes, 0 seconds ± 52.52; control: 18 minutes, 26 seconds ± 55.00 seconds; p>0.05). These findings suggest that dynamic stretching does not increase hamstring flexibility nor affect RE or performance in NCAA male distance runners.
    • A study of health habits of senior high-school girls

      Jones, Mary V. (2012-08-09)
      Not Available.
    • Signs of health in school children that a teacher should know

      Albright, Aaron (2012-07-25)
      Not Available.
    • A comparison of elementary <br />mathematics achievement in everyday<br /> math and saxon <br />math schools in illinois

      Roan, Clayton (2012-05-18)
      This study compared mathematics achievement in Illinois elementary schools using the Everyday Math and Saxon Math curricula. The Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) was used as the measure of student achievement. Multiple correlation analyses showed that the type of curriculum used was a significant predictor of mathematics achievement at the third and fifth grade levels. Everyday Math was found to support greater student achievement in these grades. When holding other variables constant, Everyday Math schools can be expected to have an average of 2.1% more questions correct on the multiple choice portion of the ISAT than Saxon Math schools at the third grade level. At the fifth grade level, Everyday Math schools are predicted to have an average of 4.3% more questions correct than Saxon Math schools. The type of curriculum used was not a significant predictor at the fourth grade level. Analysis of student achievement by subgroup found that Everyday Math supported significantly greater student achievement than Saxon Math for White students in third and fifth grades, non-Asian minorities in fifth grade, girls in third grade, non low income students in third grade, and non-IEP students in third grade. Multiple correlation analyses for content strands found that curriculum was a significant predictor for elementary student achievement on each mathematics content strand tested in Illinois. Everyday Math was found to support significantly greater student achievement for each content strand. After analyzing the correlation coefficients for curriculum, schools using Everyday Math were found to have between 2.1% and 3.5% more questions correct on the content strand portions of the ISAT. Though Saxon Math was not found to support significantly greater achievement in any area statistically, average scores for low-income students using Saxon Math were better than those of low-income students using Everyday Math at each grade level. This suggests a potential weakness of the Everyday Math curriculum.