• Multicultural Competence of Student Affairs Administrators at Member Institutions of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities

      Porter, Paul Lawrence
      The purpose of this study was to determine if statistically significant relationships existed between multicultural competence and a series of independent variables among select student affairs administrators at member institutions of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. Specifically, this study sought to examine personal and institutional variables such as race, age, gender, professional level in student affairs, years’ experience, location of current institution, levels of diversity training, and the existence of diversity-based resources, such as an office of diversity, a chief diversity officer, or a diversity/multicultural mission statement. Participants were administered the Multicultural Competence in Student Affairs-Preliminary 2 (MCSA-P2) instrument (Pope & Mueller, 2000) and a participant questionnaire created by the researcher. Participants for this study included 115 student affairs administrators among 33 Christian colleges and universities in 17 states. A simple linear regression was conducted to determine relationships among multicultural competence and eight independent variables. The analysis determined that three variables--race, diversity training, and professional level were significantly linked to multicultural competence (p < .05). The variables of age and years’ experience were not significantly related. Additionally, although not significantly related to multicultural competence, the variables of gender (p = .075) and geographic location (p = .063) approached significance.
    • The perception of servant leadership characteristics and job satisfaction in a church-related college

      Thompson, Robert S
      Church-related colleges are facing diverse and complex challenges.The campus leadership has found the traditional leadership approaches to be inadequate to meet these new challenges and is seeking solutions.Numerous leadership approaches offer potential solutions,but church-related institutions need an approach fitting the ethos of the institution culture as well as matching the values of the institution and allowing for the use of other leadership practices and styles.Servant leadership has been proposed as a viable leadership model for church-related college leaders.In light of the absence of scholarly research on servant leadership,this study has provided an objective and quantifiable study of servant leadership and job satisfaction at a church-related college.One hundred sixteen employees of the college were administered a combined survey consisting of Laub's Organizational Leadership Assessment(OLA)instrument and the short form of the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire(MSQ).The participants were viewed by both the administrative level(Institutional Leadership,Management,Faculty,and Technical)and the functional area(Academic Affairs and Student Services).The institution in this study was found not to be a servant organization as classified using Laub's schema.An analysis of variance was performed to see if differences existed between administrative levels and between functional areas.Surprisingly,no statistically significant differences were found to exist between administrative levels.This contradicts earlier findings.However,a statistically significant difference was found to exist between the functional areas of Academic Affairs and Student services.Confirming Laub's assertion that the perception of servant leadership positively impacts job satisfaction,a statistically significant,positive correlation was found to exist between the perceptions of job satisfaction characteristics and job satisfaction.
    • The Pigskin and the Cross: Intercollegiate Football on the Faith-Based Campus

      Davis, Jody Michael
      This qualitative study examined the mission, role, and fit of intercollegiate football programs at two faith-based higher education institutions. This intersection of faith and football is rarely discussed, though on these campuses the football program wields considerable power due to the roster size, student makeup, and resources consumed. Further, faith-based institutions are called to evaluate each curricular and extracurricular program against the mission of the institution which is, at least in part, to serve Christ‟s kingdom. Seventeen faculty and administrator interviews and three student focus groups were conducted, as well as game day observation, document review, and archival research. Five themes emerged from the data: (a) coach as referent leader, (b) everyone loves a winner, (c) mission and values alignment, (d) disconnect with the student body, and (e) enrollment management and community relations lever. The findings resulted in implications for campus constituents who are interested in the interplay between athletics and the campus environment as well as recommendations for areas of future research.