• Relationship between First Year Success Programs and Second-Year Persistence

      Rupley, Elissa
      Much research has been conducted on the success and retention of first-year students. Little research has been done on second-year students and their experiences. This study was completed to understand the experience of second year students.The purpose of this research study was to explore the attitudes, perceptions, and experiences of current second-year students who participated in the Academic Opportunity Program at Indiana State University to determine if the skills gained during the program transfer to the second-year. Focus groups were conducted to collect data. The results revealed that while the Academic Opportunity Program at Indiana State University is a great opportunity for many students there are changes that could benefit many of the students. Results indicated that motivation, both intrinsic and extrinsic types of motivation, is a key factor in student success and retention.
    • Spirituality and Binge Drinking Among College Students

      Kutnow,James
      One area of great interest to student affairs administrators is the spirituality of college students. Due to recent publications that have opened up communication for more discussion on student spirituality and because of thorough research by the Higher Education Research Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles, student spirituality is gaining attention. Also of great interest to college administrators is the importance of reducing high risk drinking behaviors among their students. This study examined the relationship between student spirituality and binge drinking among college students at a large, Midwestern university. Results from this research found that there was a significant and negative correlation between spirituality and binge drinking. Understanding this relationship will help universities tackle binge drinking patterns in an innovative way.
    • The Experience of Baccalaureate Degree Seeking Nursing Students Undergoing The Process of Clinical Evaluation Appraisal

      McCutchan, Judith A.
      This phenomenological qualitative study examines the experiences of nine baccalaureate nursing students undergoing the clinical evaluation process at two institutions. The clinical performance appraisal (CPA), an identified challenge for faculty and students alike, is a tool utilized for assessing nursing students‟ behaviors in the clinical setting. The national need for registered nurses that is projected to increase 22.2% by the year 2018 is cause for alarm. The importance for nursing faculty to understand and implement the clinical evaluation process is an important part of meeting this need while facilitating student learning. The lived experiences of nine student nurses were collected by way of semi-structured, digitally recorded, and in-depth interviews. Based upon the analysis of data, four major themes emerged: (a) the impact of an absent instructor; (b) all instructors are different; (c) input into the evaluation process; and (d) the evaluation process is a formality. Implications and recommendations for higher education are presented. To complete the study, recommendations for research and conclusions are made.
    • The Experiences of Working-Class College Students Who Became University Presidents

      Springer, Mary E.
      Working-class students enter college lacking necessary capital to predict their academic and personal success making college success less likely than for middle class students (Bufton, 2003; Mack, 2006; Paulsen & St. John, 2002; Rose, 1997; Wegner, 1973). This same social class origin helps to define experiences, provides context for understanding these experiences, and ultimately can be a strong motivation to succeed. With the help of personal and professional mentors, strong working-class family values, and an innate drive to succeed, the university presidents in this study have survived in a culture in which they did not have the necessary capital to naturally be academically, personally, and professionally successful. With a strong proportion of today’s first-time college students enrolling directly from high school, almost 55% nationally, and almost 40% nationally coming from working-class backgrounds, the university presidents in this study have provided a strong insight into the experiences and culture of working-class college students and those who become university presidents (U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2008).