• County superintendency in Indiana

      Fox, Crawford
      Not Available.
    • Factors That Impact the Perceived Confidence of Indiana Public School Principals in the Area of Special Education Practices

      Rinehart, Tara L.
      The purpose of this quantitative study was to identify factors that impact the perceived confidence of Indiana school principals in the area of special education practices. This study utilized a web-based survey to assess Indiana principals‘ perceptions about their confidence related to special education practices. The variables tested included the role prior to becoming an administrator, the years of experience as an administrator, the highest degree attained by an administrator, whether an administrator has ever participated in college coursework in the preparation program related to educating students with disabilities, and whether an administrator has ever participated in any training outside of their preparation program related to educating students with disabilities.
    • Principal Perceptions About the Implementation and Effectiveness of Online Learning in Public High Schools in Indiana

      Rayle, Timothy W.
      The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine the principal perceptions and demographic relationship of the implementation and effectiveness of online learning in non-charter Indiana public high schools. An analysis was prepared to determine whether demographic factors played a role in the principal‘s perceptions of the implementation and effectiveness of online learning. Factors examined included school location, school size, technology and support costs, principal‘s age, and principal‘s gender. Principal‘s perceptions were examined because the principal is considered to be the building level educational leader. As such, the principal has a responsibility to provide the students with a sound curriculum that meets their needs individually and collectively. The research design involved a population of 343 non-charter public high school principals serving grades of at least 10 – 12. Principal beliefs in the implementation and effectiveness of online learning were collected using a 44-item survey. Statistical analysis of the data included descriptive statistics regarding the mean, standard deviation, and frequency of selected items. A Pearson product moment correlation and multivariate analysis of variance were used to test the null hypotheses. Significance was identified at the .05 level. In all, 241 principals of non-charter public high schools in Indiana responded to the survey instrument which questioned the perceived level of effectiveness and perceived level of implementation of 15 specific uses of online learning. As a result of the analysis, significant findings were present in the overall perceptions of the implementation and effectiveness of online learning and also in the 15 individual uses of online learning. Significance was also found in one or more of the 15 uses of online learning in regards to the perceived implementation based upon gender, student enrollment, school locality, and the interactions based upon age and gender, and student enrollment and school locality. In addition, significance was found in one or more of the 15 uses of online learning in regards to the perceived effectiveness based upon student enrollment, school locality, and the interactions of enrollment and locality.
    • Stay the Course: Superintendent Longevity in Indiana School Districts

      Shand, Celia Herrell
      The purpose of this study was to determine what characteristics contribute to superintendent longevity in a school district for 10 years or more. A qualitative multiple case study was conducted using a sample from 11% of Indiana school superintendents who remained in their districts for 10 years or more. This random sample included superintendents from various districts. Superintendents interviewed responded to a series of five questions that explored the characteristics of community politics, size of the district, superintendent leadership characteristics, community demographics, and support systems. During the qualitative multiple case study, more questions arose as a result of the interview process and were documented. As a result of this study, it was determined that community politics, district size, certain characteristics of leadership styles, changing demographics, and sufficient support systems were integral parts of a superintendency that had these superintendents remaining in a district in Indiana for 10 years or more. The mutually, well-developed relationships created in the different characteristics between the superintendents, their boards, schools and community created a symbiotic relationship necessary for superintendent longevity in their respective districts.
    • The Personal Characteristics and Professional Skills Defining Superintendent Effectiveness

      McCormick, Jennifer G.
      The intent of this study was to determine if there were differences among Indiana public high school principals, Indiana public school superintendents, and Indiana public school board presidents about the personal characteristics and professional skills that define effective superintendents. In order to effectively determine such characteristics and skills, research and literature were reviewed; input from practicing Indiana public high school principals, Indiana public school superintendents, and Indiana public school board presidents was sought; and a survey was conducted. A generalization was made from the sample to the population regarding how each of these groups defined superintendent effectiveness. Current research and literature was reviewed in order to develop a survey instrument intended to obtain the desired input from the sample. The components of the survey were divided into two categories: personal characteristics and professional skills. The content or specific items for the survey were created for the survey from the complete list of items which were identified through the current literature in three or more sources. Based on the set criteria, the current literature facilitated the production of a survey with 14 personal characteristics and 22 professional skills. Two research questions were formulated for the study. Question one and question two were analyzed statistically through Null Hypothesis One and Null Hypothesis Two. For each null hypothesis, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine significance. The level of significance established for this study was .05. Descriptive data were also utilized to answer both research questions. Study findings showed public high school principals valued the personal characteristic of charismatic significantly higher than public school board presidents. In addition, it was concluded public high school principals valued the professional skill of serves as a child advocate significantly higher than public school board presidents, and high school principals also valued empowers/develops others significantly higher than public school board presidents. However, school board presidents valued able to meet major mandates significantly higher than high school principals in defining effective superintendents. It was also concluded that superintendents valued the professional skill of develops positive relations with board members significantly higher than public school board presidents. Yet, public school board presidents valued the professional skill of able to meet major mandates significantly higher than public school superintendents. The emerging views of leadership, along with the current unique societal, political, and economic climate demand that careful attention be placed on the personal characteristics and professional skills that define an effective superintendent. Using such information from the study for recruiting, selecting, training, and retaining effective superintendents will be important. Bringing focus to such difficult tasks as those described in the study could be very helpful in multiple ways.
    • The Religious Spirituality of an Indiana Public School Leader and its Influence on the School

      St.Peters,Timothy R.
      As schools expand secularization and laws limiting religious expression increase, one must not forget the religious spirituality of the individual. Individual religious spirituality is still protected under the United States Constitution. Many researchers feel that this religious spirituality should be nurtured, not discouraged in public schools. Multiple studies seen in the literature review show that spiritual and religious commitment directly leads to increased academic success and decreased risk taking behaviors in students. The school leader has the ability to encourage, foster, and enrich religious spirituality in students while following established law regarding the separation of church and state. All along, he or she must keep in mind that their own religious spirituality and the religious spirituality of the community may affect and, to some degree, direct how these laws are interpreted, implemented, and followed by the school leader. Questions then arise: How do school leaders implement these laws? Do the community‘s views on religious spirituality direct these decisions? Does current policy direct these decisions? Does the religious spirituality of the school leader play a role in decision making in this arena? The purpose of this qualitative case study was to look at the religious spirituality of a public school leader and to ascertain if it has any influence on the school. Does the religious spirituality of the school leader affect which after school programs are encouraged to flourish, which religious teachings are allowed through the doors (e.g., Campus Life, Young Life, community church youth groups, clergy programs), which classes are taught, what religious expressions are considered appropriate, how current law is interpreted related to religious spirituality, overall student morale, teacher/student personal relationships, moral growth opportunities for students, or which textbooks are purchased? Results were collected through observations, interviews, and documentation of artifacts at a predetermined school where religious spirituality was known to be present in the school leader. The study reviewed current trends and past decisions regarding religious spirituality and education, looked at research related to the benefits of religion and spirituality, examined one school where religious spirituality was known to be present in the school leader, and attempted to ascertain whether the religious spirituality of this school leader influences the school. This research was not meant to delve into the intricacies of the separation of church and state debate, but was intended to merely look at the religious spirituality of a public school leader and to ascertain if this has any influence on the school. Observation and interviews with this leader and his staff brought forth a great deal of information, but such a small sample in this qualitative case study could not permit generalizations (Patton, 2002).However, the study did find that the religious spirituality of the individual does not appear to lay dormant when said individual enters the public school doors, and the literature review showed that religious spirituality in the lives of individuals is inherent, wants to come out, and appears to have a positive impact. This study showed that the religious spirituality of a school leader can impact the school by allowing for religiously spiritual opportunities and growth. It was determined that this in turn has the possibility of enhancing the lives of students, allowing for opportunities for growth in young people in the area of their own religious spirituality and shows the real impact of how the religious spirituality of a school leader can impact the school.
    • The State of Induction and Mentoring in Indiana K-12 Public Schools

      Hilton, Christina Lee
      The purpose of this study was to examine how school corporation officials in Indiana’s K-12 public schools support first and second year teachers through induction and mentoring practices. An analysis was made to determine the adequacy of novice teacher support based on state and national recommendations for effective induction and mentoring practices. The collected data was analyzed to determine if the level of support that Indiana school corporation officials provide novice teachers differed due to student enrollment and/or school location (i.e. rural or urban/suburban) across the 2009/10 school year to the 2010/11 school year. A self-administered survey, Indiana School Corporation Induction and Mentoring Survey, was designed specifically for this study, and included statements based on state and federal recommendations for supporting novice teachers as well as the National Center for Educational Statistics’ Schools and Staffing Survey and the Teacher Follow-up Survey. The survey was sent to all 293 Indiana K-12 Public School Superintendents. The sample consisted of 112 completed surveys, which equated to an overall response rate of 38.2%. The data was analyzed based upon two enrollment categories, 2,000 or fewer students and 2,001+ students. Fifty-five respondents indicated enrollments of 2,000 or fewer (49%), while 57 indicated enrollments of 2,001+ (51%). The data was also analyzed by location, rural and suburban/urban with 69 respondents (62%) indicating a rural location and 43 respondents (48%) indicating a suburban/urban location. Data analysis revealed no significant differences between novice teacher support through mentoring and induction by enrollment or location. There was, however, a significant difference in the amount of support provided to novice teachers from the 2009/10 school year (more support) to the 2010/11 school year (less support). Additionally, superintendents were asked to report the average number of new teachers hired in the past five years and the number of new teachers they expected to hire for the 2010/11 school year. Superintendents were also asked if the IDOE’s revocation of the mentor component of IMAP and/or the recent budget shortfall impacted the assignment of mentors to novice teachers. School corporation officials reported a reduction in the number of new teachers hired in the previous five years (mean, 14.90) as compared to the number of new teachers expected to be hired for the 2010/11 school year (mean, 6.88). The majority of the respondents (n = 71, 63.4%) indicated that they had not or did not plan to change their assignment of mentors to novice teachers due to the IDOE’s revocation of the mentor requirement. The majority of the respondents (n = 64, 57.1%) indicated that they had not or did not plan to change their assignment of mentors to novice teachers due to the recent budget shortfall.
    • What Indiana School Board Members Look for when Hiring a Superintendent

      Orr, Leonard
      The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine whether there are any differences in what school board members look for in the areas of personal characteristics and professional skills when hiring a superintendent. A sample population of school board members who were serving at a school that had an opening for a superintendent during the 2007–2008 school year was used. A survey with 24 questions was e-mailed to school board members. Results from this group indicated that there were no major differences between large school corporations and small school corporations when it came to personal characteristics and professional skills for a superintendent. Likewise there was no large spread between means among rural school corporations and urban/suburban school board members or between school board members who had served on the board four or less years compared to those who served on the board for 5 to 16 years or over 16 years.The results indicated that the school board members had high expectations in every category they were questioned about. The premise was that superintendents should be generalist rather than specialist and that they should be well versed in all areas of superintendency.