• Moderating role of self-monitoring in the presentation of self through display of possessions.

      Burchard, Piotr.T (2012-04-12)
      The literature concerning the nature and presentation of the self is briefly reviewed, and the role of self-monitoring as a moderator in the presentation of self through display of possessions is discussed. It is hypothesized that high self-monitors differ from low self-monitors in the extent to which their private and public living spaces reveal their personality.Photographs of living rooms and bedrooms of 40 homeowners of different living status were collected to serve as stimuli and measure of the homeowner's personality and self-monitoring were taken.The photographs were presented to unacquainted observers who rated the homeowner's personality on the same scale.The correlations and discrepancy scores between the self-reported personality scores and observer's ratings were calculated for high and low self-monitoring homeowners for each living status category.The results, although partially consistent with findings of previous research,failed to provide clear support for the proposed and factors that could have influenced the obtained pattern of results are discussed.Lastly, limitations of the present study are acknowledged, and directions for further research are proposed.
    • Self-Expansion and Couple Possessions: The Representation of The Self and Other in Valued Possessions

      Paniccia, Lindsey (2011-09-20)
      The current study seeks to understand the influence of romantic relationships on identity symbolism, specifically the use of personal possessions as a means of achieving social validation. According to self expansion theory (Aron & Aron, 1986), engaging in a romantic relationship alters one’s sense of self; romantic partners take on the qualities and characteristics of a partner and integrate them into the self. To understand the process of identity symbolism due to one’s newly expanded sense of self, this study investigated the link between the amount of reported self-expansion and couple representativeness as well as the function of one’s possessions (other-direct identity claim, self-directed identity claim, feeling regulator, and utility). Participants were asked to read a vignette in which they were told their home had been destroyed by a tornado and were then asked to list three possessions which they wished to find among the rubble. Results indicated that reported self-expansion is associated with the tendency to choose couple representative possessions as indicators of the self. As hypothesized, couple representativeness was significantly correlated with tendency to use possession as other-directed identity claims (as evidenced in both reported function and placement) and feeling regulators. Additionally, reported couple representativeness was significantly correlated with the tendency to use possessions as self-directed identity claims and for utility. This study provides support for the relationship between self-expansion and the tendency to communicate one’s expanded self to others by means of material possessions as well as the emotional significance tied to such possessions.