• Atalanta: The Exception to Social Normality Presented in the Ancient World

      Brink, Sean C (1847-02-15)
      This thesis is an analysis of two ancient authors: the Greek Apollodorus, and the Latin Ovid, and how they both handle the ancient views of societal gender roles. The two authors write more than one hundred years apart (the 2nd century BCE and the mid-1st century BCE - early 1st century CE respectively), yet the two of them write unique accounts of the myth of Ata-lanta. Atalanta is a heroine of Greek and Roman mythology, and is one of the few examples of strong women that survive to the present day. However, Apollodorus and Ovid portray a very different view of Atalanta (within The Library and The Metamorphoses respectively), and both of them reveal some interesting possibilities of how Atalanta may have been viewed by both an-cient men and women of Greece and Rome.
    • Gentrification and HOPE VI in Chicago: Turning Points and Responses to Economic Crisis

      Sink, Todd; Ceh, Brian (2009-08-26)
      Public housing in Chicago, like many cities nationwide, has a history of poverty, crime, and disinvestments. In 1992 the HOPE VI program was created to change the development path of these neighborhoods. The objective of the program is to deconcentrate poverty and enrich prospects for gentrification and urban renewal in targeted neighborhoods by tearing down and replacing project-based public housing with mixed-income apartments. In the process condominium developments often arise on empty parcels of land that further accelerate neighborhood gentrification. Using data made available under the Home Mortgaged Disclosure Act of 1975 the study investigates gentrification in neighborhoods targeted by HOPE VI policy in Chicago from 1990-2007. We examine the following: (1) the extent to which mortgage financing is improving; (2) if changes vary at the intra-urban scale and; (3) the effect, if any, of the recent foreclosure crisis on areas of poverty and subsidized housing. It is found that housing investment was improving in HOPE VI neighborhoods prior to the foreclosure crisis. In these neighborhoods the rate of growth in housing investment was greater than in non-targeted HOPE VI neighborhoods and Chicago combined. The onset of the foreclosure crisis curtailed housing investment in both targeted and non-targeted HOPE VI neighborhoods. Yet, evidence suggests that targeted neighborhoods were most affected, especially those near the downtown where gentrification is more intense. Furthermore, results show that the intra-urban scale is important to consider in examining gentrification in HOPE VI neighborhoods.
    • Bridging the Gap of Age and Awkwardness: Improving Geriatric Sex Education

      Watson, Anne (2018-05)
      Improving geriatric sex education is not a common thought for many Americans, but with a quickly growing population it may soon become a common topic for discussion. Discomfort, awkwardness, and lack of communication often keep health care providers and physicians from discussing sexual health with their elderly patients. These limitations are significantly impairing physicians and health care providers from educating their patients about their sexual health and addressing any concern the patient might have about their sexuality. Sexual health in geriatrics is a growing concern among many health care fields today as the elderly are participating in risky sexual behaviors but are not using safe sex practices. After collecting research from 28 sources, I have concluded that there are many inadequacies that are preventing quality sexual health education for the elderly by examining the history of sex education, discussing the limitations and barriers of adequate sexual health education, and analyzing the training and education methods being used to improve this elderly sexual health education. There are many ways in which improvement for geriatric sexual health education can occur; from enhanced communication to quality training for geriatric health care providers; but in the end the overall change needed will have to come from our society as a whole. The geriatric population is the fastest growing population in today’s society and soon this population will have new needs and concerns that will have to be addressed by us and future generations.
    • COVID-19 Investigated in Terms of Disparities: An Analysis of the Past, Present, and Future of Public Health in Illinois

      DeBlock, Hannah (2020-12)
      As a relatively new topic, previous literature fails to address the relation of social determinants of health to COVID-19. By combining existing knowledge on previous epidemics, information on the role of social determinants of health, and data on COVID-19, conclusions can be made about the path going forward. Historically, nonpharmacologic interventions such as quarantine periods, face coverings, and social distancing have been used in epidemics such as the Spanish Influenza of 1918-19. In terms of social determinants of health, geographical location, educational level, and income level all play a part in the health of an individual. Rather than emphasizing personal decisions, health policy can be utilized to address social determinants of health and improve healthcare infrastructure across the country. By directing focus towards proactive, public healthcare rather than reactive, medical healthcare – a healthier society can be formed in a post-COVID world.
    • An Examination between Laryngeal Physiology and Parkinson’s Disease: Severity and Treatment

      Pelikan, Jillian (2020-12)
      The purpose of this in-depth literature review is to examine the relationship between laryngeal physiology and Parkinson’s disease in terms of the severity and possible treatment. This research aims to determine the distinct characteristics of Parkinsonian speech and possible causes of these speech deficits. In addition, a specific type of Parkinson’s disease treatment, deep brain stimulation, was explored to determine effectiveness on laryngeal physiological deficits found in Parkinson’s disease patients. Through synthesizing peer reviewed journals and various studies, data was examined in order to take an in-depth look at the unique relationship between laryngeal physiology and Parkinson’s disease. Findings indicated that Parkinsonian speech characteristics include vocal tremors, breathiness, hoarseness, and decreased vocal projection possibly due to bowed vocal folds or incomplete glottal closure. Low frequency deep brain stimulation treatment may serve as a potential resource for mitigating speech and voice deficits, however results are inconclusive.
    • Higher Education Graduation Rates: Problems, Solutions, and History

      Bowen, Anne (2021-05)
      This thesis explores how higher education graduation rates and student matriculation have affected stakeholders such as donors, students, taxpayers, and both government and nongovernment organization as well as the overall education rate in America. The ongoing implication of higher education graduation barriers is critical and impacting students across the United States. This thesis examines multiple higher education graduation disparities, including socio-economic status, academic preparation, and students’ sense of belong. Additionally, this thesis reflects on how specific predisposed risk factors, educational history, and admissions processes affect the overall student matriculation through end-phase graduation. Throughout history, higher education has used academic undermatching, defined as students’ ability to attend colleges that are less academically selective than those, for which they are academically prepared, and affirmative action or better known as the procedures to try to eliminate discrimination. These actions are unjust and lead to declining graduation rates in the United States. The history behind declining graduation rates includes influence from higher education learning commissions, institutional leadership, and stakeholders, resulting in lack of student success and inadequate understanding. Educational outcomes in the United States have been negatively impacted from the results of declining graduation rates, thus advancing studies to discover the significant 4-year graduation rate gap risk factors and how students’ sense of belonging play a role in earning a higher education degree. This thesis also presents the solutions that institutions, government officials, and researchers are working towards and how students themselves are focusing on participating in activities to advance the graduation rate in the United States
    • Nos Non Abolere Ordo Lectionum: The History of the Historic Lectionary as Retained by the Lutheran Church

      Walts, Conner (2021-12)
      The history of the Historic Lectionary from a Lutheran perspective provided great insight into its development and retention in the 21st century. This paper reviews the long history of the Historic Lectionary, previously the lectionary of the Western church, and compares its value in light of recent lectionary developments. This study reveals a Lutheran perspective in light of the lectionary debate in the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod and succinctly sets forth centuries of lectionary history in the West.
    • Cost Structures in American Commercial Banks Under $10 Billion: Trend Analysis with Policy Considerations

      Stucker, Thomas (2021-12)
      Cost structures in the banking have historically been a point of study for economists, but many existing economies of scale studies use highly restricted samples. I compiled quarterly data from 2002-2020 from the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council’s Uniform Bank Performance Report to estimate the relationship between bank size (measured by total assets) and bank overhead (noninterest) expense for US banks under $10 billion in total assets. I included a continuous time trend as well as binary time variables for the 2008 recession period and the post-Dodd-Frank era in a multiple linear regression model. My estimation found statistically significant evidence for economies of scale in banking under asset levels of $1.45 billion, and that overhead costs trended downwards over time with exceptions during the recession and the Dodd-Frank era. Synthesizing these results with contemporary literature reveals how an understanding of bank cost structures can aid regulators in assessing the potential costs and benefits of new banking regulations.
    • Social Inflation: Rising Tides in the Insurance Markets

      Heim, Noah (2021-12)
      Social inflation, despite its relative recency, has been a strong concern for some of the largest insurance carriers in the world. With claims costs increasing across broad markets, especially in casualty markets, insurers are racing to find the reason why. Increased claims costs can result in a number of negative effects on both insurance carriers as well as insurances buyers. Social inflation seems to be a key driver of these increased costs. Doing a deep dive into the validity of this claim and studying some potential causes as well as markets in which social inflation is occurring has led to the discovery of some significant effects on the insurance marketplace as well as some potential solutions to help curb the problem and move past this issue.
    • Determining the Optimal Healthcare System for America: Comparing the Current American and Universal Healthcare Systems

      Kandharkar, Tejas (2021-12)
      U.S. citizens ranked healthcare as the most important issue when it comes to voting (Zieff, 2020). The healthcare system’s importance is evident which is why it is important to determine what healthcare system is optimal for America. I used core indicators to compare the current American healthcare system and universal healthcare system and evaluated them for four key parameters. Based on my analysis, I conclusively determined that the universal healthcare system (Score: 8.23/10) is more optimal than the current American healthcare system (Score: 5.10/10). The American system had a somewhat better quality of care but the universal healthcare system was vastly better at limiting disparities in healthcare. I support research into further optimizing the universal healthcare system specifically for America to eventually adopt universal healthcare in the USA.
    • My Way or the Highway: The Development and Use of Behavior Management and School Discipline

      Thomas, Patricia
      Behavior management is a crucial topic in education. The management of student behavior in a classroom can affect the entire learning experience. As the needs of students and teachers change, the methods of behavior management adapt to accommodate new needs. This thesis identifies behavior management starting in the 1960’s and research determining its effectiveness. The causes of change in classroom and school-wide discipline systems are addressed, including political climates, court involvement, and tragic events within schools. The behavior management methods used in the current day are discussed. Through a review of literature and online sources, the information provided was gathered and analyzed. Little empirical research existed backing any of the topics discussed. Individual classroom and school-wide behavior plans were not often supported with data. Rather, personal opinions of teachers and administrators made up the majority of information regarding success or failure of these systems. An increase in empirical data gathered in research settings is needed to fully determine the effectiveness of behavior management methods used in classrooms and school-wide. Teacher training in research backed systems is also imperative. Teachers lacking this training struggle to provide students with a positive and effective education.
    • Issues within Nursing Facilities Involving Quality of Care for the Elderly

      Fluhr, Kendal
      The elderly population in the U.S. is growing each and every year. As this population grows, so does the number of senior citizens in need of constant care. Many are put into nursing homes instead of staying with family or receiving in-home care. The issue with this is that far too many nursing facilities do not give high quality care to residents. The goal of this study was to investigate what concerns are common at nursing homes and what can be done to resolve these problems. Based on research studies, articles, statistics, and informational websites, it was found that some of the most common challenges at nursing facilities are inadequate staffing, high turnover rate, abuse, neglect, medication errors, overuse of antipsychotics, and staff that are poorly trained in how to deal with mental impaired residents. There are several ways to alleviate these issues in order to improve quality of care. A large majority of solutions involve improving staff numbers, providing better staff training, and helping build trust between staff members.
    • Transitioning Towards Inclusion: The Quest for Equality at the Collegiate Level

      Patterson, Kade Joseph Lee
      The research inquires into the reception that members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community receive in general, especially transgender people in particular. Different scholars and researchers have pointed out that the states have not legislated adequately or have entirely failed to legislate protection for the rights of transgender people. Other scholars have equally pointed out that there is segregation and discrimination against transgender people at the collegiate level. The research reviews the findings of various scholars who have conducted surveys on the topic. The next standard of the research is a practical investigation done on various respondents to verify the veracity in the previous findings. The general result and outcome of the investigation points towards the same direction as those other researchers have previously. The results are that there is a public hatred and vast discrimination against the transgender population. The survey concludes by providing some recommendations that will eradicate discrimination against people who identify as transgender. Some of the recommendations provided include a departure from focusing on identity towards putting an emphasis on equality and proper monitoring mechanisms that will ensure the laws protecting transgender people are performed verbatim seriatim.
    • E is for Early Intervention: The Importance of Early Intervention Services in Providing Better Outcomes for Children Who Have or Are at Risk for Having a Developmental Delay

      Schuster, Brianna
      The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects that early intervention services have on children who have or are at risk for a developmental delay due to medical or environmental circumstances. Throughout this paper, the following research questions were used as means to guide and provide focus to the paper: Why are early intervention services important in the first few years of life? Who benefits from early intervention services and how are these children affected? and Does early intervention affect the individual long-term? By using a combination of research articles, scientific journals, and data collected from federal research studies regarding early childhood early intervention and the outcomes of children, this paper provides a comprehensive overview of why early intervention services are needed early in life and the true impact of early childhood intervention programs on the lives of children both at the time of intervention and across the lifespan.
    • The Role of Technology in Elementary Schools How has technology taken over?

      Kersey, Alyssa
      Starting in kindergarten, at the age of five, children are beginning to learn with technological gadgets such as iPads and computers. Society today continuously brings technology into as many aspects of life as possible, even in the elementary schools. Educators need to be aware of this rapidly changing culture to keep up with the times as well as their students. Teachers can integrate this technology into their curriculum to help enhance and differentiate learning for their students. Methodologies used in conducting research on this topic consisted of online journals, books, and a survey written up and handed out to actual elementary aged students from ages nine to twelve. The surveys were conducted at a local school in Terre Haute, Indiana with the Title I label. One hundred students completed the surveys for real life feedback of their own technological usage at home and what resources are available to the students in the community. The goal of the conducted research was to determine whether or not the amount of technology in the elementary school classroom benefited the students learning. While gathering data and collecting information, the results all pointed to the success of student learning with hi-tech equipment. Advanced levels of technology used in the classroom correlates to the student success rate along with how successful the child will be. Teachers use laptops and iPads with applications to teach and have their students submit work. However, not all communities have the funds to afford these whimsical tools for their students. The school corporations with higher poverty rates along with the children living in the district are deprived the access of new technology. Educators continuously need to find new and improved ways to incorporate technology into their curriculum to keep their students up with the rest of the nation. Research shows that students with the access to more technology have a higher success rate.
    • The Importance of Being Proactive: Suicide Clusters, Prevention Programs, and Postvention Methods in the High School Setting

      Farmer, Lindsay
      The purpose of this paper is to explain the phenomenon of suicide clustering and suicide contagion in relation to teenagers and the education system and to provide detailed recommendations for both the prevention and postvention of youth suicide in the school system. Due to the prevalence of mental health issues in teenagers, especially depression, it is important for educators to be aware of the risks of youth suicide attempts and completion, as well as the inherent dangers of clustering that may occur. The phenomenon of suicide clustering will be explained, including the methods by which clustering occurs, as well as the risks schools face when a student commits suicide because of the increased chance of a suicide cluster. The common risks and warning signs of suicides, contagion, and clustering will be discussed. Additionally, the risks associated with LGBT and special needs youth will be analyzed in order to suggest proper prevention training for educators of these students. Furthermore, an extensive, threefold prevention program and curriculum that includes school personnel, students, and parents will be analyzed and recommended. Moreover, the use of school-wide risk assessment, a relatively new concept in suicide prevention and intervention, will be explored and recommended. Also, postvention efforts—including the roles of the school corporation and the dangers of glamorizing teen suicide—will be suggested to minimize the risk of contagion and clustering. All of this will be completed through literature review and data collection from peer-reviewed journal articles.
    • Therapeutic Exercises: A Conservative Approach To The Treatment Of Chronic Low Back Pain

      England, Austin
      Chronic low back pain is becoming a worldwide epidemic; millions suffer from this condition every year. Back pain is one of the most frequent reasons cited for patient visits every year. It is the second most reason for days of missed work following the flu. Chronic low back pain is defined as pain persisting in the low back region for greater than three months. This pain may originate from a variety of factors. These factors can include, but are not limited to injury, disease, or different stressors on the body. Pain in the low back region may be felt as sharp, dull, achy, burning, specific, or vague. Due to the complex nature of chronic low back pain and the variety of forms in which it can take place there are a variety of different tools used to diagnose it. Research has determined the best ways to diagnose chronic low back pain, but has still not found the best way to treat chronic low back pain. This literature review will analyze one treatment form for chronic low back pain, therapeutic exercises. The following text states that therapeutic exercises are an effective conservative treatment option for chronic low back pain. The most effective therapeutic exercise approach is one that incorporates exercises from several different methods into the rehabilitation plan.
    • Outbreak: Emergency Room Overcrowding

      Sum, Mary Elizabeth
      A phenomenon referred to as emergency room (ER) overcrowding, which is defined as, “the demand for emergency services exceeds the ability of physicians and nurses to provide quality care within a reasonable time” (Sinclair, 2007), is happening around the world today. This problem causes much grief for the patients trying to receive quality care from the affected hospitals, and therefore hospitals are looking for any solution to solve this problem. The research was conducted by a literary review by utilizing the CINAHL and the Nursing and Allied Health Collection database. It was conducted to discover any evidence of ER overcrowding, the causes of this issue plaguing hospitals all over the globe, and finally to see if other researchers have identified any solutions to solve ER overcrowding. Overall, it was discovered that the solution is not uniform for all hospitals experiencing ER overcrowding. It will take special analysis of the hospitals individually.
    • Prenatal Genetic Testing: An overview of history, advancements, and impacts on health care

      Neumann, Jessica
      The purpose of this research is to study prenatal genetic testing and the advancements that have been made since the human genome project has made the testing process simpler and less invasive. Prenatal genetic testing is a screen or a test that is performed in order to determine if an embryo or fetus has a certain disease or condition before its birth. A variety of different prenatal tests and screens have been studied to evaluate what genetic conditions are screened for and when. The scope of this paper focuses on the historical overview, advancements, patients, tests, and impacts related to prenatal genetic testing. Some questions are presented in the beginning of this paper in order to fully describe and understand prenatal genetic testing and the benefits and issues relating to it. Conclusion: Prenatal genetic testing and screening is available for many diseases, but the typical test screens for only a select number of diseases and conditions.
    • Benefits of Air Transportation vs Ground Transportation in the Medical Field

      Carpenter, Mackenzie
      The risks and benefits of air ambulance transportation is compared yearly to see if the benefits outweigh the risks for patients and healthcare workers. Lifeline, specifically, is the only flight service with no helicopter crashes. They have successfully stabilized and transported the patients to the best hospital where they receive life-saving care. The Indiana State Trauma Care Committee continues to collect data throughout the year to go over certain patient situations and how to better the outcomes or their overall performance. While both air and ground ambulance services are used to transport patients, the patients deemed most critical based on the scene, are flown to the respective hospital. Each of the specific transportation services, they are equipped with the proper tools and equipment to save the patient’s life when necessary. Overall, the statistics are being looked at to improve patient transfers and better the outcomes of survival rates. Physicians and other medical personnel are working to improve their skills and learn from each patient’s case.