• Discovering buried treasure: Teaching strategies for the aging population

      Frey, Susan; Kerico, Juliet (2010-05-13)
      Traditionally community engagement for academic libraries translates as outreach to the academic community. But what are the possibilities when an academic library extends outreach to people not normally defined as university stakeholders? At Indiana State University (ISU), we learned that extending outreach to an untapped population can reap unexpected gains. For the past two years ISU instruction librarians have traveled to a local retirement community to teach computer skills as part of ISU’s Bites & Bytes Program. The initial goal of the program was to benefit the community-at-large by providing these adult learners with therapeutic activity and a social outlet. But we soon realized that these students did not behave like our pupils in the university community. We had to learn to teach to a new population of learners, and because of this our new students were teaching us as much – if not more – than we were teaching them. After networking with experts on campus who work with elders, we learned that our Bites & Bytes students were adopting learning behaviors typical of their age group – behaviors that we were unfamiliar with. So we began to learn, and in so doing we adopted teaching techniques that addressed their unique learning styles. We also began to incorporate some of these newly acquired techniques into our upper division library instruction classes. And realizing that this outreach program could offer our university students opportunity for growth, we then partnered with faculty to open up Bites & Bytes as a field site for students enrolled in a freshman social work course. In this presentation we will trace the evolution of a library community outreach initiative that grew to become part of the university curriculum, review pedagogical approaches that work with elder adult learners, and relate how some of these approaches can be employed to teach undergraduates.
    • Information literacy in the corporate environment: Teaching the scientist, engineer, and business professional. Invited lecture presented to a graduate information literacy class, School of Library and Information Science, Indiana University. Bloomington, Indiana.

      Frey, Susan (2009-07-22)
      Slides to a lecture given to library science graduate students on teaching information literacy in the corporate environment from an academic librarian who had served in industry during her career. Observations on the difference behaviors of expert versus novice researchers, plus disciplinary differences in information seeking behavior are covered.
    • Pedagogical Approaches to Teaching Information Literacy to Elders

      Frey, Susan (2010-05-13)
      For the past three years instruction librarians at Indiana State University have taught information and computer literacy skills at a local retirement community as part of ISU’s Westminster Outreach Program. In teaching this population we soon realized that these learners did not behave like our university students and we had to adopt teaching techniques that addressed their unique learning styles. In this presentation we will review how we implemented and manage the program and examine teaching methods that work well with the elder, adult learner.
    • You say potato and I say …potato? Blending the diverse flavors of literacy into a rewarding teaching experience.

      Frey, Susan; Codispoti, Margit; Evans, Karen (in absentia) (2010-05-13)
      Literacy in libraries has come to mean more than information literacy. Librarians teaching a diverse population respond not only to library users’ research and analytic skills but must also consider the varied qualities each student brings with them into the classroom. Realizing that there are bodies of knowledge, skills, and social practices with which we use the symbol systems of our culture, new definitions are beginning to emerge that recognize a multiplicity of literacies and because of this, recent developments in teaching and learning are changing what literacy means in library instruction. This presentation examines how proficiencies such as cultural literacy, generational literacy, computer literacy, numeral literacy, scientific literacy and other forms of literacy are explored in the literature including what teaching techniques are being employed to respond to this broadened view of literacy. Included in the presentation are real-life examples of how two academic institutions in Indiana are embracing different domains of literacy to teach diverse groups of students including high achievers, at-risk freshmen, international students, and the elder community.