• African American Newspapers: A bibliography

      McGiverin, Rolland (2020-01-01)
      Bibliography of African American newspapers with information to help access the publication.
    • Alban Berg's Violin Concerto: A Short History of its Reception

      Canfield, Nathan
      Since its world premiere in 1936, Alban Berg's Violin Conce1io has retained a stable place in the repertoire, an unusual feat for a work based on twelve-tone principles. It is all the more remarkable to note its early success despite unfavorable conditions surround ing its first performances. Though Berg (1885-1 935) had already been recognized for his compositions internationally, this work (perhaps along with the event of his death before the premiere) accelerated his worldwide recognition as an important contributor and innovator of contemporary music. Today it is viewed as the composer's most popular work, combi ning serialism with Mahlerian romanticism. As a whole, the Violin Concerto deviates from Berg's usual style in a number of areas, including genre, form, and tonal organization, as well as the inspiration and motives for accepting its commission. While its emotionally-charged program and romantic approach assuredly contributed toward its early success, it is d ifficult neve1iheless to justify its popularity as a work that seems to devote itself to pacifying twelve-tone technique. Throughout this essay I will examine various historic critical evaluations of the work and argue why it has been publicly well-received in spite of its predominant, idiosyncratic use of serial techniques. I will focus primarily on its first three performances along with their reception and compare these initial reactions with more recent viewpoints.
    • The Almost Promised Land: The Opposition to and Veto of the Agricultural College Act of 1857

      Harpool, Robert L.
      In 1857, Representative Justin Morrill put forth before the House of Representatives an act “Donating public lands to the several States and Territories which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts”. A different iteration of the bill would pass 5 years later, in 1862, under President Lincoln. The latter version would incubate what would become known as land-grant universities whose members would occupy significant positions in the landscape of higher education. The bill in 1857, however, barely passed through both houses of Congress though, and President Buchanan, a supporter of higher education, soundly vetoed it. Many scholars state the defeat of the bill was rooted in Southern opposition on the grounds of constitutionality and states’ rights. This one-dimensional view is an unjust labeling of the South as obstructionists for the sake of convenient curriculum. By making the conclusion the premise, numerous inherent issues such as why an agrarian South would oppose an agricultural bill are overlooked. In reality the veto of the agricultural college land act of 1857 was a result of a competitive interaction between numerous complex interests unbounded by the sectional rivalries of the time. If there is a common theme amongst the interests in opposition to the bill it is not sectionalism or ideology, it is finance.
    • American Newspapers

      McGiverin, Rolland (2020-09-01)
      A bibliography of historic American newspapers in the ISU collection.
    • An Exploratory Analysis of the Relationship between Teleconnections and Selected Pollution Parameters

      Hardin, Steven (2011-09-09)
      The relationship between atmospheric circulation patterns, as represented by teleconnection indices, and selected air pollutants was investigated. Correlations were run for levels of three air pollutants: particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter (PM10), ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2); and three atmospheric teleconnection indices: the Multivariate El Niño-Southern Oscillation Index (MEI), the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Pollutant levels were observed at stations in or near 15 North American cities between 1970 and 2004. Significant correlations as strong as .386 were found for selected individual cities and counties when dates were restricted to the months with the highest pollution levels. Correlation strength generally declined as coverage areas and date ranges were expanded. Still, statistically significant, albeit weak, correlations were found in many cases.
    • ASIS&T 2014 Annual Meeting Summary

      Hardin, Steve (2015-07-06)
      Summary of several sessions of the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science & Technology.
    • Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Preschool-Aged Children: A Critical Review

      Anastasiadis, Will
      Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by core symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). ADHD is a fairly common psychopathology diagnosed in childhood (Kooij et al., 2010; Perou et al., 2013). For instance, a recent study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that approximately 6.1 million (9.4%) U.S. children and adolescents between the ages of 2 and 17 have received an ADHD diagnosis; these prevalence estimates were acquired from a collection of 2016 parent-reported ADHD diagnoses (Danielson et al., 2018). Of those patients diagnosed with ADHD, a weighted estimate of 2.4% (388,000) were between the ages of 2 and 5 (i.e., toddlers and preschool-aged children). Although ADHD was found to be proportionally greater in older school-aged children, there is ongoing controversy surrounding the contemporary diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in preschool-aged children (e.g., Harpin, 2005; Layton, Barnett, Hicks, & Jena, 2018), generating various economic, mental and public health concerns (Zhao et al., 2019). Misdiagnosis and undertreatment of ADHD are serious burdens for young children at risk, as lack of preventive treatment may ensue long-lasting effects (Harpin, 2005; Upshur, Wenz-Gross, & Reed 2009). Regrettably, prior research also suggests that differentiating ADHD from normative behavior in preschool-aged children is challenging for clinicians (Ford-Jones, 2015). Thus, the purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent research regarding ADHD, with a particular emphasis on the etiology and treatment of preschool-aged children. In writing this review, the author hopes to provide practitioners and clinical scientists clarity in this fairly contentious area in the ADHD literature.
    • Autism Social Skills Group Proposal

      Thames, Anna
      The topic chosen for the group proposal was social skills group interventions for children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Epp (2008) defines ASDs as “a broad range of disorders characterized by interference with communication and social interactions and circular patterns of interest, activities, and behaviors” (p. 27). Children with ASDs frequently have deficits in the development of social skills and have significantly fewer social interactions with peers than typically developing children (DeRosier, Swick, Davis, McMillen, & Matthews, 2011). In 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that one in 110 children is affected by an ASD in the United States. The increased prevalence of autism and the impairments in social functioning that characterized this disorder provide the rationale for this group. Social skills play an important role in an individual’s ability to form social relationships and function effectively in daily life (Epp, 2008). Yalom (2005) stated that “the need to be closely related to others is as basic as any biological need” (p. 21). Children with autism suffer from deficits in their interpersonal and social skills, but also need social bonds just as any typical developing child does. As Yalom (2005) discussed, maladaptive interpersonal skills can be identified and corrected through psychoeducation, role-play, and skills training in group settings. The deficits in interpersonal and social relationships that children with autism experience can be augmented through social skills training in a group setting.
    • Bakerman Student Research Awards 2010 Guidelines

      Indiana State University, Library
      The purpose of the awards is to recognize excellence in undergraduate and graduate research papers that incorporate exceptional skill and creativity in the application of the services, resources, and collections of the ISU Library and that demonstrate information literacy skills on the part of the student researcher.
    • The Bare Minimum: A Shift Leader’s Perspective on Minimum Wage in the Fast-Food Industry

      Ford, Carey
      Despite growing evidence that the recession has ended and the economic recovery has started, over 50 percent of fast-food workers have to rely on government assistance in order to survive. This is influenced by several factors: a stagnant minimum wage, a workforce that is both older and more skilled than before, and the low-wage employers’ reliance on a flawed system in order to bring more profit. Reviewing research both before (1970 to 2007) and after (2009 to October 2013) the recession of 2008 has yielded two different views of the low-wage industries, and despite some obvious differences, both data sets agree that the minimum wage is not enough to support a family alone. I will be discussing several theories presented in my research on how to help the “working poor” attain a satisfying “living wage,” including “indexing” the minimum wage, wage as a percentage of average wage, and the use of a program known as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).
    • BD Owens Library Virtual Tour 1.10.14

      Blevens, Cheryl (2014-01-14)
      The staff of Cunningham Memorial Library’s Public Services Department is currently engaged in exploring the implementation of a “combined services” model wherein the Reference “Ask” desk and the Circulation Desk would be combined into a single service point. A useful part of the investigative process is being able to consult with libraries who already employ this model. One such library is the B. D. Owens Library at Northwest Missouri State University. Two of the Reference Librarians toured this institute and prepared the following PowerPoint for sharing with their colleagues.
    • Books to add to your flag library

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2014)
      Bibliography of digitized public domain sources related to flags.
    • Bowling Alone in the Library: Building Social Capital on Campus

      Frey, Susan; Codispoti, Margit (2010-05-22)
      In 2007 the authors read a paper at PCA/ACA exploring the library-as-place movement through the lens of sociologist Ray Oldenburg’s third-place concept, and posited that the academic library can be redefined as a third-place for the campus and surrounding communities. Related to the third-place concept is Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, written by Harvard Professor of Public Policy, Robert Putnam. In this work Putnam provides extensive and compelling statistical evidence supporting his claim that social capital is critical in enabling communities to work together to address shared and individual goals. Putnam demonstrates that communities with high social capital are better educated, healthier, vote more, are more altruistic, and more prosperous than those with weaker social networks. In this thought-piece the authors revisit Oldenburg’s third-place concept using Putnam’s construct to explore how the academic library can conceptualize a methodology of establishing social capital on campus to convincingly advocate for their library and compete for diminishing campus resources.
    • British Collection: Bibliography of Dictionaries and Lexicographic Tools

      McGiverin, Rolland (2020-09-01)
      Bibliography of Dictionaries and Lex9icographic Tools
    • Common Bonds

      Curry, Laurie-Ann
      A January 2009 Pew poll shows that from January 2008 to January 2009 there was a decline of our belief in, and concern about, climate change, global warming and their implications. This paper looks at climate change, global warming, environmental degradation and over-population as factors that are inseparable due to the feedback loop that is generated by the common bonds they have and that a change in the balance of one can, and often does, escalate the others in a non-linear fashion. These issues have become so politicized that it is nearly impossible for the science on these four problems to speak for itself with the public. Many of the debates that surround climate change and global warming overlook the glaring reality that there are millions of years of “proof” that climate change has, is and will continue to occur as long as our planet and its sun exist. The arguments disallowing climate change, global warming, environmental degradation and the refugees they are and will continue to engender allows us to shroud the even darker and equally dangerous issue of an over-populated planet that cannot possibly sustain its current population, let alone future growth of that population, with the same robe of disbelief.
    • Connecting Disease with the Enviornment:what can multidisciplinary science do for Epidemiology?

      Jamison, Amanda
      Movement of viruses and microscopic pathogens into new habitat,through accidental introduction or range expansion is of great interest.Studies have begun to examine the potential applications of geospatial technology,while integrating typical ecological components.
    • A Critical Issue: Academic Advising with Attention to Intention

      Mrozinske, Elena
      Student needs in higher education institutions continue to increase each year with intersecting dynamics that are influenced by gender, age, race, external student obligations, financial needs and responsibilities, as well as their varied levels of preparedness upon enrollment (Calderon & Mathies, 2013). In an effort to meet these students’ needs, higher educational institutions are faced with a critical task in determining how to best support students during their educational experiences to increase persistence and timely graduation. In systems of shrinking resources, institutions often use advising as a mode of support for students. How advising is delivered is dependent on how advising is defined structurally, characteristics used in discussions, modality of delivery, and training for all those involved in an effort to meet the purposes as defined by each higher education institution. The structure and implementation of advising often takes a one size fits all approach which falls short of adequately meeting students’ needs. Failure to create an advising system that navigates students through their higher education experience with support and clear benchmarks of measureable success will contribute to attrition, students with excess credits en route to graduation, and student financial risk which in turn leaves higher education institutions vulnerable. This paper explores the emergence of academic advising in higher education as a critical issue including its historical development, an example of advising perceptions at Indiana University Northwest, a review of the current literature that discusses the structural approaches of academic advising from multiple points of view, and what the research supports as necessary for a successful advising approach. Finally, steps that can be taken to address the critical issue of advising at a regional campus will be provided including cost implications.