• Common Bonds

      Curry, Laurie-Ann
      A January 2009 Pew poll shows that from January 2008 to January 2009 there was a decline of our belief in, and concern about, climate change, global warming and their implications. This paper looks at climate change, global warming, environmental degradation and over-population as factors that are inseparable due to the feedback loop that is generated by the common bonds they have and that a change in the balance of one can, and often does, escalate the others in a non-linear fashion. These issues have become so politicized that it is nearly impossible for the science on these four problems to speak for itself with the public. Many of the debates that surround climate change and global warming overlook the glaring reality that there are millions of years of “proof” that climate change has, is and will continue to occur as long as our planet and its sun exist. The arguments disallowing climate change, global warming, environmental degradation and the refugees they are and will continue to engender allows us to shroud the even darker and equally dangerous issue of an over-populated planet that cannot possibly sustain its current population, let alone future growth of that population, with the same robe of disbelief.
    • Connecting Disease with the Enviornment:what can multidisciplinary science do for Epidemiology?

      Jamison, Amanda
      Movement of viruses and microscopic pathogens into new habitat,through accidental introduction or range expansion is of great interest.Studies have begun to examine the potential applications of geospatial technology,while integrating typical ecological components.
    • A Critical Issue: Academic Advising with Attention to Intention

      Mrozinske, Elena
      Student needs in higher education institutions continue to increase each year with intersecting dynamics that are influenced by gender, age, race, external student obligations, financial needs and responsibilities, as well as their varied levels of preparedness upon enrollment (Calderon & Mathies, 2013). In an effort to meet these students’ needs, higher educational institutions are faced with a critical task in determining how to best support students during their educational experiences to increase persistence and timely graduation. In systems of shrinking resources, institutions often use advising as a mode of support for students. How advising is delivered is dependent on how advising is defined structurally, characteristics used in discussions, modality of delivery, and training for all those involved in an effort to meet the purposes as defined by each higher education institution. The structure and implementation of advising often takes a one size fits all approach which falls short of adequately meeting students’ needs. Failure to create an advising system that navigates students through their higher education experience with support and clear benchmarks of measureable success will contribute to attrition, students with excess credits en route to graduation, and student financial risk which in turn leaves higher education institutions vulnerable. This paper explores the emergence of academic advising in higher education as a critical issue including its historical development, an example of advising perceptions at Indiana University Northwest, a review of the current literature that discusses the structural approaches of academic advising from multiple points of view, and what the research supports as necessary for a successful advising approach. Finally, steps that can be taken to address the critical issue of advising at a regional campus will be provided including cost implications.
    • Data Curation at Indiana State University: Investing in and Advancing the Future of Research

      Siddell, Kayla (2015-07-21)
      This presentation discusses the role of data curation at Indiana State University.
    • Digital Initiative Services and Sycamore Scholars

      Siddell, Kayla (2017-11-29)
      This presentation teaches about Digital Initiatives and Sycamore Scholars.
    • Digital Primary Resources for Women’s Studies Students, Scholars and Potential Contributors

      Miller, Marsha (2014-10-09)
      Marsha Miller, Librarian, Cunningham Memorial Library, will present some initial findings and thoughts about how women’s studies scholars and students are (or are not) taking advantage of digital archives, including two that are very close to home. Are digital repositories providing lesson plans and other educational resources to help teachers utilize their materials? What are librarians doing to link this all together?
    • Discovering buried treasure: Teaching strategies for the aging population

      Frey, Susan; Kerico, Juliet (2010-05-13)
      Traditionally community engagement for academic libraries translates as outreach to the academic community. But what are the possibilities when an academic library extends outreach to people not normally defined as university stakeholders? At Indiana State University (ISU), we learned that extending outreach to an untapped population can reap unexpected gains. For the past two years ISU instruction librarians have traveled to a local retirement community to teach computer skills as part of ISU’s Bites & Bytes Program. The initial goal of the program was to benefit the community-at-large by providing these adult learners with therapeutic activity and a social outlet. But we soon realized that these students did not behave like our pupils in the university community. We had to learn to teach to a new population of learners, and because of this our new students were teaching us as much – if not more – than we were teaching them. After networking with experts on campus who work with elders, we learned that our Bites & Bytes students were adopting learning behaviors typical of their age group – behaviors that we were unfamiliar with. So we began to learn, and in so doing we adopted teaching techniques that addressed their unique learning styles. We also began to incorporate some of these newly acquired techniques into our upper division library instruction classes. And realizing that this outreach program could offer our university students opportunity for growth, we then partnered with faculty to open up Bites & Bytes as a field site for students enrolled in a freshman social work course. In this presentation we will trace the evolution of a library community outreach initiative that grew to become part of the university curriculum, review pedagogical approaches that work with elder adult learners, and relate how some of these approaches can be employed to teach undergraduates.
    • Effect of Adolescent Cell Phone Use on Independence

      Mang, Kendra M.
      Although there is research that examines cell phone use and college students, this study investigated high school student cell phone use and its effect on adolescent independence. Fourteen high school students were asked a variety of questions that determined the participants’ characteristics, cell phone usage, contact with parents, and effect of cell phone on curfew, schedule, problem solving, and decision making. Overall, the study concluded that both parents and adolescents preferred to communicate by text messaging. Parents were slightly more likely to initiate contact with their adolescent children. Girls were more likely to contact their parents for advice with a dating or friendship conflict while boys were more likely to contact their parents when a school-related problem arose. Overall, boys considered themselves more independent from their parents than girls. These results both support and extend previous research.
    • English Newspapers at Indiana State University

      McGiverin, Rolland (2020-09-01)
      Bibliography of historic English newspapers at ISU.
    • Ethical Considerations for Sedation of Terminal Wean Patients

      Livingston, Laura
      The purpose of this paper is to examine the ethical concerns involved with the sedation of a terminal wean patient. Terminal weaning is the process of removing a patient from a ventilator (a form of life support) by removing the endotracheal tube. Prior to this procedure, the determination has been made that the patient has either a terminal illness and will not recover or will have to remain on life support to sustain life (Keene, Samples, Masini, & Byington, 2006). The determination to remove a patient from the ventilator is usually one made between the health care team, family member or surrogate, and ideally the patient themselves. Treatment focus switches from the cure of disease to comfort care at the end of life. Death can cause unbearable distress and suffering for a patient. Dyspnea, feelings of suffocation, severe fatigue, nausea, vomiting, anxiety, delirium, intractable pain, and incontinence are several of the issues a dying patient may experience (Tomko & Maxwell, 1999). Despite all efforts to comfort the patient with analgesics, anxiolytics, family support or spiritual services, the patient may continue to suffer. Palliative sedation is used to decrease the level of consciousness in these patients and to help relieve their distress and suffering (Van Wijlick, 2011). Prior to the removal of the endotracheal tube for a terminal weaning process, a patient who has been living on ventilator support may already be receiving sedatives to keep him or her comfortable. A major ethical consideration in using palliative sedation is the determination that it is different from physician-assisted suicide or euthanasia (Belgrave & Requena, 2012).
    • An ethnography of student behavior in secluded and open spaces: Preliminary findings and implications for library space planning

      Bulick, Natalie; Frey, Susan
      From: Bulick, N. & Frey, S. (2019). An ethnography of student behavior in secluded and open spaces: Preliminary findings and implications for library space planning. In A. Katsirikou (Ed.), Book of abstracts: 11th Qualitative and quantitation methods in libraries QQML 2019 international conference (pp. 189-190). Maryville, Florence, Italy: International Society for the Advancement of Science and Technology. file:///C:/Users/sfrey/Desktop/Book-of-Abstracts_Final_AfterConf_v1.pdf The design of physical space in academic libraries has become an increasingly important focus of concern in serving the diverse needs of contemporary student populations. Responding to trends that shift the focus of library space away from collections-centered to more user-centered design, many are exploring ways of creating a better library user experience. To achieve this aim, valuable research has been conducted by directly asking students to articulate their wants and needs via surveys, and in some cases, interviews. However, little research has been devoted to the systematic field observation of how students’ use library spaces. Even less of this research has synthesized data findings with robust theoretical frameworks. This poster details the preliminary findings of an ethnographic study at a four-year, public university. Researchers designed a protocol to observe students in freely available secluded and non-secluded library spaces to examine behavior, communication, and social interaction within the context of proxemics theory. The anthropological study of proxemics is useful in evaluating how people behave within immediate organizations of space, and has been successfully applied to the design of public and semi-public spaces. Attendees will learn of study findings, and how these data can be applied to practical applications such as furniture composition and layout, lighting, and general space planning. Also addressed are details of the next phase of this study. Keywords: Space/Buildings; Organizational Change; Proxemics
    • An Examination between Laryngeal Physiology and Parkinson’s Disease: Severity and Treatment

      Pelikan, Jillian
      The purpose of this in-depth literature review is to examine the relationship between laryngeal physiology and Parkinson’s disease in terms of the severity and possible treatment. This research aims to determine the distinct characteristics of Parkinsonian speech and possible causes of these speech deficits. In addition, a specific type of Parkinson’s disease treatment, deep brain stimulation, was explored to determine effectiveness on laryngeal physiological deficits found in Parkinson’s disease patients. Through synthesizing peer reviewed journals and various studies, data was examined in order to take an in-depth look at the unique relationship between laryngeal physiology and Parkinson’s disease. Findings indicated that Parkinsonian speech characteristics include vocal tremors, breathiness, hoarseness, and decreased vocal projection possibly due to bowed vocal folds or incomplete glottal closure. Low frequency deep brain stimulation treatment may serve as a potential resource for mitigating speech and voice deficits, however results are inconclusive.
    • February 25, 1960: Stories of Inspiration, Risk, and the Fight for Freedom

      Harlow, Laura
      The purpose of this paper is to explore the February 25, 1960 sit-in at the Montgomery Courthouse involving students from Alabama State College. Existing literature focuses on the outcome of the sit-in, most notably the Dixon v. Alabama (1960) case establishing due process rights for students in higher education. Research is limited charting the sit-in’s inception, organization and execution from a student lens. Through primary source interviews, this paper tells the story of two crucial leaders involved with the sit-in. Further, it identifies how the climate of the institution and local community influenced the student experience. This paper invites higher education administrators and faculty to think critically about how they can create environments of inclusion for our underrepresented student populations when faced with political power and chaos.
    • Flags of Africa

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2016-10-01)
    • Flags of Asia

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2017-05-02)
    • Flags of Europe

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2016)
    • Flags of North America

      Rolland, McGiverin (Indiana State University, 2017)