• Effect of Adolescent Cell Phone Use on Independence

      Mang, Kendra M.
      Although there is research that examines cell phone use and college students, this study investigated high school student cell phone use and its effect on adolescent independence. Fourteen high school students were asked a variety of questions that determined the participants’ characteristics, cell phone usage, contact with parents, and effect of cell phone on curfew, schedule, problem solving, and decision making. Overall, the study concluded that both parents and adolescents preferred to communicate by text messaging. Parents were slightly more likely to initiate contact with their adolescent children. Girls were more likely to contact their parents for advice with a dating or friendship conflict while boys were more likely to contact their parents when a school-related problem arose. Overall, boys considered themselves more independent from their parents than girls. These results both support and extend previous research.
    • English Newspapers at Indiana State University

      McGiverin, Rolland (2020-09-01)
      Bibliography of historic English newspapers at ISU.
    • Ethical Considerations for Sedation of Terminal Wean Patients

      Livingston, Laura
      The purpose of this paper is to examine the ethical concerns involved with the sedation of a terminal wean patient. Terminal weaning is the process of removing a patient from a ventilator (a form of life support) by removing the endotracheal tube. Prior to this procedure, the determination has been made that the patient has either a terminal illness and will not recover or will have to remain on life support to sustain life (Keene, Samples, Masini, & Byington, 2006). The determination to remove a patient from the ventilator is usually one made between the health care team, family member or surrogate, and ideally the patient themselves. Treatment focus switches from the cure of disease to comfort care at the end of life. Death can cause unbearable distress and suffering for a patient. Dyspnea, feelings of suffocation, severe fatigue, nausea, vomiting, anxiety, delirium, intractable pain, and incontinence are several of the issues a dying patient may experience (Tomko & Maxwell, 1999). Despite all efforts to comfort the patient with analgesics, anxiolytics, family support or spiritual services, the patient may continue to suffer. Palliative sedation is used to decrease the level of consciousness in these patients and to help relieve their distress and suffering (Van Wijlick, 2011). Prior to the removal of the endotracheal tube for a terminal weaning process, a patient who has been living on ventilator support may already be receiving sedatives to keep him or her comfortable. A major ethical consideration in using palliative sedation is the determination that it is different from physician-assisted suicide or euthanasia (Belgrave & Requena, 2012).
    • An ethnography of student behavior in secluded and open spaces: Preliminary findings and implications for library space planning

      Bulick, Natalie; Frey, Susan
      From: Bulick, N. & Frey, S. (2019). An ethnography of student behavior in secluded and open spaces: Preliminary findings and implications for library space planning. In A. Katsirikou (Ed.), Book of abstracts: 11th Qualitative and quantitation methods in libraries QQML 2019 international conference (pp. 189-190). Maryville, Florence, Italy: International Society for the Advancement of Science and Technology. file:///C:/Users/sfrey/Desktop/Book-of-Abstracts_Final_AfterConf_v1.pdf The design of physical space in academic libraries has become an increasingly important focus of concern in serving the diverse needs of contemporary student populations. Responding to trends that shift the focus of library space away from collections-centered to more user-centered design, many are exploring ways of creating a better library user experience. To achieve this aim, valuable research has been conducted by directly asking students to articulate their wants and needs via surveys, and in some cases, interviews. However, little research has been devoted to the systematic field observation of how students’ use library spaces. Even less of this research has synthesized data findings with robust theoretical frameworks. This poster details the preliminary findings of an ethnographic study at a four-year, public university. Researchers designed a protocol to observe students in freely available secluded and non-secluded library spaces to examine behavior, communication, and social interaction within the context of proxemics theory. The anthropological study of proxemics is useful in evaluating how people behave within immediate organizations of space, and has been successfully applied to the design of public and semi-public spaces. Attendees will learn of study findings, and how these data can be applied to practical applications such as furniture composition and layout, lighting, and general space planning. Also addressed are details of the next phase of this study. Keywords: Space/Buildings; Organizational Change; Proxemics
    • An Examination between Laryngeal Physiology and Parkinson’s Disease: Severity and Treatment

      Pelikan, Jillian
      The purpose of this in-depth literature review is to examine the relationship between laryngeal physiology and Parkinson’s disease in terms of the severity and possible treatment. This research aims to determine the distinct characteristics of Parkinsonian speech and possible causes of these speech deficits. In addition, a specific type of Parkinson’s disease treatment, deep brain stimulation, was explored to determine effectiveness on laryngeal physiological deficits found in Parkinson’s disease patients. Through synthesizing peer reviewed journals and various studies, data was examined in order to take an in-depth look at the unique relationship between laryngeal physiology and Parkinson’s disease. Findings indicated that Parkinsonian speech characteristics include vocal tremors, breathiness, hoarseness, and decreased vocal projection possibly due to bowed vocal folds or incomplete glottal closure. Low frequency deep brain stimulation treatment may serve as a potential resource for mitigating speech and voice deficits, however results are inconclusive.
    • February 25, 1960: Stories of Inspiration, Risk, and the Fight for Freedom

      Harlow, Laura
      The purpose of this paper is to explore the February 25, 1960 sit-in at the Montgomery Courthouse involving students from Alabama State College. Existing literature focuses on the outcome of the sit-in, most notably the Dixon v. Alabama (1960) case establishing due process rights for students in higher education. Research is limited charting the sit-in’s inception, organization and execution from a student lens. Through primary source interviews, this paper tells the story of two crucial leaders involved with the sit-in. Further, it identifies how the climate of the institution and local community influenced the student experience. This paper invites higher education administrators and faculty to think critically about how they can create environments of inclusion for our underrepresented student populations when faced with political power and chaos.
    • Flags of Africa

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2016-10-01)
    • Flags of Asia

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2017-05-02)
    • Flags of Europe

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2016)
    • Flags of North America

      Rolland, McGiverin (Indiana State University, 2017)
    • Flags of Oceania

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2016-01-01)
    • Flags of South America

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2016)
    • The Food Pyramid: Mexicans, Agribusiness, Governments and Communities in the Midwest Migrant Stream

      Sutrina-Haney, Katie (Northern Illinois University, 2016-05)
      As recent scholarship and even popular works and documentaries demonstrate, the United States public is largely unaware how our food ends up on our table. While some popular works found in bookstores explore where our food comes from, these works rarely analyze the role of labor and specifically the system of the migrant farmworker stream. Workers in the field make possible the complex process from the growth of produce to the selling of food to consumers. By the 1960s, communities and states in the Midwest reacted to editorialized and documented condemnation of the living and working conditions of migrant farmworkers as seen in films like Harvest of Shame, as well as national concerns over the civil rights of minorities. In analyzing the migrant stream of the Midwest before the international and national changes of the North American Free Trade Agreement signed in 1993, this work expands upon a part of the migrant experience that is rarely detailed. While national factors influenced the structure of the migrant stream in the Midwest, this study argues that the crops, communities, and corporations of the Midwest migrant stream also played a distinctive role in the national story of the migrant stream. In analyzing the structure of power in the Midwest migrant stream through the roles of farmworker families, national and state governments, growers, farmworker unions, agribusinesses, and Catholic organizations, this dissertation enhances our understanding of the Midwest through the lens of gender, resistance, manipulation, agency, communities, and control. Specifically focusing on the Mexican migrant farmworkers who came primarily from Texas, Florida, and Mexico to the Midwest states of Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, Minnesota, and Indiana as laborers during the 1960s to 1993, my dissertation explores the importance of gender, governments, agribusinesses, farmers, and migrants in shaping the Midwest migrant stream.
    • From Storehouse to Clubhouse: Collection Management in the Library as Place

      Frey, Susan; Codispot, Margit (2010-05-13)
      For the past two decades people have been responding to profound societal changes brought about by the increasing digitization of information and the ubiquity of the internet. Believing that all information is mobile and stressed by shrinking budgets, administrators and policy makers are beginning to consider closing libraries in favor of offering a suite of online services. In response to this challenge to demonstrate the relevancy of the library proper in an increasingly digitized world, the library as place movement has emerged. Many libraries have adopted new models of service that have transformed library space into a place for social gathering and community engagement. Mirroring this phenomenon, traditional collection management practices in libraries are being re-evaluated. This presentation examines the changing collection management practices at two public, Indiana universities. At Indiana State University (ISU) and Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) how the collection is developed, preserved, displayed, weeded, and circulated has transformed in response to the new demands of the library as place. Included in the presentation are practical, real-world examples of collection management practices that maintain the traditional role of the library as the preserver of our culture, while adopting the new role of a vibrant community center.
    • Group Proposal

      McCarthy, Francesca
      Throughout my entire athletic career, spanning from the ages of 6 to 22, I heard coaches talking about mental toughness. Mental toughness was much more than playing your hardest when you were tired or pushing yourself to do extra shooting drills after practice. What I learned was that mental toughness meant avoiding the trainer when you were hurt, hiding injuries that could keep you from playing, and continuing to play no matter how your body was feeling. This attitude permeates athletic culture. Athletes are trained from the beginning of their careers to bury anything that could prevent them from being able to participate. That philosophy bleeds into other parts of their lives, including mental health. Breaking into this population to better understand the variety of difficulties they face can be complicated because of athletes’ tendency to underreport symptoms (Martinsen & Sundgot-Borgen, 2013). Along with the years of physical training, they have also been psychologically trained to mask their pain. Due to this training, it is important for athletes to receive the mental health care that they need. College athletes are especially at risk. There is a tremendous amount of pressure on college athletes to play through any difficulties, because their tuition often relies on their performance. Along with this pressure, their transition out of sports can be incredibly difficult. After retirement from athletics, athletes may experience identity crisis, loss of self-worth, decrease in self-esteem, decline of life satisfaction, emotional problems, alcohol and drug abuse, problems building new relationships, occupational troubles, and physical difficulties such as injuries and dietary problems (Erpic, Wylleman, & Zupancic, 2004). The development of group therapy services for college athletes who have completed their final season of college athletics and who are preparing to graduate from college would be beneficial for athletes in any sport. These services would be available to the athletes throughout their transition out of sports. The group would focus on the difficulties traditionally experienced by athletes going through this challenging transition. Taking advantage of their years of athletic training, the group services would be stylized like a typical athletic practice.
    • The Hine Bibliography of Resources on Servant Leadership

      Muyumba, Valentine; Hine, Betsy N. (2015-09)
    • The Hine Bibliography of Resources on Servant Leadership

      Muyumba, Valentine; Hine, Betsy N. (2015-09)
    • I Am the Databank: Humanity as Archive in Three Dystopian Films

      Frey, Susan (2010-05-27)
      Archives, as repositories of information related to a person or community, can reveal much about a society’s character. As repositories of select information, archives serve an important social function. Since the information they contain is ‘worth knowing’ they are enculturative. In dystopian societies exploitation of the people is often achieved by controlling information. What data is collected, how and where it is stored, how and by whom it is managed and disseminated, and how it is officially interpreted figures largely in issues of propaganda, censorship, and privacy. Our data can become so internalized into our collective consciousness that we often interpret ourselves as artifacts of information, such as when our body art (i.e. tattoos) tells our personal story. In fiction we push this concept to the point that the human body becomes a literal archive. In Fahrenheit 451 (1966), Johnny Mnemonic (1995), and The Final Cut (2004) human beings are used as information repositories. Examining what information they preserve is as important as asking why their bodies become archives in their societies. The protagonists in these films attempt to manipulate the societal mechanisms that subjugate and dehumanize the citizenry by taking control of the data that is embedded in their own personhood. This act of rebellion not only serves a political function, but also becomes an act of personal transformation, a search for the nature of truth, and a re-examination of what it is that is ‘worth knowing’. How the characters in these films are alternately damaged and empowered by being turned into human archives is examined in an effort to expose different epistemological models and ways of coping with identity.
    • Identifying Institutional Trends in Collaborative and Interdisciplinary Research Using Bibliometrics

      Youngen, Gregory K. (2013-12-03)
      Research output, in the form of peer-reviewed journal articles, is analyzed to assess the collaborative and interdisciplinary nature of work performed at Indiana State University. Using Thompson-Reuters Web of Knowledge, articles authored by ISU faculty over the past 13 years (2000-2012) were analyzed to identify co-authorships, inter-institutional affiliations and cross-disciplinary collaborations. The resulting data can be used to identify trends in publication, research, and funding. The data may also be used to identify potential areas of research for future endeavors. The methodology employed in this study can be easily applied to other institutions. Methodology: Web of Knowledge (WoK) is an interdisciplinary database of peer-reviewed journal literature that includes enhanced, detailed indexing of articles published in the major journals of most academic disciplines. A search strategy is formulated to identify all the authors from a given institution. For ISU, it was a simple zip code search in the author address field. The search results are downloaded, then imported into an Excel spreadsheet. Each article record includes subject heading, source title, institutional affiliation of the authors, country, and other citation information. The records are then compiled and standardized for uniformity in Excel. Textual analysis tools and visualization tools--including word clouds, maps, and bubble charts-- are employed to clarify the data through illustration. • Tools: ISI Web of Knowledge / Microsoft Excel / Data visualization software • Process: Download and compile an institution’s combined peer-reviewed journal article output for a period of time • Analyze: Co-author data for internal and external collaborations • Identify: Areas of strength as indicated by total publication records • Identify: Subject areas of interdisciplinary research based on author home departments Results: Data analysis identifies trends and varying degrees of interdisciplinary work across most schools and departments at the University. Visualizations are used to compare the disciplines and identify trends over time. The publishing output highlights the differing degrees of collaboration within the disciplines, identifies institutional partnerships, and the subject areas of research output. Conclusions: WoK identifies three broad areas of research: 1) Science/Technology/Medicine (STM); 2) the Social Sciences; and 3) the Arts/Humanities. As might be expected, most inter-institutional and inter-disciplinary collaboration occurs within STM. This is no exception at ISU. Likewise, the Social Sciences mostly collaborate among their related disciplines. The Arts and Humanities have the least amount of interdisciplinary collaboration and co-authorship, but that’s not to say it doesn’t exist. This study found a significant number of papers that were cross identified in at least two broad areas, and a few papers were included in all three.