• Group Proposal

      McCarthy, Francesca
      Throughout my entire athletic career, spanning from the ages of 6 to 22, I heard coaches talking about mental toughness. Mental toughness was much more than playing your hardest when you were tired or pushing yourself to do extra shooting drills after practice. What I learned was that mental toughness meant avoiding the trainer when you were hurt, hiding injuries that could keep you from playing, and continuing to play no matter how your body was feeling. This attitude permeates athletic culture. Athletes are trained from the beginning of their careers to bury anything that could prevent them from being able to participate. That philosophy bleeds into other parts of their lives, including mental health. Breaking into this population to better understand the variety of difficulties they face can be complicated because of athletes’ tendency to underreport symptoms (Martinsen & Sundgot-Borgen, 2013). Along with the years of physical training, they have also been psychologically trained to mask their pain. Due to this training, it is important for athletes to receive the mental health care that they need. College athletes are especially at risk. There is a tremendous amount of pressure on college athletes to play through any difficulties, because their tuition often relies on their performance. Along with this pressure, their transition out of sports can be incredibly difficult. After retirement from athletics, athletes may experience identity crisis, loss of self-worth, decrease in self-esteem, decline of life satisfaction, emotional problems, alcohol and drug abuse, problems building new relationships, occupational troubles, and physical difficulties such as injuries and dietary problems (Erpic, Wylleman, & Zupancic, 2004). The development of group therapy services for college athletes who have completed their final season of college athletics and who are preparing to graduate from college would be beneficial for athletes in any sport. These services would be available to the athletes throughout their transition out of sports. The group would focus on the difficulties traditionally experienced by athletes going through this challenging transition. Taking advantage of their years of athletic training, the group services would be stylized like a typical athletic practice.
    • The Hine Bibliography of Resources on Servant Leadership

      Muyumba, Valentine; Hine, Betsy N. (2015-09)
    • The Hine Bibliography of Resources on Servant Leadership

      Muyumba, Valentine; Hine, Betsy N. (2015-09)
    • I Am the Databank: Humanity as Archive in Three Dystopian Films

      Frey, Susan (2010-05-27)
      Archives, as repositories of information related to a person or community, can reveal much about a society’s character. As repositories of select information, archives serve an important social function. Since the information they contain is ‘worth knowing’ they are enculturative. In dystopian societies exploitation of the people is often achieved by controlling information. What data is collected, how and where it is stored, how and by whom it is managed and disseminated, and how it is officially interpreted figures largely in issues of propaganda, censorship, and privacy. Our data can become so internalized into our collective consciousness that we often interpret ourselves as artifacts of information, such as when our body art (i.e. tattoos) tells our personal story. In fiction we push this concept to the point that the human body becomes a literal archive. In Fahrenheit 451 (1966), Johnny Mnemonic (1995), and The Final Cut (2004) human beings are used as information repositories. Examining what information they preserve is as important as asking why their bodies become archives in their societies. The protagonists in these films attempt to manipulate the societal mechanisms that subjugate and dehumanize the citizenry by taking control of the data that is embedded in their own personhood. This act of rebellion not only serves a political function, but also becomes an act of personal transformation, a search for the nature of truth, and a re-examination of what it is that is ‘worth knowing’. How the characters in these films are alternately damaged and empowered by being turned into human archives is examined in an effort to expose different epistemological models and ways of coping with identity.
    • Identifying Institutional Trends in Collaborative and Interdisciplinary Research Using Bibliometrics

      Youngen, Gregory K. (2013-12-03)
      Research output, in the form of peer-reviewed journal articles, is analyzed to assess the collaborative and interdisciplinary nature of work performed at Indiana State University. Using Thompson-Reuters Web of Knowledge, articles authored by ISU faculty over the past 13 years (2000-2012) were analyzed to identify co-authorships, inter-institutional affiliations and cross-disciplinary collaborations. The resulting data can be used to identify trends in publication, research, and funding. The data may also be used to identify potential areas of research for future endeavors. The methodology employed in this study can be easily applied to other institutions. Methodology: Web of Knowledge (WoK) is an interdisciplinary database of peer-reviewed journal literature that includes enhanced, detailed indexing of articles published in the major journals of most academic disciplines. A search strategy is formulated to identify all the authors from a given institution. For ISU, it was a simple zip code search in the author address field. The search results are downloaded, then imported into an Excel spreadsheet. Each article record includes subject heading, source title, institutional affiliation of the authors, country, and other citation information. The records are then compiled and standardized for uniformity in Excel. Textual analysis tools and visualization tools--including word clouds, maps, and bubble charts-- are employed to clarify the data through illustration. • Tools: ISI Web of Knowledge / Microsoft Excel / Data visualization software • Process: Download and compile an institution’s combined peer-reviewed journal article output for a period of time • Analyze: Co-author data for internal and external collaborations • Identify: Areas of strength as indicated by total publication records • Identify: Subject areas of interdisciplinary research based on author home departments Results: Data analysis identifies trends and varying degrees of interdisciplinary work across most schools and departments at the University. Visualizations are used to compare the disciplines and identify trends over time. The publishing output highlights the differing degrees of collaboration within the disciplines, identifies institutional partnerships, and the subject areas of research output. Conclusions: WoK identifies three broad areas of research: 1) Science/Technology/Medicine (STM); 2) the Social Sciences; and 3) the Arts/Humanities. As might be expected, most inter-institutional and inter-disciplinary collaboration occurs within STM. This is no exception at ISU. Likewise, the Social Sciences mostly collaborate among their related disciplines. The Arts and Humanities have the least amount of interdisciplinary collaboration and co-authorship, but that’s not to say it doesn’t exist. This study found a significant number of papers that were cross identified in at least two broad areas, and a few papers were included in all three.
    • THE IMMEDIATE SUCCESS OF BARTÓK: RECEPTION AND INFLUENCE OF THE CONCERTO FOR ORCHESTRA ON THE REPERTOIRE

      Bess, Adam
      Written in late 1943 and premiered the following winter in 1944, Concerto for Orchestra, Sz 116, BB 123, of Hungarian composer Béla Bartók was immediately regarded as a success by his critics and contemporaries alike. Presented as an entirely new compositional form, unheard before by audiences of the time, the Concerto for Orchestra brought strident fanfares coupled with delicate virtuosity, demanded of all performers of the orchestra. Though its reception was critically acclaimed, the troublesome events of World War II and rise of Socialism occurring alongside the conception and composition of the piece as well as its ground-breaking formal organization warrant closer analysis of the work as a possible anti-dogmatic composition. Drawing influence from the early concerto form, Bartók sought to emulate composers of the past and their emphases of individual performers in virtuosic solo concertos. Many other composers have been allured to the genre and their respective works across musical periods have entered the standard repertoire. However, arguably none have been so dramatic and contrasting as Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra, a five-movement quasi-symphonic work in which each movement features one instrumental section over another, complete with the virtuosic demands composers, performers, and critics have all come to know with the concerto genre. This analyses serves to provide examples and reviews which support the view of Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra as a sans-textbook composition which has since entered the standard orchestral repertoire as a representative of the new compositional attitudes of the 20th century. Additionally, this analyses strives to emphasize the impact of the work on Bartók’s contemporaries, who continue to emulate his techniques in respective compositions. Argumentative support will be garnered by examining personal writings and correspondence of Bartók as well as those of his contemporaries. Additionally, by analyzing score and recording notes as well as performance reviews from contrasting decades, an idea of how receptions and performances of the work have changed can be posited in support of the influence and preeminence of the Concerto for Orchestra as one of the most significant works in the orchestral body literature from the last 100 years.
    • Improving student performance: Embedding your campus library in your online courseware. Poster presented at the eleventh Teaching and Learning with Technology national conference. Lafayette, Indiana.

      Frey, Susan (2009-08-26)
      For faculty teaching online classes requiring research assignments, providing appropriate library support becomes a problem. Many students naively turn to freely available internet resources, such as Google, when working on their assignments. But such tools do not always offer the appropriate scholarly information that they require. To assist students with their research, faculty often counsel them to visit the campus library where the librarian will help them navigate a bewildering array of free and proprietary databases. But providing an equivalent level of personal research support to online students can be challenging. Traditional library services to online learners include access to remote databases, online tutorials, and interlibrary loan. But the presence of the librarian as a concerned and caring guide is often missing in online courses. Research suggests that many faculty believe that integrating library resources and services into their online courseware is a burden. This misconception is usually held by those who are unaware of the types of services available to them. In most universities and colleges throughout the United States and the United Kingdom librarians support faculty with their online teaching by relieving time pressures and assisting in publishing and technology issues. These practices go way beyond inserting a link to the library’s homepage on a course management system, but focus instead on creating student-centered, customized online research experiences that improve student performance. At Indiana State University (ISU), librarians assist faculty in building their Blackboard courses. We perform a variety of functions such as creating customized tutorials and guides, participating in online discussion forums, video conferencing, and providing point-of-need research counseling by monitoring discussions and following class assignment schedules. We strive to become an unobtrusive but accessible presence in the online teaching environment. Experience has shown that our faculty see our services as valuable and time saving, while students express appreciation for our assistance. This poster presentation will provide a brief summary of research into library services in distance education paying particular attention to the concept of the embedded library and student performance. Specific examples of how ISU librarians are assisting faculty with their online teaching will be provided. Attendees will walk away with a greater understanding of what their campus library can do to help them build and manage their online courses.
    • Indian and Irish Newspapers: A bibliography

      McGiverin, Rolland (2020-09-01)
      bibliography of Irish and Indian newspapers in ISU collection.
    • Information literacy in the corporate environment: Teaching the scientist, engineer, and business professional. Invited lecture presented to a graduate information literacy class, School of Library and Information Science, Indiana University. Bloomington, Indiana.

      Frey, Susan (2009-07-22)
      Slides to a lecture given to library science graduate students on teaching information literacy in the corporate environment from an academic librarian who had served in industry during her career. Observations on the difference behaviors of expert versus novice researchers, plus disciplinary differences in information seeking behavior are covered.
    • International Education in the U.S. Through the Prism of Fulbright Program: Historical Analysis

      Kaniuka, Polina
      The scale and speed of global change challenge higher education and other national sectors to internationalize, to have an understanding of the relationship of various nations, including the United States, with the rest of the world, and to realize the importance of the latter. International education plays a prominent role in the shaping of a new global society. However, it seems there has not been enough support from the federal government in regards to the efforts promoting international education in the United States. Many studies touched on the role of the federal government when it comes to the higher education; however, there have not been enough efforts on providing a comprehensive analysis of the United States higher education system’s internationalization and the role of the internal and external factors. This study attempts such an analysis from 1944 to 1975 focused on the federal government support in the context of one highly successful program in the international education – Fulbright’s Amendment to the Surplus Property Act of 1946 (or Fulbright Program). The program was identified for its explicit interest in and continuous support for higher education’s international capacity between 1944 and 1975. This study takes a longitudinal approach to provide the context of the implementation and development of the program under examination during the period of time identified. The study seeks to answer the following questions: 1) how did major historical external and internal events affect the federal support of international education in the USA on the example of the successful program – Fulbright Program? 2) what are the factors that have determined the success of the program? In order to answer those research questions, it was important to research the context of the time and circumstances in which the program was implemented. That is why at first, I attempted to describe internal and external events taking place that shaped the environment of the program under examination. Then, it was imperative to discuss what the program entailed and to show its development overtime in regards to its capacity and scope. Finally, I attempted to analyze the factors that determined its success.
    • An Investigation of Body Image Among NCAA Female Athletes

      Madden, Colleen
      Over the last several decades, body image perceptions of collegiate female athletes have been investigated in the realms of both physical and mental health. The issue has been evaluated from various standpoints including sport type and competition level; however, body image is highly individualized among young women and thus remains an unpredictable challenge with unanswered questions. This comprehensive study includes an extensive literature review of research involving collegiate female athletes and factors that contribute to their body image; additionally, a newly developed survey for female athletes at the NCAA Division I level was administered, and more than 150 responses were analyzed. Four research objectives served as the foundation of this research, targeting the ultimate goal to form conclusions about how body image perceptions function in the lives of collegiate female athletes within the NCAA. The objectives were: first, to define body image as applicable to collegiate female athletes; second, to establish pressures that influence body image; third, to determine how the pressures of collegiate sport differ from the pressures on student non-athletes; and fourth, to assess the relationship between nutritional habits and body image among collegiate female athletes. Upon analysis of literature and the new survey, it was concluded that body image is dependent on many factors such as sport type, division level, and media objectification, but more importantly, the ways that individuals internalize such stimuli. Ultimately, the athletic world contributes to body image concerns and creates a unique pressure that cannot be experienced by non-athletes.
    • Jorge Garcia Highlights 2013 ASIS&T Annual Meeting

      Hardin, Steve (2014-10-10)
      At the 2013 ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Jorge García discussed the transformation of new information technologies from imagined abstractions to reality. Through old and current advertisements and interviews with futurist Arthur C. Clarke and communication theorist Marshall McLuhan, García illustrated the progressive revolutions embodied by the telephone, a shift from commuting to communicating, early visions of the Internet, new media and big data. Handling the change requires a continuous process of abstracting reality, augmenting, assimilating and creating models to represent its key features. García recognized data as an asset to be distilled and classified, stored in expanding volumes and transmitted at astounding speeds. Layered with contextual information and supportive technology, data can be used to enhance human intelligence and capability. García closed with an admonition to limit potential negative effects of technology by implementing clear and ethical practices in data and information use.
    • Life-Course Criminology and Desistance from Crime: What Consists of a Good Marriage and are the Effects Gender Specific?

      Hunter, Shawn P.
      Criminology is the science of studying crime on individual and societal levels. The area of life-course criminology seeks to understand how an individual begins in crime, persists, and eventually desists, and how desistance is achieved throughout the entire course of a person's life. Desistance may be accomplished through a number of ways within the confines of a marriage, from the cultivation of a strong marriage environment with strong attachments and commitments between spouses, to marriage simply functioning as the mechanism to replace one‟s previous deviant friends. While there is a large body of knowledge explaining how desistance is achieve through marriage for men, the literature pertaining to women is very small. In addition to these gendered differences in research, the specific properties of what consists of a “good marriage” are missing from the literature to date.
    • Managing Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETD) Data

      Siddell, Kayla (2017-09-08)
      Where should students store data after they have completed their Electronic Thesis or Dissertation (ETDs)? The MetaArchive Cooperative has created the ETD+ Toolkit as an approach to improving research output management. This session will cover best practices in data curation and digital longevity techniques that will help students and faculty identify and offset risks and threats to their digital research footprints. We will discuss what to do with the data, how to handle copyright, version control, data organization, file formatting and metadata as well as where should these things be stored.
    • The Mau Mau Rebellion

      Miller, Christle
      The colonialization of Africa was long underway by the time the British moved into Kenya in the late 1800s. Rather Africa was opened for colonialization for some time, “the story of pacification and effective occupation of Kenya was no different from what happened all over Britain’s empire at the close of the nineteenth century.” Indeed the occupation of African states had transformed the continent into a hodgepodge of differing colonies. The occupation of spaces as defined by European imperialist created conflict between the indigenous peoples and those sent in to occupy the space and such conflicts were plentiful. The anti-colonial rebellion of the Mau Mau led the British to engage in torture in order to suppress the rebellion. What is not as well known or perhaps what is not well discussed is whether the use of torture was an effective strategy in suppressing the complicated trajectory of this anti-colonial rebellion. This paper will lay the foundation for the conflict between the British and the Mau Mau and will be followed by a discussion of the torture practices employed by the British and whether or not said torture practices were effective.
    • Methods of Murder in Maternal Filicide: An Analysis of Weapon Use and Mode of Death

      Möller, Ami
      Maternal filicide, the murder of a child perpetrated by his or her mother, has been studied in an effort to define the causal factors for such behavior. Less information exists on the type of weapons used by mothers. This paper presents a content analysis of twenty maternal filicide cases collected from various newspapers in an effort to determine the common methods of murder and types of weapons used by the mothers. Findings show that blunt objects are the most frequently used weapon by these offenders. A comparison with previous research of the same faction indicates slightly different weapon use even though demographic results, such as offender age and victim gender, are similar.
    • Night Photo

      Vancil, David E. (2011-08-30)