• Where did the reference desk go? Transforming staff and space to meet user needs.

      LaBella, Carey (Journal of Access Services, 2016)
      A sharp decline in the number of reference queries prompted the library administration at Indiana State University to begin a project to combine the circulation, reference, and IT desks to reduce staffing at a new consolidated service point. All faculty and staff in the reference/instruction and circulation units participated in the project. The new arrangement and subsequent removal of librarians from routine desk duties have expanded instructional opportunities, consistent with the university’s goals. Project participants plan further assessments to better determine the impacts of the new service arrangements.
    • Where did the reference desk go? Transforming staff and space to meet user needs.

      Boehme, Andrea
      A sharp decline in the number of reference queries prompted the library administration at Indiana State University to begin a project to combine the circulation, reference, and IT desks to reduce staffing at a new consolidated service point. All faculty and staff in the reference/instruction and circulation units participated in the project. The new arrangement and subsequent removal of librarians from routine desk duties have expanded instructional opportunities, consistent with the university’s goals. Project participants plan further assessments to better determine the impacts of the new service arrangements.
    • Where did the reference desk go? Transforming staff and space to meet user needs.

      Bunnett, Brian (Journal of Access Services, 2016)
      A sharp decline in the number of reference queries prompted the library administration at Indiana State University to begin a project to combine the circulation, reference, and IT desks to reduce staffing at a new consolidated service point. All faculty and staff in the reference/instruction and circulation units participated in the project. The new arrangement and subsequent removal of librarians from routine desk duties have expanded instructional opportunities, consistent with the university’s goals. Project participants plan further assessments to better determine the impacts of the new service arrangements.
    • Where did the reference desk go? Transforming staff and space to meet user needs.

      Evans, Karen (Journal of Access Services, 2016)
      A sharp decline in the number of reference queries prompted the library administration at Indiana State University to begin a project to combine the circulation, reference, and IT desks to reduce staffing at a new consolidated service point. All faculty and staff in the reference/instruction and circulation units participated in the project. The new arrangement and subsequent removal of librarians from routine desk duties have expanded instructional opportunities, consistent with the university’s goals. Project participants plan further assessments to better determine the impacts of the new service arrangements.
    • Where did the reference desk go? Transforming staff and space to meet user needs.

      Arvin, Shelley (Journal of Access Services, 2016)
      A sharp decline in the number of reference queries prompted the library administration at Indiana State University to begin a project to combine the circulation, reference, and IT desks to reduce staffing at a new consolidated service point. All faculty and staff in the reference/instruction and circulation units participated in the project. The new arrangement and subsequent removal of librarians from routine desk duties have expanded instructional opportunities, consistent with the university’s goals. Project participants plan further assessments to better determine the impacts of the new service arrangements.
    • Where did the reference desk go? Transforming staff and space to meet user needs.

      Huey, Paula (Journal of Access Services, 2016)
      A sharp decline in the number of reference queries prompted the library administration at Indiana State University to begin a project to combine the circulation, reference, and IT desks to reduce staffing at a new consolidated service point. All faculty and staff in the reference/instruction and circulation units participated in the project. The new arrangement and subsequent removal of librarians from routine desk duties have expanded instructional opportunities, consistent with the university’s goals. Project participants plan further assessments to better determine the impacts of the new service arrangements.
    • WHERE THE OLD MEETS THE NEW: What Does the Next Generation Really Expect From Librarians?

      Blevens, Cheryl L.; Muyumba, Valentine K. (ERIC, 2017-11-03)
      The paradigm of librarians who continue to follow the “traditional” behavior of sitting behind a Reference Desk expecting students to come to them, is shifting. A literature search reveals a variety of ways librarians are embracing “new” ways to connect with students. They are going where the students hang out: in the classroom, in residence halls, food courts, and student lounges. The reader of this paper is given a brief overview of literature searches that were conducted by the writers but the primary focus of the paper is on the library’s program of “Librarians in The Residence Halls (“LRH”),” where librarians set up weekly, lunch time “Help” desks outside Residence Hall Dining Rooms. The program presenter will share conclusions that were drawn by the librarians as they evaluated the conclusion of the program, “What was good, what was challenging, and what could have been done better?”
    • William Byrd Covert Catholic Values with anglican anthems comparison of style to catholic Gradualia.

      Mitchell, Shelley
      William Byrd responds to the religious turmoil during his time by showing its influence in his works,along with his personal obstacles to overcome.Much if his life-style during this time depended on the personal friendships that one could develop with minor officials in the hope of avoiding the harsh treatments and heavy fines given to many recusants.
    • Women’s First Vocational Advisers: Marion Talbot and the Early Deans of Women

      Yordy, Kelly
      In her progressive pamphlet, “After College, What?,” Helen Ekin Starrett (1896) recounted the story of a father whose four daughters, all Vassar College graduates, were living at home and were unsure of their purpose and what they were to do next. “I’m not so certain about this higher education for girls and women,” said the father, “for the reason that I don’t see what they are going to do with it” (pp. 5-6). Such uncertainties surrounding the vocational opportunities and aspirations of the early women college students were commonplace in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the vocational guidance philosophies and practices of deans of women at colleges and universities in the early twentieth century. Specifically, this study will examine the work and legacy of Marion Talbot, long-serving Dean of Women at the University of Chicago, and it will seek to explore the question: how were women college students advised in determining their future vocations in the early twentieth century? A succinct outline of the research methodology will be provided, followed by a thorough presentation of the relevant findings. This outline includes a brief history of women in higher education, the role of the dean of women and Marion Talbot, the need for vocational guidance, and how vocational guidance was conducted on college and university campuses—particularly at the University of Chicago. A discussion of the findings pertaining to its immediate and longterm impact on higher education will follow. Finally, the study will conclude with recommendations for future research.
    • World Flags

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2017)
      Bibliography of publications that talk about flags of numerous nations.
    • You say potato and I say …potato? Blending the diverse flavors of literacy into a rewarding teaching experience.

      Frey, Susan; Codispoti, Margit; Evans, Karen (in absentia) (2010-05-13)
      Literacy in libraries has come to mean more than information literacy. Librarians teaching a diverse population respond not only to library users’ research and analytic skills but must also consider the varied qualities each student brings with them into the classroom. Realizing that there are bodies of knowledge, skills, and social practices with which we use the symbol systems of our culture, new definitions are beginning to emerge that recognize a multiplicity of literacies and because of this, recent developments in teaching and learning are changing what literacy means in library instruction. This presentation examines how proficiencies such as cultural literacy, generational literacy, computer literacy, numeral literacy, scientific literacy and other forms of literacy are explored in the literature including what teaching techniques are being employed to respond to this broadened view of literacy. Included in the presentation are real-life examples of how two academic institutions in Indiana are embracing different domains of literacy to teach diverse groups of students including high achievers, at-risk freshmen, international students, and the elder community.