• Bowling Alone in the Library: Building Social Capital on Campus

      Frey, Susan; Codispoti, Margit (2010-05-22)
      In 2007 the authors read a paper at PCA/ACA exploring the library-as-place movement through the lens of sociologist Ray Oldenburg’s third-place concept, and posited that the academic library can be redefined as a third-place for the campus and surrounding communities. Related to the third-place concept is Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, written by Harvard Professor of Public Policy, Robert Putnam. In this work Putnam provides extensive and compelling statistical evidence supporting his claim that social capital is critical in enabling communities to work together to address shared and individual goals. Putnam demonstrates that communities with high social capital are better educated, healthier, vote more, are more altruistic, and more prosperous than those with weaker social networks. In this thought-piece the authors revisit Oldenburg’s third-place concept using Putnam’s construct to explore how the academic library can conceptualize a methodology of establishing social capital on campus to convincingly advocate for their library and compete for diminishing campus resources.
    • Discovering buried treasure: Teaching strategies for the aging population

      Frey, Susan; Kerico, Juliet (2010-05-13)
      Traditionally community engagement for academic libraries translates as outreach to the academic community. But what are the possibilities when an academic library extends outreach to people not normally defined as university stakeholders? At Indiana State University (ISU), we learned that extending outreach to an untapped population can reap unexpected gains. For the past two years ISU instruction librarians have traveled to a local retirement community to teach computer skills as part of ISU’s Bites & Bytes Program. The initial goal of the program was to benefit the community-at-large by providing these adult learners with therapeutic activity and a social outlet. But we soon realized that these students did not behave like our pupils in the university community. We had to learn to teach to a new population of learners, and because of this our new students were teaching us as much – if not more – than we were teaching them. After networking with experts on campus who work with elders, we learned that our Bites & Bytes students were adopting learning behaviors typical of their age group – behaviors that we were unfamiliar with. So we began to learn, and in so doing we adopted teaching techniques that addressed their unique learning styles. We also began to incorporate some of these newly acquired techniques into our upper division library instruction classes. And realizing that this outreach program could offer our university students opportunity for growth, we then partnered with faculty to open up Bites & Bytes as a field site for students enrolled in a freshman social work course. In this presentation we will trace the evolution of a library community outreach initiative that grew to become part of the university curriculum, review pedagogical approaches that work with elder adult learners, and relate how some of these approaches can be employed to teach undergraduates.
    • An ethnography of student behavior in secluded and open spaces: Preliminary findings and implications for library space planning

      Bulick, Natalie; Frey, Susan
      From: Bulick, N. & Frey, S. (2019). An ethnography of student behavior in secluded and open spaces: Preliminary findings and implications for library space planning. In A. Katsirikou (Ed.), Book of abstracts: 11th Qualitative and quantitation methods in libraries QQML 2019 international conference (pp. 189-190). Maryville, Florence, Italy: International Society for the Advancement of Science and Technology. file:///C:/Users/sfrey/Desktop/Book-of-Abstracts_Final_AfterConf_v1.pdf The design of physical space in academic libraries has become an increasingly important focus of concern in serving the diverse needs of contemporary student populations. Responding to trends that shift the focus of library space away from collections-centered to more user-centered design, many are exploring ways of creating a better library user experience. To achieve this aim, valuable research has been conducted by directly asking students to articulate their wants and needs via surveys, and in some cases, interviews. However, little research has been devoted to the systematic field observation of how students’ use library spaces. Even less of this research has synthesized data findings with robust theoretical frameworks. This poster details the preliminary findings of an ethnographic study at a four-year, public university. Researchers designed a protocol to observe students in freely available secluded and non-secluded library spaces to examine behavior, communication, and social interaction within the context of proxemics theory. The anthropological study of proxemics is useful in evaluating how people behave within immediate organizations of space, and has been successfully applied to the design of public and semi-public spaces. Attendees will learn of study findings, and how these data can be applied to practical applications such as furniture composition and layout, lighting, and general space planning. Also addressed are details of the next phase of this study. Keywords: Space/Buildings; Organizational Change; Proxemics
    • From Storehouse to Clubhouse: Collection Management in the Library as Place

      Frey, Susan; Codispot, Margit (2010-05-13)
      For the past two decades people have been responding to profound societal changes brought about by the increasing digitization of information and the ubiquity of the internet. Believing that all information is mobile and stressed by shrinking budgets, administrators and policy makers are beginning to consider closing libraries in favor of offering a suite of online services. In response to this challenge to demonstrate the relevancy of the library proper in an increasingly digitized world, the library as place movement has emerged. Many libraries have adopted new models of service that have transformed library space into a place for social gathering and community engagement. Mirroring this phenomenon, traditional collection management practices in libraries are being re-evaluated. This presentation examines the changing collection management practices at two public, Indiana universities. At Indiana State University (ISU) and Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) how the collection is developed, preserved, displayed, weeded, and circulated has transformed in response to the new demands of the library as place. Included in the presentation are practical, real-world examples of collection management practices that maintain the traditional role of the library as the preserver of our culture, while adopting the new role of a vibrant community center.
    • I Am the Databank: Humanity as Archive in Three Dystopian Films

      Frey, Susan (2010-05-27)
      Archives, as repositories of information related to a person or community, can reveal much about a society’s character. As repositories of select information, archives serve an important social function. Since the information they contain is ‘worth knowing’ they are enculturative. In dystopian societies exploitation of the people is often achieved by controlling information. What data is collected, how and where it is stored, how and by whom it is managed and disseminated, and how it is officially interpreted figures largely in issues of propaganda, censorship, and privacy. Our data can become so internalized into our collective consciousness that we often interpret ourselves as artifacts of information, such as when our body art (i.e. tattoos) tells our personal story. In fiction we push this concept to the point that the human body becomes a literal archive. In Fahrenheit 451 (1966), Johnny Mnemonic (1995), and The Final Cut (2004) human beings are used as information repositories. Examining what information they preserve is as important as asking why their bodies become archives in their societies. The protagonists in these films attempt to manipulate the societal mechanisms that subjugate and dehumanize the citizenry by taking control of the data that is embedded in their own personhood. This act of rebellion not only serves a political function, but also becomes an act of personal transformation, a search for the nature of truth, and a re-examination of what it is that is ‘worth knowing’. How the characters in these films are alternately damaged and empowered by being turned into human archives is examined in an effort to expose different epistemological models and ways of coping with identity.
    • Improving student performance: Embedding your campus library in your online courseware. Poster presented at the eleventh Teaching and Learning with Technology national conference. Lafayette, Indiana.

      Frey, Susan (2009-08-26)
      For faculty teaching online classes requiring research assignments, providing appropriate library support becomes a problem. Many students naively turn to freely available internet resources, such as Google, when working on their assignments. But such tools do not always offer the appropriate scholarly information that they require. To assist students with their research, faculty often counsel them to visit the campus library where the librarian will help them navigate a bewildering array of free and proprietary databases. But providing an equivalent level of personal research support to online students can be challenging. Traditional library services to online learners include access to remote databases, online tutorials, and interlibrary loan. But the presence of the librarian as a concerned and caring guide is often missing in online courses. Research suggests that many faculty believe that integrating library resources and services into their online courseware is a burden. This misconception is usually held by those who are unaware of the types of services available to them. In most universities and colleges throughout the United States and the United Kingdom librarians support faculty with their online teaching by relieving time pressures and assisting in publishing and technology issues. These practices go way beyond inserting a link to the library’s homepage on a course management system, but focus instead on creating student-centered, customized online research experiences that improve student performance. At Indiana State University (ISU), librarians assist faculty in building their Blackboard courses. We perform a variety of functions such as creating customized tutorials and guides, participating in online discussion forums, video conferencing, and providing point-of-need research counseling by monitoring discussions and following class assignment schedules. We strive to become an unobtrusive but accessible presence in the online teaching environment. Experience has shown that our faculty see our services as valuable and time saving, while students express appreciation for our assistance. This poster presentation will provide a brief summary of research into library services in distance education paying particular attention to the concept of the embedded library and student performance. Specific examples of how ISU librarians are assisting faculty with their online teaching will be provided. Attendees will walk away with a greater understanding of what their campus library can do to help them build and manage their online courses.
    • Open Educational Resources: The ISU Textbook Affordability Initiative and Student Succ

      Frey, Susan
      Many have observed that completion and affordability are critical challenges for higher education today in terms of student success. One method being adopted internationally to address such challenges is integration of freely available Open Educational Resources (OER) in course content. OER can address the rising costs of attending college by reducing the overall cost of expensive college textbooks. However, by providing OER in lieu of textbooks, faculty do more than just address student debt concerns. OER can facilitate student learning by reducing student stress in obtaining required materials, and by engaging students in course content using such resources as OER interactive media. This poster describes how OER can enhance student learning in general, and reviews the ISU Textbook Affordability Initiative. This initiative has helped reduce ISU students’ financial burden by decreasing the need to purchase college textbooks, specifically in Foundational Studies courses, and courses required for academic majors, saving our students $3,008,743.40 (FY14 through FY19) to date. The initiative, administered by the ISU Library, involves library faculty and instructional designers working with faculty to convert their courses via a systematic, pedagogically informed process. In addition to OER integration into existing course content, OER textbooks created through the initiative are used in the university’s College Challenge Program, which is a dual credit program that enables high school students to earn ISU college credit in courses taught at their local high schools.
    • Out of sync: The time-sucking shock of teaching online.

      Frey, Susan
      Newsletter article on communication in online learning environments.
    • Pedagogical Approaches to Teaching Information Literacy to Elders

      Frey, Susan (2010-05-13)
      For the past three years instruction librarians at Indiana State University have taught information and computer literacy skills at a local retirement community as part of ISU’s Westminster Outreach Program. In teaching this population we soon realized that these learners did not behave like our university students and we had to adopt teaching techniques that addressed their unique learning styles. In this presentation we will review how we implemented and manage the program and examine teaching methods that work well with the elder, adult learner.
    • Reshaping Spaces and Rethinking Roles: Reference as Place

      Frey, Susan; Codispoti, Margit (2010-05-13)
      For the past two decades people have been responding to profound societal changes brought about by the increasing digitization of information and the ubiquity of the internet. Such change has affected libraries dramatically. Librarians have been so successful at extending information resources and services into the cyber-community that some administrators and policy-makers have begun questioning the need for maintaining the physical library. In response to this challenge a body of literature called the “library as place” has emerged in which the integrity of the library proper is examined and redefined. Mirroring this phenomenon, the traditional onsite reference desk is also being re-evaluated. Some believe that, in light of the recent growth of online reference service, the century-old reference desk is now redundant. Many librarians are redefining traditional reference spaces. For some, this has been a gradual process, in which the reference desk has mutated over time; for others, change has come swiftly and has meant a bold redesign of service. This presenation examines onsite reference service at two public, mid-western universities. At Indiana State University (ISU) the library adopted the “Borders bookstore” philosophy several years ago. Community programs such as lectures, meetings, and film series are conducted within the reference desk area. In the midst of such atypical surroundings the desk, and the role of the reference librarians, has developed —— retaining some traditional traits while adopting new characteristics. In contrast, at Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW), the change was more dramatic. The general reference desk was dismantled and librarians provide reference assistance on a scheduled appointment basis where uninterrupted one-on-one consultation takes place. But as in the ISU example, this reshaping of the physical environment heralded an alteration in the librarians’ role.
    • Sharing knowledge and expertise across departments: Creating a database to address KM (knowledge management) issues and concerns.

      Frey, Susan
      What do information professionals do when their clients cry, “We are wasting time and money tracking and re-tracking the same information!” At DePuy Orthopaedics we teamed up with colleagues from other departments to devise a knowledge-based solution to the problem. Over the years individual departments within the company attempted to manage their information needs by tracking the information themselves, many without the benefit of information technology or a standardized methodology. This created information isolation within each department. To remedy the situation the Clinical Research Department approached Technical & Business Information Services and asked if we would be willing to apply our expertise to help find a solution to this problem. This was an opportunity for the DePuy information professionals to contribute in the development of a key knowledge management project by collaborating with colleagues from other departments to devise a plan for locating the data and making it available to all employees on a web-based platform. Effective knowledge management builds not only on those with informational, behavioral, and technological expertise but also on people with valuable, often undocumented institutional knowledge. Because of this, interdepartmental teamwork is vital in developing and maintaining knowledge systems within an organization. This paper describes the Product Article Database Project to date and reviews aspects of what we learned of the information professional‟s role in the processing, preservation, and distillation of knowledge.
    • The Library As “Third Place” in Academe: Fulfilling a Need for Community in the Digital Age

      Codispoti, Margit; Frey, Susan (2010-05-13)
      Today’s highly technological society is causing people to lose their personal connections and sense of community. In his book The Great Good Place, sociologist Ray Ohlenburg identifies the need people have for a “third place” after home and work that provides for community interaction and socialization with others. In the academic community on college and university campuses, students, faculty and administrators are looking for a place on campus that provides a learning environment allowing a community of scholars to interact with one another. We contend that the library with its new mission as a center of learning and collaboration can truly become the heart of the campus or the third place within the university community. We will explore academic library services at two mid-sized publicly supported universities in Indiana, one a residential campus and one a commuter campus, to show how these two libraries are giving their own unique vision to a revised mission for libraries in the 21st century as a “third place” for students and scholars to meet, collaborate and socialize.
    • The Vigo County, Indiana, War of 1812 Bicentennial Committee: Supporting community engagement through public programming

      Frey, Susan; May, Cinda; Nichols, David
      The Vigo County, Indiana, War of 1812 Bicentennial Committee: Supporting community engagement through public programming
    • Vita vs. resume: Getting unstuck by knowing the difference.

      Frey, Susan
      A newsletter article on the differences between resumes and acaddemic-focused vitas.
    • You say potato and I say …potato? Blending the diverse flavors of literacy into a rewarding teaching experience.

      Frey, Susan; Codispoti, Margit; Evans, Karen (in absentia) (2010-05-13)
      Literacy in libraries has come to mean more than information literacy. Librarians teaching a diverse population respond not only to library users’ research and analytic skills but must also consider the varied qualities each student brings with them into the classroom. Realizing that there are bodies of knowledge, skills, and social practices with which we use the symbol systems of our culture, new definitions are beginning to emerge that recognize a multiplicity of literacies and because of this, recent developments in teaching and learning are changing what literacy means in library instruction. This presentation examines how proficiencies such as cultural literacy, generational literacy, computer literacy, numeral literacy, scientific literacy and other forms of literacy are explored in the literature including what teaching techniques are being employed to respond to this broadened view of literacy. Included in the presentation are real-life examples of how two academic institutions in Indiana are embracing different domains of literacy to teach diverse groups of students including high achievers, at-risk freshmen, international students, and the elder community.