• Data Curation at Indiana State University: Investing in and Advancing the Future of Research

      Siddell, Kayla (2015-07-21)
      This presentation discusses the role of data curation at Indiana State University.
    • Digital Initiative Services and Sycamore Scholars

      Siddell, Kayla (2017-11-29)
      This presentation teaches about Digital Initiatives and Sycamore Scholars.
    • Digital Primary Resources for Women’s Studies Students, Scholars and Potential Contributors

      Miller, Marsha (2014-10-09)
      Marsha Miller, Librarian, Cunningham Memorial Library, will present some initial findings and thoughts about how women’s studies scholars and students are (or are not) taking advantage of digital archives, including two that are very close to home. Are digital repositories providing lesson plans and other educational resources to help teachers utilize their materials? What are librarians doing to link this all together?
    • Discovering buried treasure: Teaching strategies for the aging population

      Frey, Susan; Kerico, Juliet (2010-05-13)
      Traditionally community engagement for academic libraries translates as outreach to the academic community. But what are the possibilities when an academic library extends outreach to people not normally defined as university stakeholders? At Indiana State University (ISU), we learned that extending outreach to an untapped population can reap unexpected gains. For the past two years ISU instruction librarians have traveled to a local retirement community to teach computer skills as part of ISU’s Bites & Bytes Program. The initial goal of the program was to benefit the community-at-large by providing these adult learners with therapeutic activity and a social outlet. But we soon realized that these students did not behave like our pupils in the university community. We had to learn to teach to a new population of learners, and because of this our new students were teaching us as much – if not more – than we were teaching them. After networking with experts on campus who work with elders, we learned that our Bites & Bytes students were adopting learning behaviors typical of their age group – behaviors that we were unfamiliar with. So we began to learn, and in so doing we adopted teaching techniques that addressed their unique learning styles. We also began to incorporate some of these newly acquired techniques into our upper division library instruction classes. And realizing that this outreach program could offer our university students opportunity for growth, we then partnered with faculty to open up Bites & Bytes as a field site for students enrolled in a freshman social work course. In this presentation we will trace the evolution of a library community outreach initiative that grew to become part of the university curriculum, review pedagogical approaches that work with elder adult learners, and relate how some of these approaches can be employed to teach undergraduates.
    • English Newspapers at Indiana State University

      McGiverin, Rolland (2020-09-01)
      Bibliography of historic English newspapers at ISU.
    • An ethnography of student behavior in secluded and open spaces: Preliminary findings and implications for library space planning

      Bulick, Natalie; Frey, Susan
      From: Bulick, N. & Frey, S. (2019). An ethnography of student behavior in secluded and open spaces: Preliminary findings and implications for library space planning. In A. Katsirikou (Ed.), Book of abstracts: 11th Qualitative and quantitation methods in libraries QQML 2019 international conference (pp. 189-190). Maryville, Florence, Italy: International Society for the Advancement of Science and Technology. file:///C:/Users/sfrey/Desktop/Book-of-Abstracts_Final_AfterConf_v1.pdf The design of physical space in academic libraries has become an increasingly important focus of concern in serving the diverse needs of contemporary student populations. Responding to trends that shift the focus of library space away from collections-centered to more user-centered design, many are exploring ways of creating a better library user experience. To achieve this aim, valuable research has been conducted by directly asking students to articulate their wants and needs via surveys, and in some cases, interviews. However, little research has been devoted to the systematic field observation of how students’ use library spaces. Even less of this research has synthesized data findings with robust theoretical frameworks. This poster details the preliminary findings of an ethnographic study at a four-year, public university. Researchers designed a protocol to observe students in freely available secluded and non-secluded library spaces to examine behavior, communication, and social interaction within the context of proxemics theory. The anthropological study of proxemics is useful in evaluating how people behave within immediate organizations of space, and has been successfully applied to the design of public and semi-public spaces. Attendees will learn of study findings, and how these data can be applied to practical applications such as furniture composition and layout, lighting, and general space planning. Also addressed are details of the next phase of this study. Keywords: Space/Buildings; Organizational Change; Proxemics
    • Flags of Africa

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2016-10-01)
    • Flags of Asia

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2017-05-02)
    • Flags of Europe

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2016)
    • Flags of North America

      Rolland, McGiverin (Indiana State University, 2017)
    • Flags of Oceania

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2016-01-01)
    • Flags of South America

      McGiverin, Rolland (Indiana State University, 2016)
    • The Food Pyramid: Mexicans, Agribusiness, Governments and Communities in the Midwest Migrant Stream

      Sutrina-Haney, Katie (Northern Illinois University, 2016-05)
      As recent scholarship and even popular works and documentaries demonstrate, the United States public is largely unaware how our food ends up on our table. While some popular works found in bookstores explore where our food comes from, these works rarely analyze the role of labor and specifically the system of the migrant farmworker stream. Workers in the field make possible the complex process from the growth of produce to the selling of food to consumers. By the 1960s, communities and states in the Midwest reacted to editorialized and documented condemnation of the living and working conditions of migrant farmworkers as seen in films like Harvest of Shame, as well as national concerns over the civil rights of minorities. In analyzing the migrant stream of the Midwest before the international and national changes of the North American Free Trade Agreement signed in 1993, this work expands upon a part of the migrant experience that is rarely detailed. While national factors influenced the structure of the migrant stream in the Midwest, this study argues that the crops, communities, and corporations of the Midwest migrant stream also played a distinctive role in the national story of the migrant stream. In analyzing the structure of power in the Midwest migrant stream through the roles of farmworker families, national and state governments, growers, farmworker unions, agribusinesses, and Catholic organizations, this dissertation enhances our understanding of the Midwest through the lens of gender, resistance, manipulation, agency, communities, and control. Specifically focusing on the Mexican migrant farmworkers who came primarily from Texas, Florida, and Mexico to the Midwest states of Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, Minnesota, and Indiana as laborers during the 1960s to 1993, my dissertation explores the importance of gender, governments, agribusinesses, farmers, and migrants in shaping the Midwest migrant stream.
    • From Storehouse to Clubhouse: Collection Management in the Library as Place

      Frey, Susan; Codispot, Margit (2010-05-13)
      For the past two decades people have been responding to profound societal changes brought about by the increasing digitization of information and the ubiquity of the internet. Believing that all information is mobile and stressed by shrinking budgets, administrators and policy makers are beginning to consider closing libraries in favor of offering a suite of online services. In response to this challenge to demonstrate the relevancy of the library proper in an increasingly digitized world, the library as place movement has emerged. Many libraries have adopted new models of service that have transformed library space into a place for social gathering and community engagement. Mirroring this phenomenon, traditional collection management practices in libraries are being re-evaluated. This presentation examines the changing collection management practices at two public, Indiana universities. At Indiana State University (ISU) and Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) how the collection is developed, preserved, displayed, weeded, and circulated has transformed in response to the new demands of the library as place. Included in the presentation are practical, real-world examples of collection management practices that maintain the traditional role of the library as the preserver of our culture, while adopting the new role of a vibrant community center.
    • The Hine Bibliography of Resources on Servant Leadership

      Muyumba, Valentine; Hine, Betsy N. (2015-09)
    • The Hine Bibliography of Resources on Servant Leadership

      Muyumba, Valentine; Hine, Betsy N. (2015-09)