• The Hine Bibliography of Resources on Servant Leadership

      Muyumba, Valentine; Hine, Betsy N. (2015-09)
    • The Hine Bibliography of Resources on Servant Leadership

      Muyumba, Valentine; Hine, Betsy N. (2015-09)
    • I Am the Databank: Humanity as Archive in Three Dystopian Films

      Frey, Susan (2010-05-27)
      Archives, as repositories of information related to a person or community, can reveal much about a society’s character. As repositories of select information, archives serve an important social function. Since the information they contain is ‘worth knowing’ they are enculturative. In dystopian societies exploitation of the people is often achieved by controlling information. What data is collected, how and where it is stored, how and by whom it is managed and disseminated, and how it is officially interpreted figures largely in issues of propaganda, censorship, and privacy. Our data can become so internalized into our collective consciousness that we often interpret ourselves as artifacts of information, such as when our body art (i.e. tattoos) tells our personal story. In fiction we push this concept to the point that the human body becomes a literal archive. In Fahrenheit 451 (1966), Johnny Mnemonic (1995), and The Final Cut (2004) human beings are used as information repositories. Examining what information they preserve is as important as asking why their bodies become archives in their societies. The protagonists in these films attempt to manipulate the societal mechanisms that subjugate and dehumanize the citizenry by taking control of the data that is embedded in their own personhood. This act of rebellion not only serves a political function, but also becomes an act of personal transformation, a search for the nature of truth, and a re-examination of what it is that is ‘worth knowing’. How the characters in these films are alternately damaged and empowered by being turned into human archives is examined in an effort to expose different epistemological models and ways of coping with identity.
    • Identifying Institutional Trends in Collaborative and Interdisciplinary Research Using Bibliometrics

      Youngen, Gregory K. (2013-12-03)
      Research output, in the form of peer-reviewed journal articles, is analyzed to assess the collaborative and interdisciplinary nature of work performed at Indiana State University. Using Thompson-Reuters Web of Knowledge, articles authored by ISU faculty over the past 13 years (2000-2012) were analyzed to identify co-authorships, inter-institutional affiliations and cross-disciplinary collaborations. The resulting data can be used to identify trends in publication, research, and funding. The data may also be used to identify potential areas of research for future endeavors. The methodology employed in this study can be easily applied to other institutions. Methodology: Web of Knowledge (WoK) is an interdisciplinary database of peer-reviewed journal literature that includes enhanced, detailed indexing of articles published in the major journals of most academic disciplines. A search strategy is formulated to identify all the authors from a given institution. For ISU, it was a simple zip code search in the author address field. The search results are downloaded, then imported into an Excel spreadsheet. Each article record includes subject heading, source title, institutional affiliation of the authors, country, and other citation information. The records are then compiled and standardized for uniformity in Excel. Textual analysis tools and visualization tools--including word clouds, maps, and bubble charts-- are employed to clarify the data through illustration. • Tools: ISI Web of Knowledge / Microsoft Excel / Data visualization software • Process: Download and compile an institution’s combined peer-reviewed journal article output for a period of time • Analyze: Co-author data for internal and external collaborations • Identify: Areas of strength as indicated by total publication records • Identify: Subject areas of interdisciplinary research based on author home departments Results: Data analysis identifies trends and varying degrees of interdisciplinary work across most schools and departments at the University. Visualizations are used to compare the disciplines and identify trends over time. The publishing output highlights the differing degrees of collaboration within the disciplines, identifies institutional partnerships, and the subject areas of research output. Conclusions: WoK identifies three broad areas of research: 1) Science/Technology/Medicine (STM); 2) the Social Sciences; and 3) the Arts/Humanities. As might be expected, most inter-institutional and inter-disciplinary collaboration occurs within STM. This is no exception at ISU. Likewise, the Social Sciences mostly collaborate among their related disciplines. The Arts and Humanities have the least amount of interdisciplinary collaboration and co-authorship, but that’s not to say it doesn’t exist. This study found a significant number of papers that were cross identified in at least two broad areas, and a few papers were included in all three.
    • Improving student performance: Embedding your campus library in your online courseware. Poster presented at the eleventh Teaching and Learning with Technology national conference. Lafayette, Indiana.

      Frey, Susan (2009-08-26)
      For faculty teaching online classes requiring research assignments, providing appropriate library support becomes a problem. Many students naively turn to freely available internet resources, such as Google, when working on their assignments. But such tools do not always offer the appropriate scholarly information that they require. To assist students with their research, faculty often counsel them to visit the campus library where the librarian will help them navigate a bewildering array of free and proprietary databases. But providing an equivalent level of personal research support to online students can be challenging. Traditional library services to online learners include access to remote databases, online tutorials, and interlibrary loan. But the presence of the librarian as a concerned and caring guide is often missing in online courses. Research suggests that many faculty believe that integrating library resources and services into their online courseware is a burden. This misconception is usually held by those who are unaware of the types of services available to them. In most universities and colleges throughout the United States and the United Kingdom librarians support faculty with their online teaching by relieving time pressures and assisting in publishing and technology issues. These practices go way beyond inserting a link to the library’s homepage on a course management system, but focus instead on creating student-centered, customized online research experiences that improve student performance. At Indiana State University (ISU), librarians assist faculty in building their Blackboard courses. We perform a variety of functions such as creating customized tutorials and guides, participating in online discussion forums, video conferencing, and providing point-of-need research counseling by monitoring discussions and following class assignment schedules. We strive to become an unobtrusive but accessible presence in the online teaching environment. Experience has shown that our faculty see our services as valuable and time saving, while students express appreciation for our assistance. This poster presentation will provide a brief summary of research into library services in distance education paying particular attention to the concept of the embedded library and student performance. Specific examples of how ISU librarians are assisting faculty with their online teaching will be provided. Attendees will walk away with a greater understanding of what their campus library can do to help them build and manage their online courses.
    • Indian and Irish Newspapers: A bibliography

      McGiverin, Rolland (2020-09-01)
      bibliography of Irish and Indian newspapers in ISU collection.
    • Information literacy in the corporate environment: Teaching the scientist, engineer, and business professional. Invited lecture presented to a graduate information literacy class, School of Library and Information Science, Indiana University. Bloomington, Indiana.

      Frey, Susan (2009-07-22)
      Slides to a lecture given to library science graduate students on teaching information literacy in the corporate environment from an academic librarian who had served in industry during her career. Observations on the difference behaviors of expert versus novice researchers, plus disciplinary differences in information seeking behavior are covered.
    • Jorge Garcia Highlights 2013 ASIS&T Annual Meeting

      Hardin, Steve (2014-10-10)
      At the 2013 ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Jorge García discussed the transformation of new information technologies from imagined abstractions to reality. Through old and current advertisements and interviews with futurist Arthur C. Clarke and communication theorist Marshall McLuhan, García illustrated the progressive revolutions embodied by the telephone, a shift from commuting to communicating, early visions of the Internet, new media and big data. Handling the change requires a continuous process of abstracting reality, augmenting, assimilating and creating models to represent its key features. García recognized data as an asset to be distilled and classified, stored in expanding volumes and transmitted at astounding speeds. Layered with contextual information and supportive technology, data can be used to enhance human intelligence and capability. García closed with an admonition to limit potential negative effects of technology by implementing clear and ethical practices in data and information use.
    • Managing Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETD) Data

      Siddell, Kayla (2017-09-08)
      Where should students store data after they have completed their Electronic Thesis or Dissertation (ETDs)? The MetaArchive Cooperative has created the ETD+ Toolkit as an approach to improving research output management. This session will cover best practices in data curation and digital longevity techniques that will help students and faculty identify and offset risks and threats to their digital research footprints. We will discuss what to do with the data, how to handle copyright, version control, data organization, file formatting and metadata as well as where should these things be stored.
    • Night Photo

      Vancil, David E. (2011-08-30)
    • Open Educational Resources: The ISU Textbook Affordability Initiative and Student Succ

      Frey, Susan
      Many have observed that completion and affordability are critical challenges for higher education today in terms of student success. One method being adopted internationally to address such challenges is integration of freely available Open Educational Resources (OER) in course content. OER can address the rising costs of attending college by reducing the overall cost of expensive college textbooks. However, by providing OER in lieu of textbooks, faculty do more than just address student debt concerns. OER can facilitate student learning by reducing student stress in obtaining required materials, and by engaging students in course content using such resources as OER interactive media. This poster describes how OER can enhance student learning in general, and reviews the ISU Textbook Affordability Initiative. This initiative has helped reduce ISU students’ financial burden by decreasing the need to purchase college textbooks, specifically in Foundational Studies courses, and courses required for academic majors, saving our students $3,008,743.40 (FY14 through FY19) to date. The initiative, administered by the ISU Library, involves library faculty and instructional designers working with faculty to convert their courses via a systematic, pedagogically informed process. In addition to OER integration into existing course content, OER textbooks created through the initiative are used in the university’s College Challenge Program, which is a dual credit program that enables high school students to earn ISU college credit in courses taught at their local high schools.
    • Out of sync: The time-sucking shock of teaching online.

      Frey, Susan
      Newsletter article on communication in online learning environments.
    • Pedagogical Approaches to Teaching Information Literacy to Elders

      Frey, Susan (2010-05-13)
      For the past three years instruction librarians at Indiana State University have taught information and computer literacy skills at a local retirement community as part of ISU’s Westminster Outreach Program. In teaching this population we soon realized that these learners did not behave like our university students and we had to adopt teaching techniques that addressed their unique learning styles. In this presentation we will review how we implemented and manage the program and examine teaching methods that work well with the elder, adult learner.
    • Reimagining Institutional repositories through Inclusiveness and Collaboration

      Siddell, Kayla; Sutrina-Haney, Katie (2015-07-21)
      This presentation discusses a strategy for a re imagining institutional repository by including the arts and expanding the scope by collaborating with underrepresented departments.
    • Reinventing Institutional Repositories with cross-campus collaboration

      Siddell, Kayla (2015-07-21)
      This presentation was presented at the Ohio Valley Group of Technical Services Librarians OVGTSL 2015 conferences hosted by ISU about collaboration in institutional repositories and including arts in the IR.
    • Research Data Management

      Siddell, Kayla (2015-07-21)
      This presentation discusses basic data management principles.
    • Reshaping Spaces and Rethinking Roles: Reference as Place

      Frey, Susan; Codispoti, Margit (2010-05-13)
      For the past two decades people have been responding to profound societal changes brought about by the increasing digitization of information and the ubiquity of the internet. Such change has affected libraries dramatically. Librarians have been so successful at extending information resources and services into the cyber-community that some administrators and policy-makers have begun questioning the need for maintaining the physical library. In response to this challenge a body of literature called the “library as place” has emerged in which the integrity of the library proper is examined and redefined. Mirroring this phenomenon, the traditional onsite reference desk is also being re-evaluated. Some believe that, in light of the recent growth of online reference service, the century-old reference desk is now redundant. Many librarians are redefining traditional reference spaces. For some, this has been a gradual process, in which the reference desk has mutated over time; for others, change has come swiftly and has meant a bold redesign of service. This presenation examines onsite reference service at two public, mid-western universities. At Indiana State University (ISU) the library adopted the “Borders bookstore” philosophy several years ago. Community programs such as lectures, meetings, and film series are conducted within the reference desk area. In the midst of such atypical surroundings the desk, and the role of the reference librarians, has developed —— retaining some traditional traits while adopting new characteristics. In contrast, at Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW), the change was more dramatic. The general reference desk was dismantled and librarians provide reference assistance on a scheduled appointment basis where uninterrupted one-on-one consultation takes place. But as in the ISU example, this reshaping of the physical environment heralded an alteration in the librarians’ role.