• Managing Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETD) Data

      Siddell, Kayla (2017-09-08)
      Where should students store data after they have completed their Electronic Thesis or Dissertation (ETDs)? The MetaArchive Cooperative has created the ETD+ Toolkit as an approach to improving research output management. This session will cover best practices in data curation and digital longevity techniques that will help students and faculty identify and offset risks and threats to their digital research footprints. We will discuss what to do with the data, how to handle copyright, version control, data organization, file formatting and metadata as well as where should these things be stored.
    • Night Photo

      Vancil, David E. (2011-08-30)
    • Open Educational Resources: The ISU Textbook Affordability Initiative and Student Succ

      Frey, Susan
      Many have observed that completion and affordability are critical challenges for higher education today in terms of student success. One method being adopted internationally to address such challenges is integration of freely available Open Educational Resources (OER) in course content. OER can address the rising costs of attending college by reducing the overall cost of expensive college textbooks. However, by providing OER in lieu of textbooks, faculty do more than just address student debt concerns. OER can facilitate student learning by reducing student stress in obtaining required materials, and by engaging students in course content using such resources as OER interactive media. This poster describes how OER can enhance student learning in general, and reviews the ISU Textbook Affordability Initiative. This initiative has helped reduce ISU students’ financial burden by decreasing the need to purchase college textbooks, specifically in Foundational Studies courses, and courses required for academic majors, saving our students $3,008,743.40 (FY14 through FY19) to date. The initiative, administered by the ISU Library, involves library faculty and instructional designers working with faculty to convert their courses via a systematic, pedagogically informed process. In addition to OER integration into existing course content, OER textbooks created through the initiative are used in the university’s College Challenge Program, which is a dual credit program that enables high school students to earn ISU college credit in courses taught at their local high schools.
    • Out of sync: The time-sucking shock of teaching online.

      Frey, Susan
      Newsletter article on communication in online learning environments.
    • Pedagogical Approaches to Teaching Information Literacy to Elders

      Frey, Susan (2010-05-13)
      For the past three years instruction librarians at Indiana State University have taught information and computer literacy skills at a local retirement community as part of ISU’s Westminster Outreach Program. In teaching this population we soon realized that these learners did not behave like our university students and we had to adopt teaching techniques that addressed their unique learning styles. In this presentation we will review how we implemented and manage the program and examine teaching methods that work well with the elder, adult learner.
    • Reimagining Institutional repositories through Inclusiveness and Collaboration

      Siddell, Kayla; Sutrina-Haney, Katie (2015-07-21)
      This presentation discusses a strategy for a re imagining institutional repository by including the arts and expanding the scope by collaborating with underrepresented departments.
    • Reinventing Institutional Repositories with cross-campus collaboration

      Siddell, Kayla (2015-07-21)
      This presentation was presented at the Ohio Valley Group of Technical Services Librarians OVGTSL 2015 conferences hosted by ISU about collaboration in institutional repositories and including arts in the IR.
    • Research Data Management

      Siddell, Kayla (2015-07-21)
      This presentation discusses basic data management principles.
    • Reshaping Spaces and Rethinking Roles: Reference as Place

      Frey, Susan; Codispoti, Margit (2010-05-13)
      For the past two decades people have been responding to profound societal changes brought about by the increasing digitization of information and the ubiquity of the internet. Such change has affected libraries dramatically. Librarians have been so successful at extending information resources and services into the cyber-community that some administrators and policy-makers have begun questioning the need for maintaining the physical library. In response to this challenge a body of literature called the “library as place” has emerged in which the integrity of the library proper is examined and redefined. Mirroring this phenomenon, the traditional onsite reference desk is also being re-evaluated. Some believe that, in light of the recent growth of online reference service, the century-old reference desk is now redundant. Many librarians are redefining traditional reference spaces. For some, this has been a gradual process, in which the reference desk has mutated over time; for others, change has come swiftly and has meant a bold redesign of service. This presenation examines onsite reference service at two public, mid-western universities. At Indiana State University (ISU) the library adopted the “Borders bookstore” philosophy several years ago. Community programs such as lectures, meetings, and film series are conducted within the reference desk area. In the midst of such atypical surroundings the desk, and the role of the reference librarians, has developed —— retaining some traditional traits while adopting new characteristics. In contrast, at Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW), the change was more dramatic. The general reference desk was dismantled and librarians provide reference assistance on a scheduled appointment basis where uninterrupted one-on-one consultation takes place. But as in the ISU example, this reshaping of the physical environment heralded an alteration in the librarians’ role.
    • Restoring Information’s Body

      Hardin, Steve (2011-02-16)
      As plenary speaker for the ASIS&T 2010 Annual Meeting, Lucy Suchman based her presentation on a reference by author N. Katherine Hayles asserting that information has lost its body. Efforts to restore information’s body must recognize the references and context of the information to bring the information back to a point of meaning. In exploring the importance of context for meaningful information, Suchman drew comparisons to the human work behind information, the agent critical to initiate an action, the work meaningful through indirect interactions with an object at a distance. She made further parallels to conversations with a disembodied head, remote control warfare and robotic health care – all interactions with machines, but with humans as invisible agents. Communications research, Suchman indicated, must be mindful of the connection between information and its body in order to fully understand information content.
    • Sharing knowledge and expertise across departments: Creating a database to address KM (knowledge management) issues and concerns.

      Frey, Susan
      What do information professionals do when their clients cry, “We are wasting time and money tracking and re-tracking the same information!” At DePuy Orthopaedics we teamed up with colleagues from other departments to devise a knowledge-based solution to the problem. Over the years individual departments within the company attempted to manage their information needs by tracking the information themselves, many without the benefit of information technology or a standardized methodology. This created information isolation within each department. To remedy the situation the Clinical Research Department approached Technical & Business Information Services and asked if we would be willing to apply our expertise to help find a solution to this problem. This was an opportunity for the DePuy information professionals to contribute in the development of a key knowledge management project by collaborating with colleagues from other departments to devise a plan for locating the data and making it available to all employees on a web-based platform. Effective knowledge management builds not only on those with informational, behavioral, and technological expertise but also on people with valuable, often undocumented institutional knowledge. Because of this, interdepartmental teamwork is vital in developing and maintaining knowledge systems within an organization. This paper describes the Product Article Database Project to date and reviews aspects of what we learned of the information professional‟s role in the processing, preservation, and distillation of knowledge.
    • Special Collections Resources and Services

      Siddell, Kayla; Sutrina-Haney, Katie (2015-04-27)
      This presentation details the resources and services available through the Special Collections department of Cunningham Memorial library at Indiana State University.
    • The Art School Baby

      Vancil, David E. (2011-08-30)
    • The Library As “Third Place” in Academe: Fulfilling a Need for Community in the Digital Age

      Codispoti, Margit; Frey, Susan (2010-05-13)
      Today’s highly technological society is causing people to lose their personal connections and sense of community. In his book The Great Good Place, sociologist Ray Ohlenburg identifies the need people have for a “third place” after home and work that provides for community interaction and socialization with others. In the academic community on college and university campuses, students, faculty and administrators are looking for a place on campus that provides a learning environment allowing a community of scholars to interact with one another. We contend that the library with its new mission as a center of learning and collaboration can truly become the heart of the campus or the third place within the university community. We will explore academic library services at two mid-sized publicly supported universities in Indiana, one a residential campus and one a commuter campus, to show how these two libraries are giving their own unique vision to a revised mission for libraries in the 21st century as a “third place” for students and scholars to meet, collaborate and socialize.
    • Tips, tricks, and change: getting your resource sharing department out of the storm and into calmer waters

      Moseman, Holli (2015-07-20)
      Resource sharing departments can feel like a raging storm with smaller staffs, budgets, and the need for quicker turnaround. Changing a few ways you do business could make a huge impact on your time and your budget. Learn not only tips but about reciprocal contracts and other billing issues, how to start analyzing your workflow for overhaul, and what other libraries are doing to get out of the storm and into calmer waters.
    • The Value of Graphic Novels: Furthering the Cause of Information Literacy

      Blevens, Cheryl L.; Muyumba, Valentine K. (ERIC, 2015-11-06)
      Graphic novels have come a long way since being regarded as comic books unworthy of use beyond being a quick read by young people. A literature review of the use of graphic novels reveals that the use of graphic novels has moved far beyond appealing to the visual learner. In addition to serving the recreational reading needs of children and adults, today’s educators are using them to support reading comprehension and enhance the learning process of English-language learners. They are also used to assist visual learners and to entice reluctant readers and struggling students. Beyond building literacy into the students’ education, they support development of the multimodal skills needed for future success in the 21st Century workplace. The authors highlight the multiple ways that graphic novels are currently being used in and out of the classroom for adults and students alike.
    • The Value of Graphic Novels: Furthering the Cause of Information Literacy

      Blevens, Cheryl L.; Muyumba, Valentine K. (ERIC, 2015-11-06)
      Graphic novels have come a long way since being regarded as comic books unworthy of use beyond being a quick read by young people. A literature review of the use of graphic novels reveals that the use of graphic novels has moved far beyond appealing to the visual learner. In addition to serving the recreational reading needs of children and adults, today’s educators are using them to support reading comprehension and enhance the learning process of English-language learners. They are also used to assist visual learners and to entice reluctant readers and struggling students. Beyond building literacy into the students’ education, they support development of the multimodal skills needed for future success in the 21st Century workplace. The authors highlight the multiple ways that graphic novels are currently being used in and out of the classroom for adults and students alike.