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dc.contributor.authorMontgomery, Crista
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-11T17:34:20Z
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-01T17:08:52Z
dc.date.available2010-05-11T17:34:20Z
dc.date.available2015-10-01T17:08:52Z
dc.date.issued2010-05-11T17:34:20Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10484/905
dc.description.abstractA growing literature on professional training and practice of psychology advocates that psychologists must be educated on risks and effects of impairment and the importance of self-care. Despite the general recognition of the importance of these issues, they have not been incorporated into training standards such as the American Psychological Association (APA) Guidelines and Principles of Accreditation (2007). In order to assess the approaches that programs currently adopt to address impairment and self-care, this study extended and updated previous research. A large sample of students (n = 591) enrolled in APA accredited doctoral training programs in professional psychology completed surveys regarding their training in self-care and impairment. Trainee well-being was also measured using satisfaction and stress (both professional and personal) scales. How interventions vary by program type was examined. Results showed that psychology trainee reports of professional and personal well-being were consistent with those of similar populations, such as other doctoral students (Pavot & Diener, 1993) and medical students (Firth, 1986). The respondents’ relationship status was not significantly associated with ratings of professional well-being, but partnered individuals scored higher on personal well-being measures. Also, professional satisfaction was higher in younger students and second year students endorsed significantly higher professional stress than first years. The most common interventions students reported receiving were focused primarily on enhancing relational skills and providing of interpersonal support. Programs differed somewhat in the type of interventions they employ to address student well-being. The majority of students reported a desire for their program to increase the amount of interventions offered. Implications, limitations, and suggestions for future research are explored.
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityCrista Montgomery, M.S.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subject.lcshGraduate students.
dc.subject.lcshTraining.
dc.subject.lcshStress management.
dc.subject.lcshSatisfaction.
dc.subject.lcshPsychology--Study and teaching (Higher)
dc.subject.otherSelf-care.
dc.titleProfessional Psychology Training Programs: Program Interventions and Prediction of Doctoral Student Stress and Life Satisfaction
dc.typeDissertation
dc.date.graduationmonthDecember
dc.date.published2009
dc.description.committeechairMurphy, Michael J.
dc.description.committeemembersElizabeth O'Laughlin
dc.description.committeemembersJune Sprock
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Psychology
dc.description.departmentDepartment of Psychology
dc.description.imprintCunningham Memorial library, Terre Haute,Indiana State University
dc.description.levelDoctoral
dc.description.noteTitle from document title page. Document formatted into pages: contains 128 p.: ill. Includes abstract and appendix.
refterms.dateFOA2021-06-02T10:50:04Z


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